Cloud Computing Profile, News, Entries, Results, Video, and Blogs #cloud #computing #terms


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Cloud Computing

Jockey has won four straight Eclipse Awards.

So what do we make of the beginning of the second half of the 2017 race season, where in the space of one week we’ve seen the defeats of Arrogate, Always Dreaming, Cloud Computing, Irish War Cry, and Timeline with nary a battle offered?

Hindsight proves the racing community should have been ready for Good Samaritan to do exactly what he did in the $600,000 Jim Dandy Stakes (G2) at Saratoga Race Course July 29

From now through the first weekend in November is prime time for horseplayers, and it’s always especially compelling theater when absolutely nothing has been settled in the 3-year-old division.

J. Keeler Johnson handicaps the Jim Dandy Stakes (G2) and Vanderbilt Handicap (G1) at Saratoga.

In what will be their first starts since the second classic in Baltimore, Always Dreaming will try and make his last outing into an aberration, while Cloud Computing is out to reinforce his late-blooming upside.

Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (G1) winner Always Dreaming turned in a five-furlong breeze in 1:01.71 over the Oklahoma training track July 22 at Saratoga Race Course in preparation for the July 29 Jim Dandy Stakes (G2).

Always Dreaming, winner of the Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (G1), put in his first workout since finishing eighth in the May 20 Preakness Stakes (G1) and covered four furlongs in :49.96 over the Belmont Park training track July 1.

Chad Brown trainees and grade 1 winners Lady Eli, Cloud Computing, Practical Joke, and Antonoe all put in works at Belmont Park June 25.

Maclean’s Music is a powerful miler-type who closely resembles his sire physically and biomechanically.

Recently, horseman Mike Ryan’s dreams have come up classic: He co-bred May 6 Kentucky Derby Presented By Yum! Brands (G1) winner Always Dreaming and bought May 20 Preakness (G1) victor Cloud Computing as a yearling.

Only other year dominated by first-crop 3-year-olds since 1973

John Sikura’s instincts result in classic bloodlines

Steve Haskin reflects on Cloud Computing’s victory in the 2017 Preakness Stakes.

The sale grounds at Fasig-Tipton Midlantic were abuzz the morning of May 21 about the previous day’s racing at Pimlico Race Course highlighted by the Preakness Stakes (G1) victory of Seth Klarman and William Lawrence’s Cloud Computing.

With the glow of the sun pink on the horizon and most of the Pimlico Race Course stakes barn just beginning to rustle with activity, Preakness Stakes (G1) winner Cloud Computing departed from Baltimore to return to his Belmont Park home base May 21.

Claire Novak updates us on Cloud Computing, Classic Empire, Lookin At Lee, and more! Learn who is heading to the Belmont Stakes and when.

Cloud Computing with Javier Castellano wins the 142nd running of the Grade I Preakness Stakes at Pimlico on May 20, 2017.

Claire Novak recaps the Preakness Stakes won by Cloud Computing.

Attendance for the Preakness, won by Klaravich Stables and William Lawrence’s Cloud Computing, was 140,327, eclipsing last year’s record of 135,256.

Cloud Computing moved alongside Classic Empire in the final sixteenth of the Preakness Stakes (G1) and just got his head in front at the wire. Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (G1) winner Always Dreaming set the pace and finished eighth.

Since Always Dreaming’s Kentucky Derby triumph, there has been ample reason for both his camp and Classic Empire’s to feel emboldened about the prospect of their horses throwing down something exceptional 14 days later.

Bodemeister’s first starters at Pimlico this weekend

If you enjoyed the Kentucky Derby dream, no sense waking up now. You might as well keep dreaming until you are jolted back to reality, if and when that ever occurs.

Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (G1) winner Always Dreaming was assigned post 4 and installed as the 4-5 morning-line favorite May 17 at the post position draw for the May 20 Preakness Stakes (G1) at Pimlico Race Course.

Always Dreaming turned in another strong 1 1/2-mile gallop over the Pimlico Race Course main track May 17 as he readies for his start in the May 20 Preakness Stakes (G1).

Klaravich Stables and William Lawrence’s Cloud Computing tuned up for his expected run in the May 20 Preakness Stakes (G1) with a half-mile breeze in :48.85 over the Belmont Park training track May 13.

Cloud Computing, the third-place finisher in the April 8 Wood Memorial Stakes presented by NYRA Bets (G2), has been removed from contention for the Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (G1) and will point to the May 20 Preakness Stakes (G1).

Irish War Cry put doubts to rest April 8 in the $750,000 Wood Memorial Presented by NYRA Bets (G2), clearing Battalion Runner by open lengths to rebound from his lackluster performance last out.

After delivering dominating victories in his first two starts this season in graded stakes at Aqueduct Racetrack, El Areeb will return to the New York oval March 4 to try to continue that good form in the $300,000 Gotham Stakes (G3).

