Walnut Grove Plantation – Roebuck, Spartanburg County, South Carolina SC #spartanburg #county #foundation, #walnut #grove


#

Walnut Grove Plantation Roebuck Spartanburg County

Basic Information

  • Location Tyger River, Roebuck, Ninety-Six District, Spartanburg County

Located off SC 215 at 1200 Otts Shoals Road

  • Origin of name Named for the walnut trees planted on the property by Kate Moore Barry


    Walnut Grove Plantation Chimney Lauren Fertig, 2010
    (Do Not Use Without Written Consent)

    Timeline

    • 1763 Earliest known date of existence

    Charles Moore received a grant for 550 acres along the Tyger River by King George III. He later received additional grants bringing his total acreage to about 3,000 (1 ).

  • 1765 Charles Moore built a house on the property.

    Charles and his wife Mary raised their ten children on the plantation.

  • 1767 Margaret Kathryn Moore (Kate). the first child of Charles and Mary Moore, married General Andrew Barry at the age of 15. During the Revolutionary War Kate helped her husband by spying on Tory troops, chasing them away from her home, and gathering men to help her husband fight. She was considered quite a heroine.

  • 1770 Charles Moore built a school building and operated the first school in Spartanburg County. Rocky Spring Academy was open until 1850.

  • 1961 The house, along with eight acres, was given to the Spartanburg County Foundation in a special trust with the Spartanburg County Historical Association as the sponsor for the trust. Up to this time, descendants of Charles and Mary Moore had owned the house and property (1 ).


    Walnut Grove Plantation House Outbuildings Lauren Fertig, 2010
    (Do Not Use Without Written Consent)

    Land

    • Number of acres 550 in 1763; 3,000; 8 in 1961

    Slaves


    Walnut Grove Plantation Kitchen Building Lauren Fertig, 2010
    (Do Not Use Without Written Consent)

    Buildings

    • Many of the outbuildings used in the 18th century still remain. These include kitchen, blacksmith shop, wheat house, barn, meat house (built in 1765), wellhouse with dry cellar, school, and doctor’s quarters.

    References Resources

  • Carolina W. Todd and Sidney Wait, South Carolina: A Day at a Time (Orangeburg, SC: Sandlapper Publishing Company, 2008)

  • Jane Ockershausen, The South Carolina One-Day Trip Book (McLean, VA: EPM Publications, 1998)

  • Information contributed by Victoria Edwards, a Moore family descendent.

    Contact Information

    • Walnut Grove Plantation
      1200 Otts Shoals Road
      Roebuck, SC 29376


    Cemetery at Walnut Grove Plantation Lauren Fertig, 2010
    (Do Not Use Without Written Consent)


    Well at Walnut Grove Plantation Lauren Fertig, 2010
    (Do Not Use Without Written Consent)


  • Employment status #remortgage


    #self employed mortgage

    #

    Employment status

    5. Self-employed and contractor

    A person is self-employed if they run their business for themselves and take responsibility for its success or failure.

    Self-employed workers aren’t paid through PAYE, and they don’t have the employment rights and responsibilities of employees .

    Someone can be both employed and self-employed at the same time, eg if they work for an employer during the day and run their own business in the evenings.

    Employment rights

    Employment law doesn’t cover self-employed people in most cases because they are their own boss.

    However, if a person is self-employed:

    • they still have protection for their health and safety and, in some cases, protection against discrimination
    • their rights and responsibilities are set out by the terms of the contract they have with their client

    Working out if someone is self-employed

    HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC ) may regard someone as self-employed for tax purposes even if they have a different status in employment law.

    Employers should check if a worker is self-employed in:

    • tax law – whether they’re exempt from PAYE
    • employment law – whether they have an employee’s rights

    Individuals and their employers may have to pay unpaid tax and penalties, or lose entitlement to benefits, if their employment status is wrong.

