The Right Home Loan for Medical Residents #bank #mortgage #rates


#physician mortgage loans

#

Are you a 1st year resident? Are you in the final year of your 5 year of residency? No matter where you are in your residency, our Physicianloans program is the best option for you. We offer the most stability and the most flexibility which is important during a period in your life when the only constant is change.

Your financial position can vary widely over the 3 – 5 year residency period. Depending on your program year, the size of house you are buying may vary widely as well.

Many features of our Physicianloans program help make your residency period so much smoother as it relates to your home:

  • No Money Down
  • No PMI – a great way to achieve lower monthly payments.
  • No Pre-Payment Penalty
  • Student Loans treated in a special manner – Making it much easier for you to qualify. Are you aware that standard loan guidelines, including Fannie Mae, must still count student loans payments even if the loan is deferred?
  • Low Rates – We keep our rates extremely low even with little to no money down and No PMI.
  • Flexible Terms: Select from our PhysicianLoans Adjustable Rate Mortgages (3-Year ARM; 5-Year ARM; 7-Year ARM; 10-Year ARM; or 15-Year ARM)

Contact us to learn more about how to take advantage of this loan.


PNC HOME HQ – Decide If the Time Is Right #mortgage #finance #calculator


#first time mortgage

#

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First-Time Home Buyer’s Basics

For most of us, buying a first home is a dream come true. However, it can also be a lengthy process where potential — and sometimes very costly — pitfalls trap the unprepared buyer. This guide will help you get prepared.

Decide If the Time Is Right

How do you know if you’re ready? Making the leap from renter to homeowner is a big decision. For some, renting may be the right choice. Because the “down payment” is most often limited to first and last month deposit, renting can be viewed as cheaper and more flexible in the short-term. Monthly rent payments are also generally “all in” and usually cover all property taxes, homeowners’ association fees and maintenance costs. Plus, renting can offer flexibility should circumstances unexpectedly change.

For others, however, buying is the right move to make. They’ve reached the point where they feel confident about staying in one place for a while and are established in their jobs with a dependable income. Their debt obligations – such as car loans, student loans and credit card payments – are manageable, and they’re interested in exploring how the traditional benefits of homeownership, like favorable tax treatment* and equity appreciation, can enhance their long term financial prospects. If that sounds like you, this guide will help you assess your current situation and better prepare you for the home-buying process.

* Consult your tax advisor

The Mortgage Process

Getting a mortgage doesn’t have to be intimidating. Find out how the process works, from getting prepared to closing.

Explore


  • Trouble Making Payments?

    We have loan modification and refinancing options for homeowners who are behind in payments or facing foreclosure.

    Explore


  • NMLS Consumer Website

    A free service for consumers to confirm the mortgage lender they wish to conduct business with is authorized for their state.

    WHAT WE OFFER

    CUSTOMER SUPPORT

    FOR PARTNERS

    OTHER RESOURCES

    CONTACT US


  • Is an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) Is Right for You? #50 #year #mortgage


    #what is an arm mortgage

    #

    Is an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) Is Right for You?

    What is an Adjustable Rate Mortgage?

    An adjustable rate mortgage. called an ARM for short, is a mortgage with an interest rate that is linked to an economic index. The interest rate, and your payments, are periodically adjusted up or down as the index changes.

    ARM Terminology

    An index is a guide that lenders use to measure interest rate changes. Common indexes used by lenders include the activity of one, three, and five-year Treasury securities, but there are many others.

    Each ARM is linked to a specific index.

    Think of the margin as the lender s markup. It is an interest rate that represents the lender s cost of doing business plus the profit they will make on the loan. The margin is added to the index rate to determine your total interest rate. It usually stays the same during the life of your home loan .

    The adjustment period is the period between potential interest rate adjustments.

    You may see an ARM described with figures such as 1-1, 3-1, and 5-1. The first figure in each set refers to the initial period of the loan, during which your interest rate will stay the same as it was on the day you signed your loan papers.