Connections


Adjustable Rate Mortgage Terms You Should Know #mortgage #broker #license


#5 year arm

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Adjustable Rate Mortgage Terms You Should Know – “ARM” Yourself with Knowledge

With interest rates on fixed-rate mortgages trending upward, adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) can be an attractive alternative. Several times over the last 30 years, consumers have turned to ARMs in market conditions that favored short-term rates over the traditional 30-year fixed.

However, while most consumers responsibly carry an ARM, there have been situations where the ARM did not make financial sense, and as a result, the loan earned a tarnished reputation. News of negative amortization loans and optional payment plans overshadowed the true function of the ARM which involves neither.

The truth is, many consumers have benefitted from ARMs and prefer to use them as a tool to save money in the short-term while planning for the long-term. Current market conditions are once again leaning in favor of adjustable rate mortgages and it’s important to understand their function. Here’s information about ARMs, how to interpret the “lingo” and how to decide if it’s right for you.

Adjustable Rate Mortgage Definition

An adjustable rate mortgage is a home loan with an interest rate that adjusts on a predetermined basis. Most ARMs begin with a fixed rate for a certain period of time and then adjust up or down according to the index on which it is based, after the fixed period expires. For example, if you have a 5/1 ARM, the interest rate is fixed for the first five years and then the rate adjusts once each year beginning in year 6.

ARMs typically offer a lower initial interest rate than a traditional 30-year fixed mortgage. After the fixed period, the interest rate can fluctuate based on market conditions but the loan agreement typically has a lifetime cap so the monthly payments cannot exceed a specific threshold. When interest rates increase, typically, loan payments also increase and the same is true when rates go down. However, each time the rate resets, it does so on the remaining years and the remaining balance of your loan, not the initial loan amount, which can help mitigate an extreme disparity between the previous payment and the new one.

Adjustable Rate Mortgages

To comprehend the functionality of ARMs, there are a few terms you should understand when talking to your mortgage banker to determine if this loan program is a good match for your financial situation:

Index: The economic indicator used to calculate interest-rate adjustments for ARMs. The index rate can increase or decrease at any time.

Initial Cap: This cap is the maximum amount the interest rate can adjust after the fixed-period. (The initial cap and the periodic cap may be the same or different i.e. 2/2/5 or 5/2/5)

Periodic Cap: This cap puts a limit on the interest-rate increase from one adjustment period to the next.

Lifetime Cap: This cap puts a limit on the interest-rate increase over the life of the loan. All adjustable-rate mortgages have an overall cap.

Adjustable Rate Mortgage Loans

You should also be able to recognize these terms in their numerical form, as this is the way in which your lender will illustrate the type of ARM you qualify for.

5/1: The five represents the amount of years the interest rate is fixed. The one indicates that the interest rate will adjust yearly after the fixed period.

2/2/5:(Note: Caps can be different depending on the term of the loan. For example, you may find that a 7-year ARM has a 5/2/5 cap structure). But for this example, the first two means that the most a rate can change is two percent the year after the fixed period expires. The second two means that the rate can change two percent every year thereafter, and the five means the maximum percentage that can be added to the initial rate for the lifetime of the loan.

For example, the maximum rate and payment you would experience for a $200,000 5/1 loan (2/2/5) at 3.99% would be:

It’s important to note that while interest rates can rise, they can also decrease, making your payments smaller. The example above reflects the most you would pay if rates increased to the maximum or lifetime cap. Knowing the maximum amount you could end up paying on your ARM is important, because it will help you decide if it’s best to refinance prior to the expiration of the fixed rate, or continue to allow the rate to adjust because it is still cost-effective. Even with the adjusted rates, the average rate on this loan is 5.365%, which is comparable or lower than a 30-year fixed rate. In addition, the ARM gives you the opportunity to save thousands of dollars the first five years of the loan (money you would have spent on the fixed-rate loan) and gives you greater equity in your home because you reduce your principal faster. Being the financially savvy client that you are, you realize that the savings could be used to pay down additional debt, add to your retirement fund or something more creative!

Ready to get started or curious about adjustable rate loan options? Contact a Home Loan Expert today !

Related Posts

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Star-Studded Benefits for Returning Quicken Loans Clients Quicken Loans is churning out exciting incentives for returning clients – everything from $1,000 off.

Who Wants an ARM? These Folks May Be Interested Adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) often get blamed for the U.S. housing bubble burst in 2008. But as.

Buying a Home from a Family Member: Non-Arm’s Length Transactions Buying a home is a tricky, complicated, expensive, draining and stressful process. Okay, not always.

Want to impress your friends and family with the knowledge we’ll drop on ya?
If so, subscribe now for tips on home, money, and life delivered straight to your inbox.


Adjustable Rate Mortgage Terms You Should Know #cheapest #mortgage #rates


#5 year arm

#

Adjustable Rate Mortgage Terms You Should Know – “ARM” Yourself with Knowledge

With interest rates on fixed-rate mortgages trending upward, adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) can be an attractive alternative. Several times over the last 30 years, consumers have turned to ARMs in market conditions that favored short-term rates over the traditional 30-year fixed.

