Will Obama s latest mortgage refinance plan help you? CBS News #mortgage #rates #today


#obama mortgage

#

Will Obama’s latest mortgage refinance plan help you?

Will Obama’s mortgage refinance plan help you?

Dean Baker of the Center for Economic and Policy Research sits down with CBSNews.com deputy politics editor Corbett B. Daly to discuss the ins an.

President Obama on Monday announced new measures to help borrowers refinance their existing mortgages to new loans with lower interest rates and cheaper monthly payments.

The plan is an expansion of an existing program to help borrowers who are not behind on their payments but cannot refinance because they do not enough equity in their home. Or they might be underwater–which means they owe more than their home is worth.

“Right now, some underwater homeowners have no choice but to refinance with their original lender – which some lenders refuse to do,” Obama said in prepared remarks.

“These changes will encourage other lenders to compete for their business by offering better terms and rates, and eligible homeowners to shop around for the best ones,” he added.

But how many homeowners will it really help? And will it be enough to jumpstart the still struggling housing market?

Dean Baker is the Co-Director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research here in Washington, spoke with CBS News and said if 800,000 borrowers are able to refinance, that would be “very good.”

That would be a big help to those borrowers, but probably not enough to make much of a difference in the overall economy, he added.

Despite the relatively modest effect, Mr. Obama and his team recognize the president needs to be seen on television everyday as someone “trying to solve problems, said Larry Sabato, a politics professor at the University of Virginia.

“It’s a smart approach and long overdue,” Sabato said, noting that the administration is “out of time” as the presidential election is just a year away.

“They realize that Obama probably can’t get a Mother’s Day resolution passed through Congress,” so he has to move ahead with incremental measures that help pockets of Americans.

Housing analyst Edward Pinto stressed that the plan would mostly help borrowers who owe less than their mortgage, despite the repeated talked from White House officials that it is aimed at so-called “underwater” borrowers.

“I think it’s important not to get expectations up too high,” said Pinto, a fellow at the conservative American Enterprise Institute and a vocal critic of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two government sponsored entities that are backing the loans eligible for refinance under the Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP).

Pinto noted close to a million borrowers have gotten a HARP refinance loan since it was introduced two years ago, but only about 100,000 of them were borrowers who owed more than their house is worth. Without the HARP program, borrowers would have to owe less than 80 percent of the loan’s value to refinance, so the majority of borrowers who got new HARP loans were in that 80 to 100 percent range, Pinto said.

Even with the expanded program, “they are not going to help a million” more underwater borrowers, Pinto added.

2011 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.


Patty Will – American Mortgage Service Company #easy #mortgage #calculator


#american mortgage

#

About Me

Patty has been in the mortgage business in the greater Lafayette area for the past 19 years. In addition to Conventional, VA, USDA, and FHA loans, she specializes in first-time-homebuyer loans, loans to customers with less than perfect credit and rehabilitation loans.

As a graduate of Purdue University, Patty attributes her success to her ability to personally connect with people from all walks of life. She has empathy to those who have had hard times-yet the ability to be straight forward about the reality of their situation; and most importantly, how to get them to where they want to be in the near or distant future.

Patty s level of commitment, professionalism, responsiveness, along with her attitude of excellence has earned her the respect and loyalty of many of the area s top real estate agents and builders. Patty, with the support of Sara Yost, her full time assistant, and Dana Thomas, an exceptional loan processor, is able to stand behind her commitments to her customers, builders and Realtors and deliver a hassle free, timely closing, as promised.

Patty is the mother of four boys. Three are grown and one teenager still at home. She and her husband, Scott, live in West Lafayette. She spends her free time watching Purdue sports, her youngest son play baseball, and gardening.

Do you have questions? Contact me. Apply Now


Mortgage Trends – Where Will Rates Go From Here #rate #mortgage


#mortgage trends

#

Mortgage Trends

Anyone who is considering the idea of purchasing a home these days will naturally try to fathom whatever direction the trends in mortgages may try and take. Tracking any sort of pattern in these tough economic times is difficult if not impossible. Along with the after-effects of a dismal housing market climate in general, potential home-buyers might just as well resort to a crystal ball or the roll of a dice to zero in on any accurate forecast. It is widely felt that mortgage rates should continue at or below 5% for a greater part of 2012, and perhaps for the whole year, which is simply an ongoing scenario seen in much of 2011 as well. The across-the-board interest rates for 30 year fixed mortgage rates hovered on the underside of 5% for the preceding year, though the 4% range became a reality for a while in the last quarter. Economists at organizations such as the Mortgage Bankers Association predict that these same mortgage rates will hold at the same level for 2012. In other words, unchanged.

