8 Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier #best #home #mortgage #rates


#pay off mortgage early

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8 Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier

Adding about $100 to your monthly payment can shave thousands of dollars, and several years, off of your mortgage. (iStockPhoto)

The mortgage burning party may have gone the way of the rotary phone, but that doesn’t mean Americans don’t own their homes free and clear anymore. In fact, about 34 percent of homeowners in the U.S. no longer have a mortgage, according to U.S. Census data.

The stories of people who pay off 30-year mortgages after 30 years in the same home are indeed rarer than they once were. But the recent foreclosure crisis did serve as an incentive for homeowners to pay off their loans sooner rather than later – and some have actually given it a try.

Jackie Beck, creator of the Pay Off Debt app, and her husband paid their $95,000 home mortgage in less than three years. To finish off the mortgage, they repeated the same tactics they had used to vanquish their credit card, student loan and auto loan debt. The secret to their success? They started earning more money but didn’t increase their expenses, plus they were careful not to borrow any more money.

For Beck and her husband, the major benefit was having more money for travel and other goals. Not having to make a house payment also meant that Beck could quit her full-time job and focus on marketing her app and running her own The Debt Myth website business.

While living mortgage-free may sound like an enviable goal, paying off your mortgage early isn’t always the best use of your money, says Todd Tresidder, a financial coach and author who publishes the website FinancialMentor.com. He was asked about the merits of paying off a mortgage early so many times by his readers and clients that he wrote up an exhaustive 5,200-word article, with charts, covering all the considerations.

The 140-character Twitter version: You might be better off putting your extra cash elsewhere, but the emotional payoff of being debt-free matters.

“The intuitive response is to get out of debt. We all want the security of owning our castle free and clear with one less expense to deal with. The prospect of making monthly payments for the next 30 years is antithetical to freedom,” Tresidder wrote. “However, there are times when intuition and finance disagree. … The correct answer is not cookie-cutter but must be custom fitted to your personal financial situation.”

If you have high-interest credit card or student loan debt, you’re much better off paying those off before making extra mortgage payments. Saving for your child’s college education and funding your 401(k) at least to the point of getting the maximum employer match – and maybe more – may also be more important than getting ahead on your mortgage.

Beyond that, you want to make sure you have enough cash on hand for emergencies because drawing from your home equity isn’t always easy. If your mortgage is underwater, or if you anticipate losing your house to foreclosure or short sale, making extra mortgage payments is just throwing money away.

The harder calculation is whether you’re better off investing your money or applying it toward your mortgage. When the market is strong (for whatever investment you’re making), you will likely earn much more on your investments than you are paying in interest on your mortgage. But if your investments lose money, you would have been better off applying that cash to your mortgage.

Many people aim to pay off their mortgages before they retire, but even that may not be the best move in all circumstances.

Having a mortgage does provide a tax break, but it’s not as good a benefit as many people think. According to an analysis of 2012 tax data by The Pew Charitable Trusts, just under 24 percent of tax filers claim the deduction. Many homeowners, even those who itemize, often find they do better on their taxes with the standard deduction.

For those homeowners who are fully funding their retirement accounts, are free of high-interest debt and have enough cash socked away for other life goals, here are eight simple ways to pay off your mortgage early.

Add something to every month’s payment. The advantage to extra payments is that all that money goes toward principal. Early in a mortgage, most of your regular payment goes toward interest. According to calculations by Bankrate.com, if you added an extra $100 to your payment of a new $100,000 30-year mortgage at 4.5 percent interest, you’d pay off the mortgage eight and a half years early and save more than $26,300 in interest.

Make a payment every two weeks. There are companies that volunteer to set this up for you, for a fee, but you can do it yourself for nothing. You’re effectively making a full extra payment each year. Paying half your mortgage payment every two weeks, on that same $100,000, 30-year mortgage at 4.5 percent, would cut just under 5.5 years off the term and save roughly $14,000, according to a calculator at The Mortgage Professor site run by Jack Guttentag. Splitting your mortgage payment into two pieces produces minimal savings.

Make extra payments whenever you can. Beck and her husband started by paying $35 extra per month, but then began making additional payments, at one point so eager to pay off the loan that they made eight payments in a month.

Make one extra payment a year. This provides about the same savings as making half a payment every two weeks. When you make the payment isn’t important. You could make it at the end of the year or wait until you get a tax refund or a bonus.

Refinance your mortgage to a lower rate, and keep making the higher payment. The amount this will save depends on the exact figures, but it should shave years off your mortgage and save you thousands in interest.

Refinance your mortgage to a shorter term. This cuts the amount of interest you pay significantly as well as getting you out of debt sooner.

Contribute funds from another source. Designate money from a bonus, odd jobs or freelance work toward paying of the mortgage. If your income is variable, rather than making regular additional payments toward principal, make one big payment when you can.