However, while most consumers responsibly carry an ARM, there have been situations where the ARM did not make financial sense, and as a result, the loan earned a tarnished reputation. News of negative amortization loans and optional payment plans overshadowed the true function of the ARM which involves neither.

The truth is, many consumers have benefitted from ARMs and prefer to use them as a tool to save money in the short-term while planning for the long-term. Current market conditions are once again leaning in favor of adjustable rate mortgages and it’s important to understand their function. Here’s information about ARMs, how to interpret the “lingo” and how to decide if it’s right for you.

Adjustable Rate Mortgage Definition

An adjustable rate mortgage is a home loan with an interest rate that adjusts on a predetermined basis. Most ARMs begin with a fixed rate for a certain period of time and then adjust up or down according to the index on which it is based, after the fixed period expires. For example, if you have a 5/1 ARM, the interest rate is fixed for the first five years and then the rate adjusts once each year beginning in year 6.

ARMs typically offer a lower initial interest rate than a traditional 30-year fixed mortgage. After the fixed period, the interest rate can fluctuate based on market conditions but the loan agreement typically has a lifetime cap so the monthly payments cannot exceed a specific threshold. When interest rates increase, typically, loan payments also increase and the same is true when rates go down. However, each time the rate resets, it does so on the remaining years and the remaining balance of your loan, not the initial loan amount, which can help mitigate an extreme disparity between the previous payment and the new one.

Adjustable Rate Mortgages

To comprehend the functionality of ARMs, there are a few terms you should understand when talking to your mortgage banker to determine if this loan program is a good match for your financial situation:

Index: The economic indicator used to calculate interest-rate adjustments for ARMs. The index rate can increase or decrease at any time.

Initial Cap: This cap is the maximum amount the interest rate can adjust after the fixed-period. (The initial cap and the periodic cap may be the same or different i.e. 2/2/5 or 5/2/5)

Periodic Cap: This cap puts a limit on the interest-rate increase from one adjustment period to the next.

Lifetime Cap: This cap puts a limit on the interest-rate increase over the life of the loan. All adjustable-rate mortgages have an overall cap.

Adjustable Rate Mortgage Loans

You should also be able to recognize these terms in their numerical form, as this is the way in which your lender will illustrate the type of ARM you qualify for.

5/1: The five represents the amount of years the interest rate is fixed. The one indicates that the interest rate will adjust yearly after the fixed period.

2/2/5:(Note: Caps can be different depending on the term of the loan. For example, you may find that a 7-year ARM has a 5/2/5 cap structure). But for this example, the first two means that the most a rate can change is two percent the year after the fixed period expires. The second two means that the rate can change two percent every year thereafter, and the five means the maximum percentage that can be added to the initial rate for the lifetime of the loan.

For example, the maximum rate and payment you would experience for a $200,000 5/1 loan (2/2/5) at 3.99% would be:

It’s important to note that while interest rates can rise, they can also decrease, making your payments smaller. The example above reflects the most you would pay if rates increased to the maximum or lifetime cap. Knowing the maximum amount you could end up paying on your ARM is important, because it will help you decide if it’s best to refinance prior to the expiration of the fixed rate, or continue to allow the rate to adjust because it is still cost-effective. Even with the adjusted rates, the average rate on this loan is 5.365%, which is comparable or lower than a 30-year fixed rate. In addition, the ARM gives you the opportunity to save thousands of dollars the first five years of the loan (money you would have spent on the fixed-rate loan) and gives you greater equity in your home because you reduce your principal faster. Being the financially savvy client that you are, you realize that the savings could be used to pay down additional debt, add to your retirement fund or something more creative!

Ready to get started or curious about adjustable rate loan options? Contact a Home Loan Expert today !

Related Posts

Act Now While Rates Are Low If you’re ready to purchase a new house or refinance the one you’re in, you won’t find a better time.

Star-Studded Benefits for Returning Quicken Loans Clients Quicken Loans is churning out exciting incentives for returning clients – everything from $1,000 off.

Who Wants an ARM? These Folks May Be Interested Adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) often get blamed for the U.S. housing bubble burst in 2008. But as.

Buying a Home from a Family Member: Non-Arm’s Length Transactions Buying a home is a tricky, complicated, expensive, draining and stressful process. Okay, not always.

Want to impress your friends and family with the knowledge we’ll drop on ya?
If so, subscribe now for tips on home, money, and life delivered straight to your inbox.


Individual – Series I Savings Bonds Rates – Terms: Calculating Interest Rates #canada #mortgage #calculator


#historical interest rates

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RESEARCH CENTER

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Series I Savings Bonds Rates Terms: Calculating Interest Rates

What interest will I get if I buy an I bond now?

The composite rate for I bonds issued from May 1, 2016, through October 31, 2016, is 0.26%. This rate applies for the first six months you own the bond.

How do I bonds earn interest?

An I bond earns interest monthly from the first day of the month in the issue date. The interest accrues (is added to the bond) for up to 30 years.