    Checking if they’re exempt from PAYE

    Someone is probably self-employed and shouldn’t be paid through PAYE if most of the following are true:

    • they’re in business for themselves, are responsible for the success or failure of their business and can make a loss or a profit
    • they can decide what work they do and when, where or how to do it
    • they can hire someone else to do the work
    • they’re responsible for fixing any unsatisfactory work in their own time
    • their employer agrees a fixed price for their work – it doesn’t depend on how long the job takes to finish
    • they use their own money to buy business assets, cover running costs, and provide tools and equipment for their work
    • they can work for more than one client

    If someone’s employment status for PAYE still isn’t clear, you can use HMRC ’s Employment Status Indicator or call HMRC .

    Checking their employment rights

    Someone is probably self-employed and doesn’t have the rights of an employee if they’re exempt from PAYE and most of the following are also true:

    • they put in bids or give quotes to get work
    • they’re not under direct supervision when working
    • they submit invoices for the work they’ve done
    • they’re responsible for paying their own National Insurance and tax
    • they don’t get holiday or sick pay when they’re not working
    • they operate under a contract (sometimes known as a ‘contract for services’ or ‘consultancy agreement’) that uses terms like ‘self-employed’, ‘consultant’ or an ‘independent contractor’

    Contractors

    A contractor can be:

    • self-employed
    • a worker or an employee if they work for a client and are employed by an agency

    There’s a special scheme for self-employed contractors and sub-contractors working in the construction industry called the Construction Industry Scheme (CIS ).

    If someone becomes self-employed

    A worker must tell HMRC if they become self-employed.


    Higher Education Loans Board #student #loans, #needy #students, #financing #higher #education, #schorlarship/bursary, #loan #application, #loan


    #

    May 10, 2017Submission of 2017/2018 undergraduate second and subsequent LAFs We wish to advise that you do not n. ++ May 2, 20172017/2018 Second Subsequent Undergraduate Loans We have opened 2017/2018 Second DG TVETA, Dr. Kipkurui Langat; HELB Chairman, Ndegwa Wachira;
    NTV News Anchor & Panel Moderator, Laban Cliff Onserio; KATTI Chairman, Jeff Kariuki; CEO KUCCPS, John Muraguri;
    DG Vision

  • Seated from Left, Daystar University Vice Chancellor, Prof. Timothy Wachira, HELB CEO/Board Secretary, Mr. Charles Ringera,
    HELB Board member, Mr. Habil Olaka. Standing from Left are HELB Board members, Mrs. Grace Kemei and Prof. David Some.

  • HELB staff pose for a group photo at the Thika School for the Visually Impaired after visiting the visually impaired students.

  • Left to right, Michael Kungu (KCB Head of Personal Banking), Parul Khimasia (APA Chief Business Development Officer),
    Charles Ringera (HELB CEO) and Rishi Radhpura (Maisha Edu)

  • A group photo of the representatives the agencies that fall under the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology,
    Headed by the Cabinet Secretary Dr. Fred Matiang’i (third-left, front row)during the First Biennial Conference on
    the State of Higher Education in Kenya

  • HELB CEO Charles Ringera cutting a cake with students at HELB’s Students Service Centre, Mezzanine 1 at the Anniversary
    Towers, during the 2016 Customer Service Week


  • Income Tax Filing Requirements #tax, #taxes, #turbotax, #irs, #filing #status, #irs #filing #requirements, #income #requirements,


    #

    Income Tax Filing Requirements

    With the second half of tax season here, it s time to get those gears in motion to start filing. Tax season means getting your paperwork and finances in order. While it may not seem exciting, filing taxes is manageable. Plus you may have a tax refund waiting. An overall understanding of the filing process is a great place to start.

    IRS Filing Requirements

    If you re a U.S. citizen or resident alien and you meet filing requirements, you are required to file an income tax return.

    According to the IRS, you must check these income requirements to determine if you required to file:

    • Gross Income: All your income including wages, tips, capital gains, tips, gambling winnings, and more should be claimed on your taxes if in 2016 it is at least:
      • Single: $10,350
      • Married (filing separately): $4,050
      • Married (filing jointly): $20,700
      • Head of Household: $ 13,350
      • Qualifying widow(er): $ 16,650
    • Filing Status: The five filing statuses are single, married (filing separately), married (filing jointly). head of household, and qualifying widow(er) with dependent child. Your filing status has a bearing on the deductions and exemptions you can take.
    • Age: If you re 65 or older, you can have a higher gross income before you re required to file taxes.
      • Single: $11,900
      • Married (filing jointly) one spouse 65 older: $21,950
      • Married (filing jointly) both spouses 65 older: $23,200
      • Head of Household: $14,900
      • Qualifying widow(er): $17,900

    What exactly is your adjusted gross income?