Cut expenses and put the savings toward your mortgage. Change to a cheaper cellphone plan, cut the cable cord or otherwise cut living expenses and devote that extra money to extra mortgage payments. Living a frugal lifestyle may be difficult in the moment, but it’s worth the struggle if your ultimate goal is to be debt-free.


RN to MSN Programs #aacn, #rn-to-msn, #article, #programs, #years, #degree, #masters, #program, #courses, #course, #work,


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RN to MSN Programs

RN to MSN programs directly bridge rns with diplomas and associate degrees to the master’s degree level (master of science in nursing degree). These type programs require licensure as a registered nurse, a certain amount of bedside work experience (usually 1 or 2 years), gre or mat (with minimum specified score, completed either before entry or at halfway point of program), and a gpa of 2.5 to 3.0 or higher.

As in RN-BSN programs, certain prerequisite courses must be completed before being admitted into RN-MSN programs. Specific requirements vary by institution and the student’s previous course work.

According to the AACN, there are currently 160 RN-MSN programs available nationwide. The number of RN to MSN programs has more than doubled over the past 15 years, from 70 programs in 1994 to the 160 programs today.

These programs facilitate the transition to the graduate nursing degree level with minimal repetition of courses and maximal flexibility for learners. Some RN to MSN programs are offered in an entirely online format; others are a blend of traditional classroom and online courses.

There are clinical requirements (clinical practicum, etc.) that often may be completed in the student’s local community.

RN to MSN programs generally require about 3 years to complete for the fulltime student. These programs combine 1 year of an RN-BSN program with 2 years of graduate study. Baccalaureate content is built into the beginning of the program and graduate specialty course work in the latter part of the program.

Duplicate courses (such as nursing issues) that appear in both BSN and MSN programs (around 6 to 9 semester hours) are deleted from the curriculum. Upon completion, some programs award both the baccalaureate and master’s degree, but some only award a master’s degree.

Several years ago, one of my good friends completed an ADN to MSN program and is a successful family nurse practitioner today. She worked night shift and during slow shifts would work on her course requirements. It took her about 4 or 5 years to finish, as she was a part-time student.

Last edit by Joe V on Jan 12, ’15

The only thing that I don’t like about the RN to MSN programs is that many of them require the GRE to be taken mid-way through the program. and if you don’t get the minimum score, you cannot proceed in the program.

To me, that is too much of a gamble. and I have yet to see a program that didn’t require it.

If someone has found one (not a private online, for-profit school. they are too expensive). please shoot me a PM.

This RN-MSN program gives the option of either the MAT or GRE upon admission.

I’m looking at a program at USA in Mobile, AL. clinical nurse leader. I have my associate and most all prereq’s for my BSN. It does award a BSN. My only thing is the CNL is new and I am 51 yrs old! How is the job market for CNL especially for an older(but young at heart) nurse? I don’t want to waste my time, but would really like to advance my degree, my knowledge base, and my career.

From what I have personally observed, the job market for the CNL is not good – it is a dud. Going for a more established Master’s specialty, such as the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is a better move, in my opinion. The latter is also an advanced practice nursing specialty, whereas the CNL is not.


8 Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier #house #payment #calculator #with #taxes


#pay off mortgage early

#

8 Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier

Adding about $100 to your monthly payment can shave thousands of dollars, and several years, off of your mortgage. (iStockPhoto)

The mortgage burning party may have gone the way of the rotary phone, but that doesn’t mean Americans don’t own their homes free and clear anymore. In fact, about 34 percent of homeowners in the U.S. no longer have a mortgage, according to U.S. Census data.

The stories of people who pay off 30-year mortgages after 30 years in the same home are indeed rarer than they once were. But the recent foreclosure crisis did serve as an incentive for homeowners to pay off their loans sooner rather than later – and some have actually given it a try.

Jackie Beck, creator of the Pay Off Debt app, and her husband paid their $95,000 home mortgage in less than three years. To finish off the mortgage, they repeated the same tactics they had used to vanquish their credit card, student loan and auto loan debt. The secret to their success? They started earning more money but didn’t increase their expenses, plus they were careful not to borrow any more money.

For Beck and her husband, the major benefit was having more money for travel and other goals. Not having to make a house payment also meant that Beck could quit her full-time job and focus on marketing her app and running her own The Debt Myth website business.

While living mortgage-free may sound like an enviable goal, paying off your mortgage early isn’t always the best use of your money, says Todd Tresidder, a financial coach and author who publishes the website FinancialMentor.com. He was asked about the merits of paying off a mortgage early so many times by his readers and clients that he wrote up an exhaustive 5,200-word article, with charts, covering all the considerations.