  • The interest is compounded semiannually. Every six months from the bond’s issue date, all interest the bond has earned in previous months is in the bond’s new principal value. Interest is earned on the new principal for the next six months. For example, in month seven, interest is earned on the original price plus six months of interest. In month 13, interest is earned on the original price plus 12 months of interest. (However, values displayed by the Savings Bond Calculator for bonds that are less than five years old do not include the latest three months of interest. These values reflect the interest penalty.) If you hold the bond for at least five years, when you cash in (redeem) the bond, you receive all the interest the bond has earned plus the amount you paid for the bond.
  • You can redeem the bond after 12 months. However, if you redeem the bond before it is five years old, you lose the last three months of interest.

How does Treasury figure the I bond interest rate?

The interest on I bonds is a combination of

  • a fixed rate, and
  • an inflation rate

To see the current value of your bonds, use the Savings Bond Calculator. When using the Savings Bond Calculator to look up values of bonds that are less than 5 years old, keep in mind that the values of those bonds do not include the latest three months of interest. However, rates shown by the Savings Bond Calculator for those bonds do not reflect that interest penalty.

Fixed rate

You know the fixed rate of interest that you will get for your bond when you buy the bond. That fixed rate does not change during the life of the bond.

Treasury announces the fixed rate for I bonds every six months (on the first business day in May and on the first business day in November). That fixed rate then applies to all I bonds issued during the next six months.

The fixed rate is an annual rate. Compounding is semiannual .

Inflation rate

Unlike the fixed rate which does not change for the life of the bond, the inflation rate can and usually does change every six months.

We set the inflation rate every six months (on the first business day of May and on the first business day of November), based on changes in the non-seasonally adjusted Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers (CPI-U) for all items, including food and energy.

However, the change is applied to your bond every six months from the bond’s issue date. (The dates for these changes might not be May 1 and November 1.) When does my bond change rates?

Combining the two rates

To get the actual rate of interest (sometimes referred to as the composite or earnings rate) we combine the fixed rate and the inflation rate, using the equation in the example below.

  • The combined rate will never be less than zero. However, the combined rate can be lower than the fixed rate. If the inflation rate is negative (because we have deflation, not inflation), it can offset some of the fixed rate.
  • If the inflation rate is so negative that it would take away more than the fixed rate, we don’t let that happen. We stop at zero.

An example

The composite rate for I bonds issued from May 1, 2016, through October 31, 2016, is 0.26%

Here’s how we set that composite rate:

December 1 and June 1

Because I bonds that are less than five years old have values that do not include the latest three months of interest, values displayed by the Savings Bond Calculator for these bonds will not reflect rate changes on the schedule in the table above (When does my bond change rates? ) When looking at changes in values for these bonds, rate changes will seem to be delayed by three months.

What have rates been in the past?

Our Series I bond rate chart shows in one table all past and current rates–fixed rates, inflation rates, and composite rates.

The two tables below show fixed rates and inflation rates, respectively.

Fixed rates

The fixed rate set each May and November applies to all bonds we issue in the six months following the date when we set the rate. The fixed rate applies for the life of the bond.

Date the fixed rate was set

Fixed rate for bonds issued in the six months after that date


Used RV Parts And Accessories #rvs #campers #motorhomes #sales #and #rentals,preowned #and #repairable #autos,atv #utvs


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We take pride and pleasure in selling new and used RVs, Travel Trailers, Campers, Cars and Trucks, Motorcycles, RV Parts and Accessories. We also specialize in Rebuildable Insurance Salvage, Repairable Wrecks, Heavy Equipment and Repairable MotorHomes.

This company is owned and operated by Mr. Terry Blankenship. We have been involved in the automotive industry and in the business of buying, selling, repair and service for over 30 years in Kentucky. Our great success and countless happy customers is a direct result of our relentless effort to acquire quality items and make them available to the public at wholesale or below. Our goal is to always describe and disclose as much information to the best of our ability about all of the units we sell.

Visone Auto Mart & RV Parts
243 Fields Lane
East Bernstadt, Ky 40729

phone # 606-843-9889 Note – Because Of The Large Numbers Of Calls, If You Have Difficulty – Please Call try your call again later.

Office Hours of Operation:
8:30 – AM TIL – 6:00 – PM Monday thu Friday EST. Time.

Closed Saturday. Special appointment’s only.

Sales Manager – Terry Reece.
Title Clerk – Wayne Woodyard.
Buyer – Michael McKnight.
Shop Manager / Technician – Wes Rookard.
RV Service and Repair center.

Local driving directions to Visone Auto Mart .

** THANKS FOR LOOKING. KEEP US IN YOUR FAVORITES FOR FUTURE PURCHASES.**


Adjustable Rate Mortgage Terms You Should Know #monthly #payment #mortgage


#5 year arm

#

Adjustable Rate Mortgage Terms You Should Know – “ARM” Yourself with Knowledge

With interest rates on fixed-rate mortgages trending upward, adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) can be an attractive alternative. Several times over the last 30 years, consumers have turned to ARMs in market conditions that favored short-term rates over the traditional 30-year fixed.