    Your adjusted gross income is basically your entire gross income minus any allowable tax deductions called above the line deductions. Some of them include:

    • Health Savings Account
    • Moving Expenses
    • Self-employed Health Insurance
    • Alimony Paid
    • Student Loan Interest
    • Tuition and Fees

    Your adjusted gross income is not the same as your taxable income.

    What s the difference between your adjusted gross income and taxable income?

    After your adjusted gross income has been calculated, you are then allowed to either take a standard deduction or itemized deductions. The standard deduction ($6,300 single, $12,600 married filing jointly) or itemized deductions, whichever one you are eligible for and gives you the lowest tax liability is subtracted from your adjusted gross income.

    Final Thoughts

    Even if your income is below the income filing requirements you should still file your taxes if you had federal taxes taken out since you may see your withholding come back in the form of a tax refund especially if you are eligible for a refundable tax credit like the Earned Income Tax Credit. Every year the IRS reports close to $1 billion in unclaimed refunds and the average unclaimed refund is about $700. Also, if you purchased health insurance in the Health Insurance Marketplace, you need to file to report your health insurance status.

    Don t worry about knowing these tax laws and how to make these calculations. TurboTax will ask you simple questions and calculate your taxable income and give you the tax deductions and credits you are eligible for based on your answers.

    How are you preparing this tax season?

    Post navigation


    Employment status #loan #calculator #home


    #self employed mortgage

    #

    Employment status

    5. Self-employed and contractor

    A person is self-employed if they run their business for themselves and take responsibility for its success or failure.

    Self-employed workers aren’t paid through PAYE, and they don’t have the employment rights and responsibilities of employees .

    Someone can be both employed and self-employed at the same time, eg if they work for an employer during the day and run their own business in the evenings.

    Employment rights

    Employment law doesn’t cover self-employed people in most cases because they are their own boss.

    However, if a person is self-employed:

    • they still have protection for their health and safety and, in some cases, protection against discrimination
    • their rights and responsibilities are set out by the terms of the contract they have with their client

    Working out if someone is self-employed

    HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC ) may regard someone as self-employed for tax purposes even if they have a different status in employment law.

    Employers should check if a worker is self-employed in:

    • tax law – whether they’re exempt from PAYE
    • employment law – whether they have an employee’s rights

    Individuals and their employers may have to pay unpaid tax and penalties, or lose entitlement to benefits, if their employment status is wrong.

    Checking if they’re exempt from PAYE

    Someone is probably self-employed and shouldn’t be paid through PAYE if most of the following are true:

    • they’re in business for themselves, are responsible for the success or failure of their business and can make a loss or a profit
    • they can decide what work they do and when, where or how to do it
    • they can hire someone else to do the work
    • they’re responsible for fixing any unsatisfactory work in their own time
    • their employer agrees a fixed price for their work – it doesn’t depend on how long the job takes to finish
    • they use their own money to buy business assets, cover running costs, and provide tools and equipment for their work
    • they can work for more than one client

    If someone’s employment status for PAYE still isn’t clear, you can use HMRC ’s Employment Status Indicator or call HMRC .

    Checking their employment rights

    Someone is probably self-employed and doesn’t have the rights of an employee if they’re exempt from PAYE and most of the following are also true:

    • they put in bids or give quotes to get work
    • they’re not under direct supervision when working
    • they submit invoices for the work they’ve done
    • they’re responsible for paying their own National Insurance and tax
    • they don’t get holiday or sick pay when they’re not working
    • they operate under a contract (sometimes known as a ‘contract for services’ or ‘consultancy agreement’) that uses terms like ‘self-employed’, ‘consultant’ or an ‘independent contractor’

    Contractors

    A contractor can be:

    • self-employed
    • a worker or an employee if they work for a client and are employed by an agency

    There’s a special scheme for self-employed contractors and sub-contractors working in the construction industry called the Construction Industry Scheme (CIS ).