The 140-character Twitter version: You might be better off putting your extra cash elsewhere, but the emotional payoff of being debt-free matters.

“The intuitive response is to get out of debt. We all want the security of owning our castle free and clear with one less expense to deal with. The prospect of making monthly payments for the next 30 years is antithetical to freedom,” Tresidder wrote. “However, there are times when intuition and finance disagree. … The correct answer is not cookie-cutter but must be custom fitted to your personal financial situation.”

If you have high-interest credit card or student loan debt, you’re much better off paying those off before making extra mortgage payments. Saving for your child’s college education and funding your 401(k) at least to the point of getting the maximum employer match – and maybe more – may also be more important than getting ahead on your mortgage.

Beyond that, you want to make sure you have enough cash on hand for emergencies because drawing from your home equity isn’t always easy. If your mortgage is underwater, or if you anticipate losing your house to foreclosure or short sale, making extra mortgage payments is just throwing money away.

The harder calculation is whether you’re better off investing your money or applying it toward your mortgage. When the market is strong (for whatever investment you’re making), you will likely earn much more on your investments than you are paying in interest on your mortgage. But if your investments lose money, you would have been better off applying that cash to your mortgage.

Many people aim to pay off their mortgages before they retire, but even that may not be the best move in all circumstances.

Having a mortgage does provide a tax break, but it’s not as good a benefit as many people think. According to an analysis of 2012 tax data by The Pew Charitable Trusts, just under 24 percent of tax filers claim the deduction. Many homeowners, even those who itemize, often find they do better on their taxes with the standard deduction.

For those homeowners who are fully funding their retirement accounts, are free of high-interest debt and have enough cash socked away for other life goals, here are eight simple ways to pay off your mortgage early.

Add something to every month’s payment. The advantage to extra payments is that all that money goes toward principal. Early in a mortgage, most of your regular payment goes toward interest. According to calculations by Bankrate.com, if you added an extra $100 to your payment of a new $100,000 30-year mortgage at 4.5 percent interest, you’d pay off the mortgage eight and a half years early and save more than $26,300 in interest.

Make a payment every two weeks. There are companies that volunteer to set this up for you, for a fee, but you can do it yourself for nothing. You’re effectively making a full extra payment each year. Paying half your mortgage payment every two weeks, on that same $100,000, 30-year mortgage at 4.5 percent, would cut just under 5.5 years off the term and save roughly $14,000, according to a calculator at The Mortgage Professor site run by Jack Guttentag. Splitting your mortgage payment into two pieces produces minimal savings.

Make extra payments whenever you can. Beck and her husband started by paying $35 extra per month, but then began making additional payments, at one point so eager to pay off the loan that they made eight payments in a month.

Make one extra payment a year. This provides about the same savings as making half a payment every two weeks. When you make the payment isn’t important. You could make it at the end of the year or wait until you get a tax refund or a bonus.

Refinance your mortgage to a lower rate, and keep making the higher payment. The amount this will save depends on the exact figures, but it should shave years off your mortgage and save you thousands in interest.

Refinance your mortgage to a shorter term. This cuts the amount of interest you pay significantly as well as getting you out of debt sooner.

Contribute funds from another source. Designate money from a bonus, odd jobs or freelance work toward paying of the mortgage. If your income is variable, rather than making regular additional payments toward principal, make one big payment when you can.

Cut expenses and put the savings toward your mortgage. Change to a cheaper cellphone plan, cut the cable cord or otherwise cut living expenses and devote that extra money to extra mortgage payments. Living a frugal lifestyle may be difficult in the moment, but it’s worth the struggle if your ultimate goal is to be debt-free.


8 Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier #100 #mortgage #financing


#pay off mortgage early

#

8 Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier

Adding about $100 to your monthly payment can shave thousands of dollars, and several years, off of your mortgage. (iStockPhoto)

The mortgage burning party may have gone the way of the rotary phone, but that doesn’t mean Americans don’t own their homes free and clear anymore. In fact, about 34 percent of homeowners in the U.S. no longer have a mortgage, according to U.S. Census data.

The stories of people who pay off 30-year mortgages after 30 years in the same home are indeed rarer than they once were. But the recent foreclosure crisis did serve as an incentive for homeowners to pay off their loans sooner rather than later – and some have actually given it a try.

Jackie Beck, creator of the Pay Off Debt app, and her husband paid their $95,000 home mortgage in less than three years. To finish off the mortgage, they repeated the same tactics they had used to vanquish their credit card, student loan and auto loan debt. The secret to their success? They started earning more money but didn’t increase their expenses, plus they were careful not to borrow any more money.

For Beck and her husband, the major benefit was having more money for travel and other goals. Not having to make a house payment also meant that Beck could quit her full-time job and focus on marketing her app and running her own The Debt Myth website business.