However, while most consumers responsibly carry an ARM, there have been situations where the ARM did not make financial sense, and as a result, the loan earned a tarnished reputation. News of negative amortization loans and optional payment plans overshadowed the true function of the ARM which involves neither.

The truth is, many consumers have benefitted from ARMs and prefer to use them as a tool to save money in the short-term while planning for the long-term. Current market conditions are once again leaning in favor of adjustable rate mortgages and it’s important to understand their function. Here’s information about ARMs, how to interpret the “lingo” and how to decide if it’s right for you.

Adjustable Rate Mortgage Definition

An adjustable rate mortgage is a home loan with an interest rate that adjusts on a predetermined basis. Most ARMs begin with a fixed rate for a certain period of time and then adjust up or down according to the index on which it is based, after the fixed period expires. For example, if you have a 5/1 ARM, the interest rate is fixed for the first five years and then the rate adjusts once each year beginning in year 6.

ARMs typically offer a lower initial interest rate than a traditional 30-year fixed mortgage. After the fixed period, the interest rate can fluctuate based on market conditions but the loan agreement typically has a lifetime cap so the monthly payments cannot exceed a specific threshold. When interest rates increase, typically, loan payments also increase and the same is true when rates go down. However, each time the rate resets, it does so on the remaining years and the remaining balance of your loan, not the initial loan amount, which can help mitigate an extreme disparity between the previous payment and the new one.

Adjustable Rate Mortgages

To comprehend the functionality of ARMs, there are a few terms you should understand when talking to your mortgage banker to determine if this loan program is a good match for your financial situation:

Index: The economic indicator used to calculate interest-rate adjustments for ARMs. The index rate can increase or decrease at any time.

Initial Cap: This cap is the maximum amount the interest rate can adjust after the fixed-period. (The initial cap and the periodic cap may be the same or different i.e. 2/2/5 or 5/2/5)

Periodic Cap: This cap puts a limit on the interest-rate increase from one adjustment period to the next.

Lifetime Cap: This cap puts a limit on the interest-rate increase over the life of the loan. All adjustable-rate mortgages have an overall cap.

Adjustable Rate Mortgage Loans

You should also be able to recognize these terms in their numerical form, as this is the way in which your lender will illustrate the type of ARM you qualify for.

5/1: The five represents the amount of years the interest rate is fixed. The one indicates that the interest rate will adjust yearly after the fixed period.

2/2/5:(Note: Caps can be different depending on the term of the loan. For example, you may find that a 7-year ARM has a 5/2/5 cap structure). But for this example, the first two means that the most a rate can change is two percent the year after the fixed period expires. The second two means that the rate can change two percent every year thereafter, and the five means the maximum percentage that can be added to the initial rate for the lifetime of the loan.

For example, the maximum rate and payment you would experience for a $200,000 5/1 loan (2/2/5) at 3.99% would be:

It’s important to note that while interest rates can rise, they can also decrease, making your payments smaller. The example above reflects the most you would pay if rates increased to the maximum or lifetime cap. Knowing the maximum amount you could end up paying on your ARM is important, because it will help you decide if it’s best to refinance prior to the expiration of the fixed rate, or continue to allow the rate to adjust because it is still cost-effective. Even with the adjusted rates, the average rate on this loan is 5.365%, which is comparable or lower than a 30-year fixed rate. In addition, the ARM gives you the opportunity to save thousands of dollars the first five years of the loan (money you would have spent on the fixed-rate loan) and gives you greater equity in your home because you reduce your principal faster. Being the financially savvy client that you are, you realize that the savings could be used to pay down additional debt, add to your retirement fund or something more creative!

Ready to get started or curious about adjustable rate loan options? Contact a Home Loan Expert today !

Related Posts

Act Now While Rates Are Low If you’re ready to purchase a new house or refinance the one you’re in, you won’t find a better time.

Star-Studded Benefits for Returning Quicken Loans Clients Quicken Loans is churning out exciting incentives for returning clients – everything from $1,000 off.

Who Wants an ARM? These Folks May Be Interested Adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) often get blamed for the U.S. housing bubble burst in 2008. But as.

Buying a Home from a Family Member: Non-Arm’s Length Transactions Buying a home is a tricky, complicated, expensive, draining and stressful process. Okay, not always.

Want to impress your friends and family with the knowledge we’ll drop on ya?
If so, subscribe now for tips on home, money, and life delivered straight to your inbox.