    If someone becomes self-employed

    A worker must tell HMRC if they become self-employed.


    Adult Obesity Facts #obesity #affects, #socioeconomic #status, #obesity, #obese, #overweight, #weight, #childhood, #children, #child, #fat,


    #

    Adult Obesity Facts

    Obesity Prevalence Maps
    Adult obesity prevalence by state and territory using self-reported information from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

    Obesity is common, serious and costly

    • More than one-third (36.5%) of U.S. adults have obesity. [Read CDC National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) data brief PDF-704KB]
    • Obesity-related conditions include heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, some of the leading causes of preventable death. [Read guidelines ]
    • The estimated annual medical cost of obesity in the U.S. was $147 billion in 2008 U.S. dollars; the medical costs for people who are obese were $1,429 higher than those of normal weight. [Read summary ]

    Obesity affects some groups more than others

    [Read abstract Journal of American Medicine (JAMA) ]

    • Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest age-adjusted rates of obesity (48.1%) followed by Hispanics (42.5%), non-Hispanic whites (34.5%), and non-Hispanic Asians (11.7%). Obesity is higher among middle age adults age 40-59 years (40.2%) and older adults age 60 and over (37.0%) than among younger adults age 20–39 (32.3%).

    Obesity and socioeconomic status

    • Among non-Hispanic black and Mexican-American men, those with higher incomes are more likely to have obesity than those with low income.
    • Higher income women are less likely to have obesity than low-income women.
    • There is no significant relationship between obesity and education among men. Among women, however, there is a trend—those with college degrees are less likely to have obesity compared with less educated women.

    Related Links

    • Obesity Prevalence Maps
      State-specific data on adult obesity prevalence using self-reported information from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) shows that obesity prevalence remains high in the United States.

    Employment status #bankrate #loan #calc


    #self employed mortgage

    #

    Employment status

    5. Self-employed and contractor

    A person is self-employed if they run their business for themselves and take responsibility for its success or failure.

    Self-employed workers aren’t paid through PAYE, and they don’t have the employment rights and responsibilities of employees .

    Someone can be both employed and self-employed at the same time, eg if they work for an employer during the day and run their own business in the evenings.

    Employment rights

    Employment law doesn’t cover self-employed people in most cases because they are their own boss.

    However, if a person is self-employed:

    • they still have protection for their health and safety and, in some cases, protection against discrimination
    • their rights and responsibilities are set out by the terms of the contract they have with their client

    Working out if someone is self-employed

    HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC ) may regard someone as self-employed for tax purposes even if they have a different status in employment law.

    Employers should check if a worker is self-employed in:

    • tax law – whether they’re exempt from PAYE
    • employment law – whether they have an employee’s rights

    Individuals and their employers may have to pay unpaid tax and penalties, or lose entitlement to benefits, if their employment status is wrong.

    Checking if they’re exempt from PAYE

    Someone is probably self-employed and shouldn’t be paid through PAYE if most of the following are true:

    • they’re in business for themselves, are responsible for the success or failure of their business and can make a loss or a profit
    • they can decide what work they do and when, where or how to do it
    • they can hire someone else to do the work
    • they’re responsible for fixing any unsatisfactory work in their own time
    • their employer agrees a fixed price for their work – it doesn’t depend on how long the job takes to finish
    • they use their own money to buy business assets, cover running costs, and provide tools and equipment for their work
    • they can work for more than one client

    If someone’s employment status for PAYE still isn’t clear, you can use HMRC ’s Employment Status Indicator or call HMRC .

    Checking their employment rights

    Someone is probably self-employed and doesn’t have the rights of an employee if they’re exempt from PAYE and most of the following are also true:

    • they put in bids or give quotes to get work
    • they’re not under direct supervision when working
    • they submit invoices for the work they’ve done
    • they’re responsible for paying their own National Insurance and tax
    • they don’t get holiday or sick pay when they’re not working
    • they operate under a contract (sometimes known as a ‘contract for services’ or ‘consultancy agreement’) that uses terms like ‘self-employed’, ‘consultant’ or an ‘independent contractor’

    Contractors

    A contractor can be:

    • self-employed
    • a worker or an employee if they work for a client and are employed by an agency

    There’s a special scheme for self-employed contractors and sub-contractors working in the construction industry called the Construction Industry Scheme (CIS ).