Today s Mortgage Rates

When compared to rates over a longer historical period, there is no doubt that today’s mortgage interest rates are indeed at a notably low level. This is certainly a boon to any prospective homeowner planning to acquire a mortgage anytime in the upcoming year. The down-side of this is quite a few potential borrowers may have trouble qualifying for these low rates. This is simply because it is much more difficult to meet the newer and more rigorous credit standards as a result of the housing crisis in general. This factor is also expected to be a major characteristic of the ‘trend’ in mortgage rates for the coming year as well. Based on this outlook, prospective home-buyers with less-than-optimum credit standings. extreme levels of debt obligations, or even unpredictable employment security should undoubtedly have difficulty acquiring a housing loan during 2012 due to much more meticulous lending constraints and oversight.

Current Mortgage Requirements

The requirements a potential borrower will need to be eligible for a mortgage in 2012 will be quite detailed. They will need to be very thorough in providing sufficient background material. They should also be prepared to meet the more rigorous requirements of having credit ratings at a minimum of 600 or higher, depending on the lending institution. In addition, there will be greater scrutiny with regard to documented proof of employment steadiness and security as well as verifiable income levels. Debt obligation levels are required to fall within certain percentages in relation to a home-buyer total income.

The Reality of the Current Mortgage Environment

As an ongoing after-effect of the housing crisis of 2008, there will be fewer mortgaging options for home-buyers in the coming year, leaving the more ‘exotic’ type of lending methods a thing of the past. One form of collateral damage caused by the crisis has been the ‘stated income’ loans, which permitted potential buyers to rely on undocumented income statements to acquire loan approval. Likewise, the identical treatment will be extended toward ‘no-doc’ mortgages, where the lender will request far more detailed information regarding employment, income, assets, and debt standings than was required in the recent past. Piggy-back mortgages have also gone the way of the chopping block in many states, which were utilized when a borrower combined two mortgage loans to avoid paying the private mortgage insurance (PMI) requirements on the loan.

The potential home buyer looking to secure a mortgage loan needs to possess a good bit of insight and instinct to understand not only the trends in the local mortgage market, but those that affect the national mortgage market as well. Each of these have a direct impact on the prevailing interest rates. Careful and diligent research via numerous online sites should provide adequate information regarding the current mortgage trends and lending practices in a borrower’s desired market. No amount of investigation or thoughtful planning is wasted in this all-important milestone for acquiring the best possible mortgage at the most favorable rates.


What a mortgage lender will lend you – How to get the best mortgage deal


#best mortgage lender

#

How to get the best mortgage deal What a mortgage lender will lend you

Mortgage deals let you borrow up to a percentage of the property’s value

Find out what percentage of a property’s value you’re likely to be able to borrow when you take out a mortgage.

Lenders use affordability calculations to figure out what they will lend to you. This involves them looking at your income and outgoings to work out how much you can afford to pay back.

This will typically work out to be between three and five times your income – although they will also look at other things such as whether you would still be able to afford the loan if interest rates increased.

You can visit the mortgage calculators offered by Which? Mortgage Advisers, our impartial mortgage broking service. to get an idea of what you will typically be able to borrow from a mortgage lender.

  • Call Which? Mortgage Advisers on 0808 252 7987 for personal, impartial advice on the best mortgage deal for your personal circumstances

What percentage can you borrow?

The ‘loan-to-value’ or LTV is the amount you are borrowing in relation to the cost of the property you are buying. It’s expressed as a percentage of the property’s value. So, if you are buying a property for £200,000 and borrowing £180,000, your LTV is 90%.

All deals allow borrowing up to a maximum LTV – 75% or 90%, for example. In general, the lower your LTV, the lower the mortgage rate and the cheaper the deal overall you will be able to get.

Go further: Which? Money Compare tables – compare some of the best deals on the market

Higher-lending charges

If you’re putting down a deposit of 25% or less, you might have to pay a higher-lending charge (HLC), which can amount to hundreds or even thousands of pounds.