While living mortgage-free may sound like an enviable goal, paying off your mortgage early isn’t always the best use of your money, says Todd Tresidder, a financial coach and author who publishes the website FinancialMentor.com. He was asked about the merits of paying off a mortgage early so many times by his readers and clients that he wrote up an exhaustive 5,200-word article, with charts, covering all the considerations.

The 140-character Twitter version: You might be better off putting your extra cash elsewhere, but the emotional payoff of being debt-free matters.

“The intuitive response is to get out of debt. We all want the security of owning our castle free and clear with one less expense to deal with. The prospect of making monthly payments for the next 30 years is antithetical to freedom,” Tresidder wrote. “However, there are times when intuition and finance disagree. … The correct answer is not cookie-cutter but must be custom fitted to your personal financial situation.”

If you have high-interest credit card or student loan debt, you’re much better off paying those off before making extra mortgage payments. Saving for your child’s college education and funding your 401(k) at least to the point of getting the maximum employer match – and maybe more – may also be more important than getting ahead on your mortgage.

Beyond that, you want to make sure you have enough cash on hand for emergencies because drawing from your home equity isn’t always easy. If your mortgage is underwater, or if you anticipate losing your house to foreclosure or short sale, making extra mortgage payments is just throwing money away.

The harder calculation is whether you’re better off investing your money or applying it toward your mortgage. When the market is strong (for whatever investment you’re making), you will likely earn much more on your investments than you are paying in interest on your mortgage. But if your investments lose money, you would have been better off applying that cash to your mortgage.

Many people aim to pay off their mortgages before they retire, but even that may not be the best move in all circumstances.

Having a mortgage does provide a tax break, but it’s not as good a benefit as many people think. According to an analysis of 2012 tax data by The Pew Charitable Trusts, just under 24 percent of tax filers claim the deduction. Many homeowners, even those who itemize, often find they do better on their taxes with the standard deduction.

For those homeowners who are fully funding their retirement accounts, are free of high-interest debt and have enough cash socked away for other life goals, here are eight simple ways to pay off your mortgage early.

Add something to every month’s payment. The advantage to extra payments is that all that money goes toward principal. Early in a mortgage, most of your regular payment goes toward interest. According to calculations by Bankrate.com, if you added an extra $100 to your payment of a new $100,000 30-year mortgage at 4.5 percent interest, you’d pay off the mortgage eight and a half years early and save more than $26,300 in interest.

Make a payment every two weeks. There are companies that volunteer to set this up for you, for a fee, but you can do it yourself for nothing. You’re effectively making a full extra payment each year. Paying half your mortgage payment every two weeks, on that same $100,000, 30-year mortgage at 4.5 percent, would cut just under 5.5 years off the term and save roughly $14,000, according to a calculator at The Mortgage Professor site run by Jack Guttentag. Splitting your mortgage payment into two pieces produces minimal savings.

Make extra payments whenever you can. Beck and her husband started by paying $35 extra per month, but then began making additional payments, at one point so eager to pay off the loan that they made eight payments in a month.

Make one extra payment a year. This provides about the same savings as making half a payment every two weeks. When you make the payment isn’t important. You could make it at the end of the year or wait until you get a tax refund or a bonus.

Refinance your mortgage to a lower rate, and keep making the higher payment. The amount this will save depends on the exact figures, but it should shave years off your mortgage and save you thousands in interest.

Refinance your mortgage to a shorter term. This cuts the amount of interest you pay significantly as well as getting you out of debt sooner.

Contribute funds from another source. Designate money from a bonus, odd jobs or freelance work toward paying of the mortgage. If your income is variable, rather than making regular additional payments toward principal, make one big payment when you can.

Cut expenses and put the savings toward your mortgage. Change to a cheaper cellphone plan, cut the cable cord or otherwise cut living expenses and devote that extra money to extra mortgage payments. Living a frugal lifestyle may be difficult in the moment, but it’s worth the struggle if your ultimate goal is to be debt-free.


Michigan DUI Lawyer – Michigan DUI Attorney – Jeffrey Randa, Home #dui #lawyers, #jeffrey #randa


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DRIVER’S LICENSE RESTORATION

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A good strategy can make a huge difference right away.

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  • Lost your Michigan Driver’s License? As an experienced Michigan drivers license attorney, I’ll get you back on the road – Guaranteed .
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Michigan DUI and Driver s License Restoration Attorney

If you’ve lost your driver’s license for multiple DUI’s, I will win it back for you. I will represent you before the Michigan Secretary of State’s Administrative Hearing Section (AHS – formerly known as the DAAD) and win your Michigan driver’s license reinstatement appeal or clear the Michigan license revocation (hold) on your driving record, no matter where in the world you live. When I’m done, you will be able to drive again, legally!