    The second number is the adjustment period, showing how often adjustments can be made to the rate after the initial period has ended. The examples above are all ARMs with annual adjustments–meaning adjustments could happen every year.

    If my payments can go up, why should I consider an ARM?

    The initial interest rate for an ARM is lower than that of a fixed rate mortgage. where the interest rate remains the same during the life of the loan. A lower rate means lower payments. which might help you qualify for a larger loan.

    How long do you plan to own the house?

    The possibility of rate increases isn t as much of a factor if you plan to sell the home within a few years.

    Do you expect your income to increase? If so, the extra funds might cover the higher payments that result from rate increases.

    Some ARMs can be converted to a fixed-rate mortgage. However, conversion fees could be high enough to take away all of the savings you saw with the initial lower rate.

    ARM Indexes

    While you can t dictate which index a lender uses, you can choose a loan and lender based on the index that will apply to the loan. Ask the lender how each index used has performed in the past. Your goal is to find an ARM that is linked to an index that has remained fairly stable over many years.

    When comparing lenders. consider both the index and the margin rate being offered.

    Discounted Rates and Buydowns

    When you re buying a home you might encounter sellers who offer to pay a buydown fee that allows the lender to offer you an initial rate that s lower than the sum of the index and the margin.

    New home builders sometimes offer that type of purchase package to help get people into their homes.

    The buydown rate will eventually expire and your payments could rise significantly if an ARM rate is adjusted upwards at the same time the discount expires.

    Keep in mind that sellers sometimes raise the price of a home by the amount they pay to buydown your loan. The extra cost may in time override any savings from the initial discount.

    Interest Rate Caps

    Rate caps limit how much interest you can be charged. There are two types of interest rate caps associated with ARMs.

    • Periodic caps limit the amount your interest rate can increase from one adjustment period to the next. Not all ARMs have periodic rate caps.
    • Overall caps limit how much the interest rate can increase over the life of the loan. Overall caps have been required by law since 1987.

    Payment Caps

    A payment cap limits how much your monthly payment can increase at each adjustment. ARMs with payment caps often do not have periodic rate caps.

    Carryovers

    If an interest rate cap held your interest down at an adjustment even though the index went up, the amount of the increase can be carried over to the next adjustment period.

    Beware of Negative Amortization

    Amortization takes place when payments are large enough to pay the interest due plus a portion of the principal.

    Negative amortization occurs when payments do not cover the cost of interest. The unpaid amount is added back to the loan, where it generates even more interest debt. If this continues you could make many payments, but still owe more than you did at the beginning of the loan.

    Negative amortization generally occurs when a loan has a payment cap that keeps monthly payments from covering the cost of interest.

    Lenders are required to give you written information to help you compare and select a mortgage. Don t hesitate to ask as many questions as it takes to help you understand every aspect of ARMs and other home loans that are offered to you.

    Get the Facts About Adjustable Rate Mortgages

    What Are the Risks of an Adjustable Rate Mortgage? Reducing Your Risks Consider the following issues before accepting an ARM.

    Discounted Rates – Buydowns
    Sellers sometimes pay a fee that allows the lender to offer you an initial rate that s lower than the sum of the index and the margin. The buydown rate will eventually expire.

    • The Double Whammy
      Your payments can rise significantly if your rate is adjusted upwards at the same time the discount expires.
    • Is a Discounted Rate Worthwhile?

    Sellers may raise the price of a home by the amount they pay to buydown your loan. The extra cost may in time override any savings from the initial discount.

    Interest Rate Caps

    Rate caps limit how much interest you can be charged. There are two types of interest rate caps associated with ARMs.

    • Periodic caps limit the amount your interest rate can increase from one adjustment period to the next. Not all ARMs have periodic rate caps.
    • Overall caps limit how much the interest rate can increase over the life of the loan. Overall caps have been required by law since 1987.