These charges are typically used by the lender to buy insurance to protect itself against you defaulting on your repayments. They usually apply to high-LTV mortgages as the higher the LTV, the more likely it is that you will default. However, most lenders no longer charge them.

HLCs are normally calculated as a percentage of the portion of the loan in excess of 75% of the property’s value. So, if you are borrowing £180,000 to buy a house costing £200,000 (90% LTV), you’ll pay an HLC on £30,000.

A typical charge might be 6% of this amount so you would pay £1,800.

You should factor in the cost of higher-lending charges when choosing your mortgage. Avoid adding the charge to your mortgage, if possible, as you will end up paying interest on it for the life of the loan.

For more on mortgage fees. see the next page of this guide.

Need a mortgage?

Working out how much a mortgage lender will lend you can be tricky and will be based on your personal circumstances.

Our independent mortgage advice service, Which? Mortgage Advisers. takes the time to understand your circumstances and guide you through the whole journey to make it as stress free as possible. Call one of our expert advisers on 0808 252 7987 .

More on this.

Your home may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage.

Which? Limited (registered in England and Wales number 00677665) is an Introducer Appointed Representative of Which? Financial Services Limited (registered in England and Wales number 07239342). Which? Financial Services Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FRN 527029). Which? Mortgage Advisers and Which? Money Compare are trading names of Which? Financial Services Limited. Registered office: 2 Marylebone Road, London NW1 4DF.

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Which? works for you Which? 2016


Will Obama s latest mortgage refinance plan help you? CBS News #houston #mortgage #rates


#obama mortgage

#

Will Obama’s latest mortgage refinance plan help you?

Will Obama’s mortgage refinance plan help you?

Dean Baker of the Center for Economic and Policy Research sits down with CBSNews.com deputy politics editor Corbett B. Daly to discuss the ins an.

President Obama on Monday announced new measures to help borrowers refinance their existing mortgages to new loans with lower interest rates and cheaper monthly payments.

The plan is an expansion of an existing program to help borrowers who are not behind on their payments but cannot refinance because they do not enough equity in their home. Or they might be underwater–which means they owe more than their home is worth.

“Right now, some underwater homeowners have no choice but to refinance with their original lender – which some lenders refuse to do,” Obama said in prepared remarks.

“These changes will encourage other lenders to compete for their business by offering better terms and rates, and eligible homeowners to shop around for the best ones,” he added.

But how many homeowners will it really help? And will it be enough to jumpstart the still struggling housing market?

Dean Baker is the Co-Director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research here in Washington, spoke with CBS News and said if 800,000 borrowers are able to refinance, that would be “very good.”

That would be a big help to those borrowers, but probably not enough to make much of a difference in the overall economy, he added.

Despite the relatively modest effect, Mr. Obama and his team recognize the president needs to be seen on television everyday as someone “trying to solve problems, said Larry Sabato, a politics professor at the University of Virginia.

“It’s a smart approach and long overdue,” Sabato said, noting that the administration is “out of time” as the presidential election is just a year away.

“They realize that Obama probably can’t get a Mother’s Day resolution passed through Congress,” so he has to move ahead with incremental measures that help pockets of Americans.

Housing analyst Edward Pinto stressed that the plan would mostly help borrowers who owe less than their mortgage, despite the repeated talked from White House officials that it is aimed at so-called “underwater” borrowers.

“I think it’s important not to get expectations up too high,” said Pinto, a fellow at the conservative American Enterprise Institute and a vocal critic of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two government sponsored entities that are backing the loans eligible for refinance under the Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP).

Pinto noted close to a million borrowers have gotten a HARP refinance loan since it was introduced two years ago, but only about 100,000 of them were borrowers who owed more than their house is worth. Without the HARP program, borrowers would have to owe less than 80 percent of the loan’s value to refinance, so the majority of borrowers who got new HARP loans were in that 80 to 100 percent range, Pinto said.

Even with the expanded program, “they are not going to help a million” more underwater borrowers, Pinto added.

2011 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.


How much will a new mortgage cost? Calculate and compare mortgage payments online with the


#www.mortgage calculator

#

Basic Mortgage Calculator

How much will a new mortgage cost? Calculate and compare mortgage payments online with the mortgage calculator. Simply manipulate any of the variables including loan amount, interest rate, down payment and term to calculate different scenarios.