If you live out of state, I will win the clearance of the Secretary of State’s hold on your driving record. In my role as a Michigan driver s license restoration lawyer, I have developed a proven, winning system to get you back on the road, and I back up my promises with a first-time win guarantee in every Michigan license restoration or clearance appeal case I take. This means there’s no risk – you’ll only pay once to win your clearance or get your license back.

A DUI case case in the Greater Detroit (Tri-County) area is different than one being heard in some distant Michigan Court. This is why I handle drinking and driving charges primarily in Macomb, Oakland and Wayne Counties. If you have been charged with a DUI anywhere in Metro Detroit, you need a lawyer who regularly handles DUI cases in the court where you ll be appearing, and who can tell you what will happen where your case is pending. Because I practice in front of the same local Judges day-in and day-out, I know how things work, and can offer clear answers to your questions and a winning strategy based upon more than 25 years of real world experience.

An experienced Michigan DUI attorney knows that Michigan OWI cases are won or lost based upon the evidence. If it was obtained illegally, then I’ll keep it out of court. Even if the DUI case against you is rock solid, I know how to work things to get a better result. Having over 25 years’ experience as a DUI lawyer defending people in the courtroom, I will always the best outcome possible in your case, wherever in the Detroit area it is pending. Knowledge is power, but all that experience means knowing how to use it for your advantage.

Whether your DUI charge is a 1st offense. 2nd offense or even a 3rd offense (felony). I will protect you. Good results are the product of good work, not good luck. I will fight for you and help save your driver’s license, your job, and your freedom so that you keep your life intact. Call me so that we can begin putting together a winning strategy in your case.

There is no office you can call that is more helpful or nicer than mine. My Staff and I are friendly, outgoing, and down to earth. Whether you’re looking to put a valid driver’s license back in your wallet, or you need to hire a local, Detroit-area DUI or criminal attorney, we do consultations over the phone, right when you call. We ll be glad to answer your questions honestly and explain things, without any gimmicks, tricks, or high pressure tactics.

When your future is at stake and results matter, contact my office at (586) 465-1980. We’re here to help, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.


Securities Fraud Attorney – Stockbroker Fraud Lawyer – Investment Fraud Attorney – Serving the USA


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Nationwide Securities Fraud – Stockbroker Fraud – Investment Fraud Attorney

Our securities fraud attorneys and staff have more than 100 years of combined experience in the securities industry and in securities law. Several of our firm’s attorneys served as a vice president or as compliance officers of one or more major brokerage firms. Our experienced team is devoted to assisting institutional and individual investors nationwide to recover losses caused by the inappropriate actions of investment advisors and their firms. We offer a free consultation to those who contact us through our Website. Se habla espa ol. We have extensive experience representing investors outside the United States with claims against U.S. based investment firms.

Daily Headlines: “Wall Street Fraud!”Millions of Investors Have Lost Their Life Savings and Retirement Assets!

Yet, property invested, any losses would have been small. Many investors’ lives were destroyed because brokerage firms lied to their clients (and brokers) or other misconduct or negligence by the firm or broker. It is wrong when life savings are lost through unsuitable high risk stocks, options, mutual funds – or even annuities or bonds! Margin borrowing often made the losses even greater. Some brokers and firms now blame investors for their own losses. Don’t be fooled by these tactics!

If you feel you may be a victim of Wall Street fraud or negligence contact our securities lawyers for a free consultation .

What is Broker Fraud?

“Broker fraud ” includes theft, lying and deceit, but it also includes other types of wrongdoing, such as churning, unauthorized transactions, unsuitable investments and other acts of greed, incompetence and negligence by stockbrokers, financial planners, and others in the securities industry. Learn more about common forms of broker misconduct .

There are regulations and laws written to protect investors. Securities regulators “police” the securities industry and issue fines and suspensions. To recover their losses investors must file claims for recovery. Statistics demonstrate that they are far more likely to recover if they are represented by experienced securities fraud lawyers. Since investors sign account documents at brokerage firms which almost always contain binding arbitration clauses, most claims against brokerage firms must be resolved in securities arbitration instead of court. Learn more about securities arbitration .

Securities Fraud Attorneys

Our primary goal is to represent investors who have lost their savings and retirement when their brokerage accounts were mishandled. Our securities fraud attorneys have represented thousands of clients nationwide who were victims of misrepresentations, commission churning, unsuitable investments, unauthorized transactions, execution failures, excessive mark-ups, disappearing funds, botched transfers, web-broker outages, “selling away” from firms, unregistered brokers, unregistered securities, improper margin liquidations, broker bribes, fraudulent research, “boiler room” sales practices and other wrongful acts. Those cases were concerning stocks, bonds, “penny” stocks, “junk” bonds, options, warrants, commodities, mutual funds, REIT’s, limited partnerships, derivative securities and other investments. We have also handled other types of cases for investors and minority shareholders. More about our firm .