Health Insurance Glossary – Health Insurance Definitions and Terms #health #insurance #glossary, #health #insurance #terms,


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Home Health Insurance Glossary

Health Insurance Glossary

24 Hour Approval: “24 Hour Approval” is a special feature offered on some health insurance plans. When you apply for coverage under plans offering “24 Hour Approval”, you can be advised via email of the insurance company’s coverage decision within 24 hours. How It Works:

  • 1) Apply online for a health insurance plan with this symbol.
  • 2) Complete and submit the application online through our website.
  • 3) The insurance company will then review your application and you can receive an update within 24 hours on whether you are approved; though in some cases you may receive a status update or request for further information instead. Depending on whether the insurance company needs more information, when you submit your application or other conditions, some exceptions may apply. Access: The availability of medical care. The quality of one’s access to medical care is determined by location, transportation options, and the type of medical care facilities available in the area, etc. Accident: For health insurance purposes, an accident is an unforeseen, unexpected and unintended event resulting in bodily injury. Accumulation Period: The period of time during which an insured person incurs eligible medical expenses toward the satisfaction of a deductible. Actively-at-work: Most group health insurance policies state that if an employee is not “actively-at-work” on the day the policy goes into effect, the coverage will not begin until the employee returns to work. Actual Charge: The actual dollar amount charged by a physician or other provider for medical services rendered, as distinguished from the allowable charge. Actuary: A person professionally trained in the mathematical and statistical aspects of the insurance industry.
    Actuaries frequently calculate premium rates, reserves and dividends and assist in estimating the costs and savings of benefit changes. Acupuncture: Typicablly, acupuncture services include services performed by a licensed acupuncturist. Acute Care: Medical care administered, frequently in a hospital or by nursing professionals, for the treatment of a serious injury or illness or during recovery from surgery. Medical conditions requiring acute care are typically periodic or temporary in nature, rather than chronic. Additional Drug Benefit List: see Drug Maintenance List. Administrative Services Only (ASO) Agreement: A business contract under which an insurance company agrees to perform specific administrative duties for the maintenance of a self-funded health insurance plan. Admissions/1,000: A statistic used by health insurance companies describing the number of hospital admissions for each 1000 persons covered under a health insurance plan within a given time period. Admits: Hospital admissions. A term used to describe the number of persons admitted to a hospital within a given period. Adverse Selection: The tendency of those who experience greater health risks to apply for and continue their coverage under any given health insurance plan. When adverse selection increases, health insurance companies experience greater expenses and may raise rates. Age Change: For insurance purposes, this is the date on which a person’s age changes. Note that this may not correspond with the individual’s actual birthday, but may fall midway between birthdays. An age change may result in an increase in rates. Age Limits: Ages below and above which an insurance company will not accept applications or renew policies. Age/Sex Factor: A factor employed by insurance companies in the underwriting process, used to determine a group’s risk of incurring medical costs, based on the ages and genders of the persons in that group. Agent: A state-licensed individual or entity representing one or more insurance companies. An agent solicits and facilitates the sale of insurance contracts or policies and provides services to the policyholder on behalf of the insurer. See also, Broker. Allied Health Personnel: Also referred to as paramedical personnel, these are health workers (often licensed) who perform duties that would otherwise be performed by physicians, optometrists, dentists, podiatrists, nurses and chiropractors. Allowable Charge: -also referred to as the Allowed Amount. Approved Charge or Maximum Allowable. See also, Usual, Customary and Reasonable Charge. This is the dollar amount typically considered payment-in-full by an insurance company and an associated network of healthcare providers. The Allowable Charge is typically a discounted rate rather than the actual charge. It may be helpful to consider an example: You have just visited your doctor for an earache. The total charge for the visit comes to $100. If the doctor is a member of your health insurance company’s network of providers, he or she may be required to accept $80 as payment in full for the visit – this is the Allowable Charge. Your health insurance company will pay all or a portion of the remaining $80, minus any co-payment or deductible that you may owe. The remaining $20 is considered provider write-off. You cannot be billed for this provider write-off. If, however, the doctor you visit is not a network provider then you may be held responsible for everything that your health insurance company will not pay, up to the full charge of $100.

This term may also be used within a Medicare context to refer to the amount that Medicare considers payment in full for a particular, approved medical service or supply. Allowable Costs: Charges for healthcare services and supplies for which benefits are available under your health insurance plan. Allowed Amount: -see Allowable Charge. Alternate Delivery System: Healthcare services or facilities which “deliver” care that is more cost-effective than that provided in a hospital. Alternate Delivery Systems may include skilled nursing facilities, hospice programs and home health care services. Alternative Medicine: Any medical practice of form of treatment not generally recognized as effective by the medical community at large. Alternative medicine may encompass a broad range of services and practices including acupuncture, homeopathy, aromatherapy, naturopathy, etc. Many insurance companies do not provide coverage for these services. Ambulatory Care: Medical care rendered on an outpatient basis and which may include diagnosis, certain forms of treatment, surgery and rehabilitation. See also, Ambulatory Setting. Ambulatory Setting: Medical facilities such as surgery centers, clinics and offices in which healthcare is provided on an outpatient basis. Ancillary Fee: An extra fee sometimes associated with obtaining prescription drugs which are not listed on a health insurance plan’s formulary of covered medications. Ancillary Products: Additional health insurance products (such as vision or dental insurance) that may be added to a medical insurance plan for an additional fee. Ancillary Services: Supplemental healthcare services such as laboratory work, x-rays or physical therapy that are provided in conjunction with medical or hospital care. Annual limit: Many health insurance plans place dollar limits upon the claims the insurer will pay over the course of a plan year. Beginning September 23, 2010, PPACA phases annual dollar limits will be phased out over the next 3 years until 2014 when they will not be permitted for most plans. There is an exception to this phase out for Grandfathered Plans. Except for Grandfathered Plans, beginning September 23, 2012 annual limits can be no lower than $2 million. Except for Grandfathered Plans, beginning January 1, 2014, all annual dollar limits on coverage of essential health benefits will be prohibited. Application Fee: The health insurance company may require a one-time application fee. Some insurance companies may refund this fee if the application is not approved. See More Insurance Plan Details section for additional information. Approved Charge: -see Allowable Charge. Approved Health Care Facility or Program: A medical facility or healthcare program (often organized through a hospital or clinic) that has been approved by a health insurance plan to provide specific services for specific conditions. Assignment of Benefits: The payment of health insurance benefits to a healthcare provider rather than directly to the member of a health insurance plan. Attending Physician Statement (APS): A physician’s assessment of a patient’s state of health as outlined in office notes and test results compiled by the physician. An APS may be requested by an insurance company in lieu of a medical examination in order to determine the state of a health insurance applicant’s health for underwriting purposes.