It’s very important to remember that the total cost of home ownership is never just the mortgage payment however. From property taxes, home insurance to general maintenance the actual cost of owning a home can often be 50% or more on top of your mortgage payment. Learn more about buying a home and how to save money on your next mortgage by reading the topics below.

How much does to cost to buy a home?

Many first time home buyers believe the cost of buying a home is simply the down payment and some closing cost fees and while they may be technically right the true cost of home ownership is far greater. Buying a home is quite possibly the biggest financial responsibility most families take on and before committing to a mortgage loan for 30 years! It would be a very good idea to consider the full cost of owning a home. Home ownership is not just about paying a mortgage but also about maintaining the home, furnishing the home, paying property taxes, utilities and more.

Property Taxes

Homeowners in America are obligated to pay an annual property tax according to a percentage of the assessed value of the home. This is vastly different than some countries where you simply pay a one-time tax upon title transfer. Depending on where you live property taxes can equal up to 2% or more of your property value. This may not sound like much but it certainly is. For example, in some Florida counties, if your property value is $500,000 then you have to pay almost $10,000 annually just in real estate tax. That’s over $800 a month – before you even make a mortgage payment!

Home Insurance

Homeowners insurance is widely available but even with such a competitive market this doesn’t mean it’s cheap. There are different types of home insurance including flood insurance, hazard insurance and more. While many homeowners simply have a general house insurance policy some are obligated to purchase special types of insurance depending where the property is located. What happens if you don’t want it? The mortgage company will often buy it on your behalf and then bill you up to 3 times the cost or more, citing they had to buy it from some kind of unique provider which they probably own. Home insurance is not optional if you have a mortgage so it’s important to include this in your budget.

Cable, Utilities and Stuff

Those little things which make life easier add up pretty quick once you become a homeowner. Living with your parents or renting an apartment can have its advantages and one of those is often the inclusion of such bills. When you grow up and live on your own there is no imaginary credit card that pays these bills.

Home Furnishings

Buying your first home is a great feeling but as soon as you open the door it’s easy to become overwhelmed. For some people all their prior belongings can fit in the spare bedroom which means you have a big empty to space to buy stuff for. Shopping at IKEA and Home Depot will actually end up being exciting but this is the time when you will need cash. Stretching every last dollar to just buy the home and make the mortgage payment doesn’t do a lot for your lifestyle unless you think eating dinner on the floor is cool.

There are ups and downs to every real estate transaction and buying a home is certainly a great investment long term but you do need to have a sound financial plan in place. No one wants to end up being house poor; it just is never as fun.


Will Obama s latest mortgage refinance plan help you? CBS News #business #mortgage #rates


#obama mortgage

#

Will Obama’s latest mortgage refinance plan help you?

Will Obama’s mortgage refinance plan help you?

Dean Baker of the Center for Economic and Policy Research sits down with CBSNews.com deputy politics editor Corbett B. Daly to discuss the ins an.

President Obama on Monday announced new measures to help borrowers refinance their existing mortgages to new loans with lower interest rates and cheaper monthly payments.

The plan is an expansion of an existing program to help borrowers who are not behind on their payments but cannot refinance because they do not enough equity in their home. Or they might be underwater–which means they owe more than their home is worth.

“Right now, some underwater homeowners have no choice but to refinance with their original lender – which some lenders refuse to do,” Obama said in prepared remarks.

“These changes will encourage other lenders to compete for their business by offering better terms and rates, and eligible homeowners to shop around for the best ones,” he added.

But how many homeowners will it really help? And will it be enough to jumpstart the still struggling housing market?

Dean Baker is the Co-Director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research here in Washington, spoke with CBS News and said if 800,000 borrowers are able to refinance, that would be “very good.”

That would be a big help to those borrowers, but probably not enough to make much of a difference in the overall economy, he added.

Despite the relatively modest effect, Mr. Obama and his team recognize the president needs to be seen on television everyday as someone “trying to solve problems, said Larry Sabato, a politics professor at the University of Virginia.

“It’s a smart approach and long overdue,” Sabato said, noting that the administration is “out of time” as the presidential election is just a year away.