Check out your stockbroker from our list of recent NASD enforcement actions. Click here to learn why the SEC doesn’t help defrauded investors and why you need to hire a securities lawyer to help you recover your losses.

Click here to learn about common mistakes that investors make when interacting with brokers after they suspect something is wrong.

Click here if you want to know how retirees are targets for unethical money managers. Here is some information about annuities. a prime investment product sold by stockbrokers in recent years partly because of the large commissions the sales generate.

Financial Representative Misconduct: Rep. Who Didn’t Disclose $100M in EB-5 Investment Sales is Barred From Securities Industry, Ex-Stifel, Nicolaus Broker is Suspended Fined For Variable Annuity Violations, and Former Advisor is In Trouble Over Alleged Breaches Involving Senior Investors Accounts

Former Stifel, Nicolaus Broker is Accused of Variable Annuity Violations The Financial Industry

  • NY Man is Charged in $70M Investor Fraud In yet another investor fraud case in which the alleged fraudsters touted the sale of tickets from
  • Judge Stops $16 Million Interest Payment on COFINA bonds in Puerto Rico Bankruptcy In Manhattan federal court, U.S. District Judge Laura Taylor Swain has blocked a $16.3 million
  • Securities Fraud Cases: Ponzi Scam Operator Sentenced to Prison, Fund Manager Pleads Guilty, Ex-Options Trading Instructor Allegedly Misappropriated Investor Funds, $1.7M Financial Scam Leads to 10-Years Behind Bars

    SEC Charges Man Accused of Running $10M Ponzi Scam Mark Anderson Jones, whom the US Securities and

  • Massachusetts Hedge Fund Manager Faces Criminal and Civil Fraud Charges Over Alleged Multi-Million Dollar Ponzi Scam Over the weekend, Yasuna Murakami, a Cambridge-Massachusetts based hedge fund manager, was arrested

  • Here’s 222 years of interest rate history on one chart #mortgage #repayment #calculator


    #interest rates history

    #

    Here’s 222 years of interest rate history on one chart Talking Numbers Wednesday, September 18, 2013
    Lawrence Lewitinn

    Legendary technical analyst Louise Yamada looks at two centuries of US interest rate cycles and says we’re at a generational bottom.

    How far back should you go to chart interest rates if you want to know what kind of cycle we’re in?

    Since this is Chart Week on Talking Numbers, let’s take it up a notch: How about since the 1790s? That’s exactly what Louise Yamada did for us. The founder of Louise Yamada Technical Research Advisors went back to the early days of the republic to see if there are any patterns to interest rates and what they can tell us about what’s next.

    And, Yamada says now will see the start of higher interest rates for the next couple of decades.

    Charting 222 years of US interest rates, Yamada see seven completed major periods lasting between 22 and 37 years. Three periods had rising interest rates and four had falling interest rates. She sees now as the start of the eighth period, which makes it the fourth rising interest rates cycle in American history.

    For more recent data (1977 to today), Yamada uses the yearly close for the 30-Year Treasury bond. For data from 1790 to 1976, she uses prime corporate bond rates. All of her data are in nominal terms (that is, not adjusted down during inflationary periods or up during deflationary periods).

    These interest rates are indeed interesting. For example, the average rate has been 5.18% since the start of this country’s history. “Any time we break above it, we get into trouble,” says Yamada.

    When rates broke above 5% in the early 1970s, it began a sharp steep rise in rates coupled with inflation. The same was true in during the unstable 1790s and for a short time leading up to 1860. Rates didn’t break much above 5% in 1920; they stayed between 4% and 5% during the Roaring ‘20s only to sharply decline during the Great Depression.

    And, while interest rates sharply reverse from its peaks, Yamada sees a two- to 14-year base of support for interest rates at the bottoms. For example, the most recent falling interest rate cycle began in 1981 after the 30-Year bond yields peaked around 15.2%.

    Since then, “interest rates made lower highs until 2008,” notes Yamada.

    Now, however, Yamada believes interest rates have formed their base and a reversal is in order.

    Where does Yamada see coming up for interest rates and bonds given two centuries of history as a guide? Watch the video above to see how long-term technical analysis can give an indication of where nearer-term rates may be headed.

    More from Talking Numbers:


    Here’s 222 years of interest rate history on one chart #historical #mortgage #rates


    #interest rates history

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    Here’s 222 years of interest rate history on one chart Talking Numbers Wednesday, September 18, 2013
    Lawrence Lewitinn

    Legendary technical analyst Louise Yamada looks at two centuries of US interest rate cycles and says we’re at a generational bottom.