please note, however, that definitions of certain terms may vary across insurance companies.

eHealthInsurance is the nation’s leading online source of health insurance. eHealthInsurance offers thousands of health plans underwritten by more than 180 of the nation’s health insurance companies, including Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield. Compare plans side by side, get health insurance quotes. apply online and find affordable health insurance today.

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Individual – Series I Savings Bonds Rates – Terms: Calculating Interest Rates #loan #calculator #amortization


#historical interest rates

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RESEARCH CENTER

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Series I Savings Bonds Rates Terms: Calculating Interest Rates

What interest will I get if I buy an I bond now?

The composite rate for I bonds issued from May 1, 2016, through October 31, 2016, is 0.26%. This rate applies for the first six months you own the bond.

How do I bonds earn interest?

An I bond earns interest monthly from the first day of the month in the issue date. The interest accrues (is added to the bond) for up to 30 years.

  • The interest is compounded semiannually. Every six months from the bond’s issue date, all interest the bond has earned in previous months is in the bond’s new principal value. Interest is earned on the new principal for the next six months. For example, in month seven, interest is earned on the original price plus six months of interest. In month 13, interest is earned on the original price plus 12 months of interest. (However, values displayed by the Savings Bond Calculator for bonds that are less than five years old do not include the latest three months of interest. These values reflect the interest penalty.) If you hold the bond for at least five years, when you cash in (redeem) the bond, you receive all the interest the bond has earned plus the amount you paid for the bond.
  • You can redeem the bond after 12 months. However, if you redeem the bond before it is five years old, you lose the last three months of interest.

How does Treasury figure the I bond interest rate?

The interest on I bonds is a combination of

  • a fixed rate, and
  • an inflation rate

To see the current value of your bonds, use the Savings Bond Calculator. When using the Savings Bond Calculator to look up values of bonds that are less than 5 years old, keep in mind that the values of those bonds do not include the latest three months of interest. However, rates shown by the Savings Bond Calculator for those bonds do not reflect that interest penalty.

Fixed rate

You know the fixed rate of interest that you will get for your bond when you buy the bond. That fixed rate does not change during the life of the bond.

Treasury announces the fixed rate for I bonds every six months (on the first business day in May and on the first business day in November). That fixed rate then applies to all I bonds issued during the next six months.

The fixed rate is an annual rate. Compounding is semiannual .

Inflation rate

Unlike the fixed rate which does not change for the life of the bond, the inflation rate can and usually does change every six months.

We set the inflation rate every six months (on the first business day of May and on the first business day of November), based on changes in the non-seasonally adjusted Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers (CPI-U) for all items, including food and energy.

However, the change is applied to your bond every six months from the bond’s issue date. (The dates for these changes might not be May 1 and November 1.) When does my bond change rates?

Combining the two rates

To get the actual rate of interest (sometimes referred to as the composite or earnings rate) we combine the fixed rate and the inflation rate, using the equation in the example below.

  • The combined rate will never be less than zero. However, the combined rate can be lower than the fixed rate. If the inflation rate is negative (because we have deflation, not inflation), it can offset some of the fixed rate.
  • If the inflation rate is so negative that it would take away more than the fixed rate, we don’t let that happen. We stop at zero.

An example

The composite rate for I bonds issued from May 1, 2016, through October 31, 2016, is 0.26%

Here’s how we set that composite rate:

December 1 and June 1

Because I bonds that are less than five years old have values that do not include the latest three months of interest, values displayed by the Savings Bond Calculator for these bonds will not reflect rate changes on the schedule in the table above (When does my bond change rates? ) When looking at changes in values for these bonds, rate changes will seem to be delayed by three months.

What have rates been in the past?

Our Series I bond rate chart shows in one table all past and current rates–fixed rates, inflation rates, and composite rates.