“They realize that Obama probably can’t get a Mother’s Day resolution passed through Congress,” so he has to move ahead with incremental measures that help pockets of Americans.

Housing analyst Edward Pinto stressed that the plan would mostly help borrowers who owe less than their mortgage, despite the repeated talked from White House officials that it is aimed at so-called “underwater” borrowers.

“I think it’s important not to get expectations up too high,” said Pinto, a fellow at the conservative American Enterprise Institute and a vocal critic of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two government sponsored entities that are backing the loans eligible for refinance under the Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP).

Pinto noted close to a million borrowers have gotten a HARP refinance loan since it was introduced two years ago, but only about 100,000 of them were borrowers who owed more than their house is worth. Without the HARP program, borrowers would have to owe less than 80 percent of the loan’s value to refinance, so the majority of borrowers who got new HARP loans were in that 80 to 100 percent range, Pinto said.

Even with the expanded program, “they are not going to help a million” more underwater borrowers, Pinto added.

2011 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.


What a mortgage lender will lend you – How to get the best mortgage deal


#best mortgage lender

#

How to get the best mortgage deal What a mortgage lender will lend you

Mortgage deals let you borrow up to a percentage of the property’s value

Find out what percentage of a property’s value you’re likely to be able to borrow when you take out a mortgage.

Lenders use affordability calculations to figure out what they will lend to you. This involves them looking at your income and outgoings to work out how much you can afford to pay back.

This will typically work out to be between three and five times your income – although they will also look at other things such as whether you would still be able to afford the loan if interest rates increased.

You can visit the mortgage calculators offered by Which? Mortgage Advisers, our impartial mortgage broking service. to get an idea of what you will typically be able to borrow from a mortgage lender.

  • Call Which? Mortgage Advisers on 0808 252 7987 for personal, impartial advice on the best mortgage deal for your personal circumstances

What percentage can you borrow?

The ‘loan-to-value’ or LTV is the amount you are borrowing in relation to the cost of the property you are buying. It’s expressed as a percentage of the property’s value. So, if you are buying a property for £200,000 and borrowing £180,000, your LTV is 90%.

All deals allow borrowing up to a maximum LTV – 75% or 90%, for example. In general, the lower your LTV, the lower the mortgage rate and the cheaper the deal overall you will be able to get.

Go further: Which? Money Compare tables – compare some of the best deals on the market

Higher-lending charges

If you’re putting down a deposit of 25% or less, you might have to pay a higher-lending charge (HLC), which can amount to hundreds or even thousands of pounds.

These charges are typically used by the lender to buy insurance to protect itself against you defaulting on your repayments. They usually apply to high-LTV mortgages as the higher the LTV, the more likely it is that you will default. However, most lenders no longer charge them.

HLCs are normally calculated as a percentage of the portion of the loan in excess of 75% of the property’s value. So, if you are borrowing £180,000 to buy a house costing £200,000 (90% LTV), you’ll pay an HLC on £30,000.

A typical charge might be 6% of this amount so you would pay £1,800.

You should factor in the cost of higher-lending charges when choosing your mortgage. Avoid adding the charge to your mortgage, if possible, as you will end up paying interest on it for the life of the loan.

For more on mortgage fees. see the next page of this guide.

Need a mortgage?

Working out how much a mortgage lender will lend you can be tricky and will be based on your personal circumstances.

Our independent mortgage advice service, Which? Mortgage Advisers. takes the time to understand your circumstances and guide you through the whole journey to make it as stress free as possible. Call one of our expert advisers on 0808 252 7987 .

More on this.

Your home may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage.

Which? Limited (registered in England and Wales number 00677665) is an Introducer Appointed Representative of Which? Financial Services Limited (registered in England and Wales number 07239342). Which? Financial Services Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FRN 527029). Which? Mortgage Advisers and Which? Money Compare are trading names of Which? Financial Services Limited. Registered office: 2 Marylebone Road, London NW1 4DF.