    How far back should you go to chart interest rates if you want to know what kind of cycle we’re in?

    Since this is Chart Week on Talking Numbers, let’s take it up a notch: How about since the 1790s? That’s exactly what Louise Yamada did for us. The founder of Louise Yamada Technical Research Advisors went back to the early days of the republic to see if there are any patterns to interest rates and what they can tell us about what’s next.

    And, Yamada says now will see the start of higher interest rates for the next couple of decades.

    Charting 222 years of US interest rates, Yamada see seven completed major periods lasting between 22 and 37 years. Three periods had rising interest rates and four had falling interest rates. She sees now as the start of the eighth period, which makes it the fourth rising interest rates cycle in American history.

    For more recent data (1977 to today), Yamada uses the yearly close for the 30-Year Treasury bond. For data from 1790 to 1976, she uses prime corporate bond rates. All of her data are in nominal terms (that is, not adjusted down during inflationary periods or up during deflationary periods).

    These interest rates are indeed interesting. For example, the average rate has been 5.18% since the start of this country’s history. “Any time we break above it, we get into trouble,” says Yamada.

    When rates broke above 5% in the early 1970s, it began a sharp steep rise in rates coupled with inflation. The same was true in during the unstable 1790s and for a short time leading up to 1860. Rates didn’t break much above 5% in 1920; they stayed between 4% and 5% during the Roaring ‘20s only to sharply decline during the Great Depression.

    And, while interest rates sharply reverse from its peaks, Yamada sees a two- to 14-year base of support for interest rates at the bottoms. For example, the most recent falling interest rate cycle began in 1981 after the 30-Year bond yields peaked around 15.2%.

    Since then, “interest rates made lower highs until 2008,” notes Yamada.

    Now, however, Yamada believes interest rates have formed their base and a reversal is in order.

    Where does Yamada see coming up for interest rates and bonds given two centuries of history as a guide? Watch the video above to see how long-term technical analysis can give an indication of where nearer-term rates may be headed.

    More from Talking Numbers:


    Here’s 222 years of interest rate history on one chart #mortgage #estimate


    #interest rates history

    #

    Here’s 222 years of interest rate history on one chart Talking Numbers Wednesday, September 18, 2013
    Lawrence Lewitinn

    Legendary technical analyst Louise Yamada looks at two centuries of US interest rate cycles and says we’re at a generational bottom.

    How far back should you go to chart interest rates if you want to know what kind of cycle we’re in?

    Since this is Chart Week on Talking Numbers, let’s take it up a notch: How about since the 1790s? That’s exactly what Louise Yamada did for us. The founder of Louise Yamada Technical Research Advisors went back to the early days of the republic to see if there are any patterns to interest rates and what they can tell us about what’s next.

    And, Yamada says now will see the start of higher interest rates for the next couple of decades.

    Charting 222 years of US interest rates, Yamada see seven completed major periods lasting between 22 and 37 years. Three periods had rising interest rates and four had falling interest rates. She sees now as the start of the eighth period, which makes it the fourth rising interest rates cycle in American history.

    For more recent data (1977 to today), Yamada uses the yearly close for the 30-Year Treasury bond. For data from 1790 to 1976, she uses prime corporate bond rates. All of her data are in nominal terms (that is, not adjusted down during inflationary periods or up during deflationary periods).

    These interest rates are indeed interesting. For example, the average rate has been 5.18% since the start of this country’s history. “Any time we break above it, we get into trouble,” says Yamada.

    When rates broke above 5% in the early 1970s, it began a sharp steep rise in rates coupled with inflation. The same was true in during the unstable 1790s and for a short time leading up to 1860. Rates didn’t break much above 5% in 1920; they stayed between 4% and 5% during the Roaring ‘20s only to sharply decline during the Great Depression.

    And, while interest rates sharply reverse from its peaks, Yamada sees a two- to 14-year base of support for interest rates at the bottoms. For example, the most recent falling interest rate cycle began in 1981 after the 30-Year bond yields peaked around 15.2%.

    Since then, “interest rates made lower highs until 2008,” notes Yamada.

    Now, however, Yamada believes interest rates have formed their base and a reversal is in order.

    Where does Yamada see coming up for interest rates and bonds given two centuries of history as a guide? Watch the video above to see how long-term technical analysis can give an indication of where nearer-term rates may be headed.

    More from Talking Numbers:


    8 Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier #mortgage #costs


    #pay off mortgage early

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    8 Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier

    Adding about $100 to your monthly payment can shave thousands of dollars, and several years, off of your mortgage. (iStockPhoto)

    The mortgage burning party may have gone the way of the rotary phone, but that doesn’t mean Americans don’t own their homes free and clear anymore. In fact, about 34 percent of homeowners in the U.S. no longer have a mortgage, according to U.S. Census data.