    Payment Caps
    A payment cap limits how much your monthly payment can increase at each adjustment. ARMs with payment caps often do not have periodic rate caps. Carryovers
    If an interest rate cap has held your interest down even though the index went up, the amount of the increase can be carried over to the next adjustment period.

    Negative Amortization
    Amortization takes place when payments are large enough to pay the interest due plus a portion of the principle.

    • Negative amortization occurs when payments do not cover the cost of interest. The unpaid amount is added back to the loan, where it generates even more interest debt. If this continues you could make many payments, but still owe more than you did at the beginning of the loan.
    • Negative amortization generally occurs when a loan has a payment cap that keeps monthly payments from covering the cost of interest.
    • Negative amortization does not have as much of an impact when real estate is appreciating nicely, so the lower payments may be more attractive to you than paying down the principle.

    Lenders are required to give you written information to help you compare and select a mortgage. Don t hesitate to ask as many questions as it takes to help you understand every aspect of your loan


    The Right Home Loan for Medical Residents #amortization #formula


    #physician mortgage loans

    #

    Are you a 1st year resident? Are you in the final year of your 5 year of residency? No matter where you are in your residency, our Physicianloans program is the best option for you. We offer the most stability and the most flexibility which is important during a period in your life when the only constant is change.

    Your financial position can vary widely over the 3 – 5 year residency period. Depending on your program year, the size of house you are buying may vary widely as well.

    Many features of our Physicianloans program help make your residency period so much smoother as it relates to your home:

    • No Money Down
    • No PMI – a great way to achieve lower monthly payments.
    • No Pre-Payment Penalty
    • Student Loans treated in a special manner – Making it much easier for you to qualify. Are you aware that standard loan guidelines, including Fannie Mae, must still count student loans payments even if the loan is deferred?
    • Low Rates – We keep our rates extremely low even with little to no money down and No PMI.
    • Flexible Terms: Select from our PhysicianLoans Adjustable Rate Mortgages (3-Year ARM; 5-Year ARM; 7-Year ARM; 10-Year ARM; or 15-Year ARM)

    Contact us to learn more about how to take advantage of this loan.


    Is an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) Is Right for You? #mortgage #calculatro


    #what is an arm mortgage

    #

    Is an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) Is Right for You?

    What is an Adjustable Rate Mortgage?

    An adjustable rate mortgage. called an ARM for short, is a mortgage with an interest rate that is linked to an economic index. The interest rate, and your payments, are periodically adjusted up or down as the index changes.

    ARM Terminology

    An index is a guide that lenders use to measure interest rate changes. Common indexes used by lenders include the activity of one, three, and five-year Treasury securities, but there are many others.

    Each ARM is linked to a specific index.

    Think of the margin as the lender s markup. It is an interest rate that represents the lender s cost of doing business plus the profit they will make on the loan. The margin is added to the index rate to determine your total interest rate. It usually stays the same during the life of your home loan .

    The adjustment period is the period between potential interest rate adjustments.

    You may see an ARM described with figures such as 1-1, 3-1, and 5-1. The first figure in each set refers to the initial period of the loan, during which your interest rate will stay the same as it was on the day you signed your loan papers.

    The second number is the adjustment period, showing how often adjustments can be made to the rate after the initial period has ended. The examples above are all ARMs with annual adjustments–meaning adjustments could happen every year.

    If my payments can go up, why should I consider an ARM?

    The initial interest rate for an ARM is lower than that of a fixed rate mortgage. where the interest rate remains the same during the life of the loan. A lower rate means lower payments. which might help you qualify for a larger loan.

    How long do you plan to own the house?

    The possibility of rate increases isn t as much of a factor if you plan to sell the home within a few years.

    Do you expect your income to increase? If so, the extra funds might cover the higher payments that result from rate increases.

    Some ARMs can be converted to a fixed-rate mortgage. However, conversion fees could be high enough to take away all of the savings you saw with the initial lower rate.