Footer Navigation

Which? works for you Which? 2016


Mortgage Trends – Where Will Rates Go From Here #canada #mortgage


#mortgage trends

#

Mortgage Trends

Anyone who is considering the idea of purchasing a home these days will naturally try to fathom whatever direction the trends in mortgages may try and take. Tracking any sort of pattern in these tough economic times is difficult if not impossible. Along with the after-effects of a dismal housing market climate in general, potential home-buyers might just as well resort to a crystal ball or the roll of a dice to zero in on any accurate forecast. It is widely felt that mortgage rates should continue at or below 5% for a greater part of 2012, and perhaps for the whole year, which is simply an ongoing scenario seen in much of 2011 as well. The across-the-board interest rates for 30 year fixed mortgage rates hovered on the underside of 5% for the preceding year, though the 4% range became a reality for a while in the last quarter. Economists at organizations such as the Mortgage Bankers Association predict that these same mortgage rates will hold at the same level for 2012. In other words, unchanged.

Today s Mortgage Rates

When compared to rates over a longer historical period, there is no doubt that today’s mortgage interest rates are indeed at a notably low level. This is certainly a boon to any prospective homeowner planning to acquire a mortgage anytime in the upcoming year. The down-side of this is quite a few potential borrowers may have trouble qualifying for these low rates. This is simply because it is much more difficult to meet the newer and more rigorous credit standards as a result of the housing crisis in general. This factor is also expected to be a major characteristic of the ‘trend’ in mortgage rates for the coming year as well. Based on this outlook, prospective home-buyers with less-than-optimum credit standings. extreme levels of debt obligations, or even unpredictable employment security should undoubtedly have difficulty acquiring a housing loan during 2012 due to much more meticulous lending constraints and oversight.

Current Mortgage Requirements

The requirements a potential borrower will need to be eligible for a mortgage in 2012 will be quite detailed. They will need to be very thorough in providing sufficient background material. They should also be prepared to meet the more rigorous requirements of having credit ratings at a minimum of 600 or higher, depending on the lending institution. In addition, there will be greater scrutiny with regard to documented proof of employment steadiness and security as well as verifiable income levels. Debt obligation levels are required to fall within certain percentages in relation to a home-buyer total income.

The Reality of the Current Mortgage Environment

As an ongoing after-effect of the housing crisis of 2008, there will be fewer mortgaging options for home-buyers in the coming year, leaving the more ‘exotic’ type of lending methods a thing of the past. One form of collateral damage caused by the crisis has been the ‘stated income’ loans, which permitted potential buyers to rely on undocumented income statements to acquire loan approval. Likewise, the identical treatment will be extended toward ‘no-doc’ mortgages, where the lender will request far more detailed information regarding employment, income, assets, and debt standings than was required in the recent past. Piggy-back mortgages have also gone the way of the chopping block in many states, which were utilized when a borrower combined two mortgage loans to avoid paying the private mortgage insurance (PMI) requirements on the loan.

The potential home buyer looking to secure a mortgage loan needs to possess a good bit of insight and instinct to understand not only the trends in the local mortgage market, but those that affect the national mortgage market as well. Each of these have a direct impact on the prevailing interest rates. Careful and diligent research via numerous online sites should provide adequate information regarding the current mortgage trends and lending practices in a borrower’s desired market. No amount of investigation or thoughtful planning is wasted in this all-important milestone for acquiring the best possible mortgage at the most favorable rates.


Patty Will – American Mortgage Service Company #2nd #mortgage #rates


#american mortgage

#

About Me

Patty has been in the mortgage business in the greater Lafayette area for the past 19 years. In addition to Conventional, VA, USDA, and FHA loans, she specializes in first-time-homebuyer loans, loans to customers with less than perfect credit and rehabilitation loans.

As a graduate of Purdue University, Patty attributes her success to her ability to personally connect with people from all walks of life. She has empathy to those who have had hard times-yet the ability to be straight forward about the reality of their situation; and most importantly, how to get them to where they want to be in the near or distant future.

Patty s level of commitment, professionalism, responsiveness, along with her attitude of excellence has earned her the respect and loyalty of many of the area s top real estate agents and builders. Patty, with the support of Sara Yost, her full time assistant, and Dana Thomas, an exceptional loan processor, is able to stand behind her commitments to her customers, builders and Realtors and deliver a hassle free, timely closing, as promised.

Patty is the mother of four boys. Three are grown and one teenager still at home. She and her husband, Scott, live in West Lafayette. She spends her free time watching Purdue sports, her youngest son play baseball, and gardening.

Do you have questions? Contact me. Apply Now