The two tables below show fixed rates and inflation rates, respectively.

Fixed rates

The fixed rate set each May and November applies to all bonds we issue in the six months following the date when we set the rate. The fixed rate applies for the life of the bond.

Date the fixed rate was set

Fixed rate for bonds issued in the six months after that date


Comparing mortgage terms (i #mortgage #calculaor


#20 year mortgage

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Comparing mortgage terms (i.e. 15, 20, 30 year)

Different mortgage terms and rates can make the loan selection process confusing, especially if you don’t plan on keeping the loan for the full term. Use this calculator to determine the total cost in today’s dollars of various mortgage alternatives taking into account your opportunity cost of money.

This information may help you analyze your financial needs. It is based on information and assumptions provided by you regarding your goals, expectations and financial situation. The calculations do not infer that the company assumes any fiduciary duties. The calculations provided should not be construed as financial, legal or tax advice. In addition, such information should not be relied upon as the only source of information. This information is supplied from sources we believe to be reliable but we cannot guarantee its accuracy. Hypothetical illustrations may provide historical or current performance information. Past performance does not guarantee nor indicate future results.


Individual – Series I Savings Bonds Rates – Terms: Calculating Interest Rates #historical #mortgage #rates


#historical interest rates

#

RESEARCH CENTER

We’re pleased to hear from our customers regarding their satisfaction with our website. Although your browser settings don’t allow you to view the website survey we’re conducting, please e-mail your comments.

Series I Savings Bonds Rates Terms: Calculating Interest Rates

What interest will I get if I buy an I bond now?

The composite rate for I bonds issued from May 1, 2016, through October 31, 2016, is 0.26%. This rate applies for the first six months you own the bond.

How do I bonds earn interest?

An I bond earns interest monthly from the first day of the month in the issue date. The interest accrues (is added to the bond) for up to 30 years.

  • The interest is compounded semiannually. Every six months from the bond’s issue date, all interest the bond has earned in previous months is in the bond’s new principal value. Interest is earned on the new principal for the next six months. For example, in month seven, interest is earned on the original price plus six months of interest. In month 13, interest is earned on the original price plus 12 months of interest. (However, values displayed by the Savings Bond Calculator for bonds that are less than five years old do not include the latest three months of interest. These values reflect the interest penalty.) If you hold the bond for at least five years, when you cash in (redeem) the bond, you receive all the interest the bond has earned plus the amount you paid for the bond.
  • You can redeem the bond after 12 months. However, if you redeem the bond before it is five years old, you lose the last three months of interest.

How does Treasury figure the I bond interest rate?

The interest on I bonds is a combination of

  • a fixed rate, and
  • an inflation rate

To see the current value of your bonds, use the Savings Bond Calculator. When using the Savings Bond Calculator to look up values of bonds that are less than 5 years old, keep in mind that the values of those bonds do not include the latest three months of interest. However, rates shown by the Savings Bond Calculator for those bonds do not reflect that interest penalty.

Fixed rate

You know the fixed rate of interest that you will get for your bond when you buy the bond. That fixed rate does not change during the life of the bond.

Treasury announces the fixed rate for I bonds every six months (on the first business day in May and on the first business day in November). That fixed rate then applies to all I bonds issued during the next six months.

The fixed rate is an annual rate. Compounding is semiannual .

Inflation rate

Unlike the fixed rate which does not change for the life of the bond, the inflation rate can and usually does change every six months.

We set the inflation rate every six months (on the first business day of May and on the first business day of November), based on changes in the non-seasonally adjusted Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers (CPI-U) for all items, including food and energy.

However, the change is applied to your bond every six months from the bond’s issue date. (The dates for these changes might not be May 1 and November 1.) When does my bond change rates?

Combining the two rates

To get the actual rate of interest (sometimes referred to as the composite or earnings rate) we combine the fixed rate and the inflation rate, using the equation in the example below.

  • The combined rate will never be less than zero. However, the combined rate can be lower than the fixed rate. If the inflation rate is negative (because we have deflation, not inflation), it can offset some of the fixed rate.
  • If the inflation rate is so negative that it would take away more than the fixed rate, we don’t let that happen. We stop at zero.

An example

The composite rate for I bonds issued from May 1, 2016, through October 31, 2016, is 0.26%

Here’s how we set that composite rate:

December 1 and June 1

Because I bonds that are less than five years old have values that do not include the latest three months of interest, values displayed by the Savings Bond Calculator for these bonds will not reflect rate changes on the schedule in the table above (When does my bond change rates? ) When looking at changes in values for these bonds, rate changes will seem to be delayed by three months.

What have rates been in the past?

Our Series I bond rate chart shows in one table all past and current rates–fixed rates, inflation rates, and composite rates.

The two tables below show fixed rates and inflation rates, respectively.

Fixed rates

The fixed rate set each May and November applies to all bonds we issue in the six months following the date when we set the rate. The fixed rate applies for the life of the bond.

Date the fixed rate was set

Fixed rate for bonds issued in the six months after that date