    If someone becomes self-employed

    A worker must tell HMRC if they become self-employed.


    Employment status #mortgage #rate #comparison


    #self employed mortgage

    #

    Employment status

    5. Self-employed and contractor

    A person is self-employed if they run their business for themselves and take responsibility for its success or failure.

    Self-employed workers aren’t paid through PAYE, and they don’t have the employment rights and responsibilities of employees .

    Someone can be both employed and self-employed at the same time, eg if they work for an employer during the day and run their own business in the evenings.

    Employment rights

    Employment law doesn’t cover self-employed people in most cases because they are their own boss.

    However, if a person is self-employed:

    • they still have protection for their health and safety and, in some cases, protection against discrimination
    • their rights and responsibilities are set out by the terms of the contract they have with their client

    Working out if someone is self-employed

    HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC ) may regard someone as self-employed for tax purposes even if they have a different status in employment law.

    Employers should check if a worker is self-employed in:

    • tax law – whether they’re exempt from PAYE
    • employment law – whether they have an employee’s rights

    Individuals and their employers may have to pay unpaid tax and penalties, or lose entitlement to benefits, if their employment status is wrong.

    Checking if they’re exempt from PAYE

    Someone is probably self-employed and shouldn’t be paid through PAYE if most of the following are true:

    • they’re in business for themselves, are responsible for the success or failure of their business and can make a loss or a profit
    • they can decide what work they do and when, where or how to do it
    • they can hire someone else to do the work
    • they’re responsible for fixing any unsatisfactory work in their own time
    • their employer agrees a fixed price for their work – it doesn’t depend on how long the job takes to finish
    • they use their own money to buy business assets, cover running costs, and provide tools and equipment for their work
    • they can work for more than one client

    If someone’s employment status for PAYE still isn’t clear, you can use HMRC ’s Employment Status Indicator or call HMRC .

    Checking their employment rights

    Someone is probably self-employed and doesn’t have the rights of an employee if they’re exempt from PAYE and most of the following are also true:

    • they put in bids or give quotes to get work
    • they’re not under direct supervision when working
    • they submit invoices for the work they’ve done
    • they’re responsible for paying their own National Insurance and tax
    • they don’t get holiday or sick pay when they’re not working
    • they operate under a contract (sometimes known as a ‘contract for services’ or ‘consultancy agreement’) that uses terms like ‘self-employed’, ‘consultant’ or an ‘independent contractor’

    Contractors

    A contractor can be:

    • self-employed
    • a worker or an employee if they work for a client and are employed by an agency

    There’s a special scheme for self-employed contractors and sub-contractors working in the construction industry called the Construction Industry Scheme (CIS ).

    If someone becomes self-employed

    A worker must tell HMRC if they become self-employed.


    Employment status #current #mortgage #rate


    #self employed mortgage

    #

    Employment status

    5. Self-employed and contractor

    A person is self-employed if they run their business for themselves and take responsibility for its success or failure.

    Self-employed workers aren’t paid through PAYE, and they don’t have the employment rights and responsibilities of employees .

    Someone can be both employed and self-employed at the same time, eg if they work for an employer during the day and run their own business in the evenings.

    Employment rights

    Employment law doesn’t cover self-employed people in most cases because they are their own boss.

    However, if a person is self-employed:

    • they still have protection for their health and safety and, in some cases, protection against discrimination
    • their rights and responsibilities are set out by the terms of the contract they have with their client

    Working out if someone is self-employed

    HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC ) may regard someone as self-employed for tax purposes even if they have a different status in employment law.

    Employers should check if a worker is self-employed in:

    • tax law – whether they’re exempt from PAYE
    • employment law – whether they have an employee’s rights

    Individuals and their employers may have to pay unpaid tax and penalties, or lose entitlement to benefits, if their employment status is wrong.