    The stories of people who pay off 30-year mortgages after 30 years in the same home are indeed rarer than they once were. But the recent foreclosure crisis did serve as an incentive for homeowners to pay off their loans sooner rather than later – and some have actually given it a try.

    Jackie Beck, creator of the Pay Off Debt app, and her husband paid their $95,000 home mortgage in less than three years. To finish off the mortgage, they repeated the same tactics they had used to vanquish their credit card, student loan and auto loan debt. The secret to their success? They started earning more money but didn’t increase their expenses, plus they were careful not to borrow any more money.

    For Beck and her husband, the major benefit was having more money for travel and other goals. Not having to make a house payment also meant that Beck could quit her full-time job and focus on marketing her app and running her own The Debt Myth website business.

    While living mortgage-free may sound like an enviable goal, paying off your mortgage early isn’t always the best use of your money, says Todd Tresidder, a financial coach and author who publishes the website FinancialMentor.com. He was asked about the merits of paying off a mortgage early so many times by his readers and clients that he wrote up an exhaustive 5,200-word article, with charts, covering all the considerations.

    The 140-character Twitter version: You might be better off putting your extra cash elsewhere, but the emotional payoff of being debt-free matters.

    “The intuitive response is to get out of debt. We all want the security of owning our castle free and clear with one less expense to deal with. The prospect of making monthly payments for the next 30 years is antithetical to freedom,” Tresidder wrote. “However, there are times when intuition and finance disagree. … The correct answer is not cookie-cutter but must be custom fitted to your personal financial situation.”

    If you have high-interest credit card or student loan debt, you’re much better off paying those off before making extra mortgage payments. Saving for your child’s college education and funding your 401(k) at least to the point of getting the maximum employer match – and maybe more – may also be more important than getting ahead on your mortgage.

    Beyond that, you want to make sure you have enough cash on hand for emergencies because drawing from your home equity isn’t always easy. If your mortgage is underwater, or if you anticipate losing your house to foreclosure or short sale, making extra mortgage payments is just throwing money away.

    The harder calculation is whether you’re better off investing your money or applying it toward your mortgage. When the market is strong (for whatever investment you’re making), you will likely earn much more on your investments than you are paying in interest on your mortgage. But if your investments lose money, you would have been better off applying that cash to your mortgage.

    Many people aim to pay off their mortgages before they retire, but even that may not be the best move in all circumstances.

    Having a mortgage does provide a tax break, but it’s not as good a benefit as many people think. According to an analysis of 2012 tax data by The Pew Charitable Trusts, just under 24 percent of tax filers claim the deduction. Many homeowners, even those who itemize, often find they do better on their taxes with the standard deduction.

    For those homeowners who are fully funding their retirement accounts, are free of high-interest debt and have enough cash socked away for other life goals, here are eight simple ways to pay off your mortgage early.

    Add something to every month’s payment. The advantage to extra payments is that all that money goes toward principal. Early in a mortgage, most of your regular payment goes toward interest. According to calculations by Bankrate.com, if you added an extra $100 to your payment of a new $100,000 30-year mortgage at 4.5 percent interest, you’d pay off the mortgage eight and a half years early and save more than $26,300 in interest.

    Make a payment every two weeks. There are companies that volunteer to set this up for you, for a fee, but you can do it yourself for nothing. You’re effectively making a full extra payment each year. Paying half your mortgage payment every two weeks, on that same $100,000, 30-year mortgage at 4.5 percent, would cut just under 5.5 years off the term and save roughly $14,000, according to a calculator at The Mortgage Professor site run by Jack Guttentag. Splitting your mortgage payment into two pieces produces minimal savings.

    Make extra payments whenever you can. Beck and her husband started by paying $35 extra per month, but then began making additional payments, at one point so eager to pay off the loan that they made eight payments in a month.

    Make one extra payment a year. This provides about the same savings as making half a payment every two weeks. When you make the payment isn’t important. You could make it at the end of the year or wait until you get a tax refund or a bonus.

    Refinance your mortgage to a lower rate, and keep making the higher payment. The amount this will save depends on the exact figures, but it should shave years off your mortgage and save you thousands in interest.

    Refinance your mortgage to a shorter term. This cuts the amount of interest you pay significantly as well as getting you out of debt sooner.

    Contribute funds from another source. Designate money from a bonus, odd jobs or freelance work toward paying of the mortgage. If your income is variable, rather than making regular additional payments toward principal, make one big payment when you can.

    Cut expenses and put the savings toward your mortgage. Change to a cheaper cellphone plan, cut the cable cord or otherwise cut living expenses and devote that extra money to extra mortgage payments. Living a frugal lifestyle may be difficult in the moment, but it’s worth the struggle if your ultimate goal is to be debt-free.