    Checking if they’re exempt from PAYE

    Someone is probably self-employed and shouldn’t be paid through PAYE if most of the following are true:

    • they’re in business for themselves, are responsible for the success or failure of their business and can make a loss or a profit
    • they can decide what work they do and when, where or how to do it
    • they can hire someone else to do the work
    • they’re responsible for fixing any unsatisfactory work in their own time
    • their employer agrees a fixed price for their work – it doesn’t depend on how long the job takes to finish
    • they use their own money to buy business assets, cover running costs, and provide tools and equipment for their work
    • they can work for more than one client

    If someone’s employment status for PAYE still isn’t clear, you can use HMRC ’s Employment Status Indicator or call HMRC .

    Checking their employment rights

    Someone is probably self-employed and doesn’t have the rights of an employee if they’re exempt from PAYE and most of the following are also true:

    • they put in bids or give quotes to get work
    • they’re not under direct supervision when working
    • they submit invoices for the work they’ve done
    • they’re responsible for paying their own National Insurance and tax
    • they don’t get holiday or sick pay when they’re not working
    • they operate under a contract (sometimes known as a ‘contract for services’ or ‘consultancy agreement’) that uses terms like ‘self-employed’, ‘consultant’ or an ‘independent contractor’

    Contractors

    A contractor can be:

    • self-employed
    • a worker or an employee if they work for a client and are employed by an agency

    There’s a special scheme for self-employed contractors and sub-contractors working in the construction industry called the Construction Industry Scheme (CIS ).

    If someone becomes self-employed

    A worker must tell HMRC if they become self-employed.


    Employment status #home #calculator


    #self employed mortgage

    #

    Employment status

    5. Self-employed and contractor

    A person is self-employed if they run their business for themselves and take responsibility for its success or failure.

    Self-employed workers aren’t paid through PAYE, and they don’t have the employment rights and responsibilities of employees .

    Someone can be both employed and self-employed at the same time, eg if they work for an employer during the day and run their own business in the evenings.

    Employment rights

    Employment law doesn’t cover self-employed people in most cases because they are their own boss.

    However, if a person is self-employed:

    • they still have protection for their health and safety and, in some cases, protection against discrimination
    • their rights and responsibilities are set out by the terms of the contract they have with their client

    Working out if someone is self-employed

    HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC ) may regard someone as self-employed for tax purposes even if they have a different status in employment law.

    Employers should check if a worker is self-employed in:

    • tax law – whether they’re exempt from PAYE
    • employment law – whether they have an employee’s rights

    Individuals and their employers may have to pay unpaid tax and penalties, or lose entitlement to benefits, if their employment status is wrong.

    Checking if they’re exempt from PAYE

    Someone is probably self-employed and shouldn’t be paid through PAYE if most of the following are true:

    • they’re in business for themselves, are responsible for the success or failure of their business and can make a loss or a profit
    • they can decide what work they do and when, where or how to do it
    • they can hire someone else to do the work
    • they’re responsible for fixing any unsatisfactory work in their own time
    • their employer agrees a fixed price for their work – it doesn’t depend on how long the job takes to finish
    • they use their own money to buy business assets, cover running costs, and provide tools and equipment for their work
    • they can work for more than one client

    If someone’s employment status for PAYE still isn’t clear, you can use HMRC ’s Employment Status Indicator or call HMRC .

    Checking their employment rights

    Someone is probably self-employed and doesn’t have the rights of an employee if they’re exempt from PAYE and most of the following are also true:

    • they put in bids or give quotes to get work
    • they’re not under direct supervision when working
    • they submit invoices for the work they’ve done
    • they’re responsible for paying their own National Insurance and tax
    • they don’t get holiday or sick pay when they’re not working
    • they operate under a contract (sometimes known as a ‘contract for services’ or ‘consultancy agreement’) that uses terms like ‘self-employed’, ‘consultant’ or an ‘independent contractor’

    Contractors

    A contractor can be:

    • self-employed
    • a worker or an employee if they work for a client and are employed by an agency

    There’s a special scheme for self-employed contractors and sub-contractors working in the construction industry called the Construction Industry Scheme (CIS ).

    If someone becomes self-employed

    A worker must tell HMRC if they become self-employed.