    ARM Indexes

    While you can t dictate which index a lender uses, you can choose a loan and lender based on the index that will apply to the loan. Ask the lender how each index used has performed in the past. Your goal is to find an ARM that is linked to an index that has remained fairly stable over many years.

    When comparing lenders. consider both the index and the margin rate being offered.

    Discounted Rates and Buydowns

    When you re buying a home you might encounter sellers who offer to pay a buydown fee that allows the lender to offer you an initial rate that s lower than the sum of the index and the margin.

    New home builders sometimes offer that type of purchase package to help get people into their homes.

    The buydown rate will eventually expire and your payments could rise significantly if an ARM rate is adjusted upwards at the same time the discount expires.

    Keep in mind that sellers sometimes raise the price of a home by the amount they pay to buydown your loan. The extra cost may in time override any savings from the initial discount.

    Interest Rate Caps

    Rate caps limit how much interest you can be charged. There are two types of interest rate caps associated with ARMs.

    • Periodic caps limit the amount your interest rate can increase from one adjustment period to the next. Not all ARMs have periodic rate caps.
    • Overall caps limit how much the interest rate can increase over the life of the loan. Overall caps have been required by law since 1987.

    Payment Caps

    A payment cap limits how much your monthly payment can increase at each adjustment. ARMs with payment caps often do not have periodic rate caps.

    Carryovers

    If an interest rate cap held your interest down at an adjustment even though the index went up, the amount of the increase can be carried over to the next adjustment period.

    Beware of Negative Amortization

    Amortization takes place when payments are large enough to pay the interest due plus a portion of the principal.

    Negative amortization occurs when payments do not cover the cost of interest. The unpaid amount is added back to the loan, where it generates even more interest debt. If this continues you could make many payments, but still owe more than you did at the beginning of the loan.

    Negative amortization generally occurs when a loan has a payment cap that keeps monthly payments from covering the cost of interest.

    Lenders are required to give you written information to help you compare and select a mortgage. Don t hesitate to ask as many questions as it takes to help you understand every aspect of ARMs and other home loans that are offered to you.

    Get the Facts About Adjustable Rate Mortgages

    What Are the Risks of an Adjustable Rate Mortgage? Reducing Your Risks Consider the following issues before accepting an ARM.

    Discounted Rates – Buydowns
    Sellers sometimes pay a fee that allows the lender to offer you an initial rate that s lower than the sum of the index and the margin. The buydown rate will eventually expire.

    • The Double Whammy
      Your payments can rise significantly if your rate is adjusted upwards at the same time the discount expires.
    • Is a Discounted Rate Worthwhile?

    Sellers may raise the price of a home by the amount they pay to buydown your loan. The extra cost may in time override any savings from the initial discount.

    Interest Rate Caps

    Rate caps limit how much interest you can be charged. There are two types of interest rate caps associated with ARMs.

    • Periodic caps limit the amount your interest rate can increase from one adjustment period to the next. Not all ARMs have periodic rate caps.
    • Overall caps limit how much the interest rate can increase over the life of the loan. Overall caps have been required by law since 1987.

    Payment Caps
    A payment cap limits how much your monthly payment can increase at each adjustment. ARMs with payment caps often do not have periodic rate caps. Carryovers
    If an interest rate cap has held your interest down even though the index went up, the amount of the increase can be carried over to the next adjustment period.

    Negative Amortization
    Amortization takes place when payments are large enough to pay the interest due plus a portion of the principle.

    • Negative amortization occurs when payments do not cover the cost of interest. The unpaid amount is added back to the loan, where it generates even more interest debt. If this continues you could make many payments, but still owe more than you did at the beginning of the loan.
    • Negative amortization generally occurs when a loan has a payment cap that keeps monthly payments from covering the cost of interest.
    • Negative amortization does not have as much of an impact when real estate is appreciating nicely, so the lower payments may be more attractive to you than paying down the principle.

    Lenders are required to give you written information to help you compare and select a mortgage. Don t hesitate to ask as many questions as it takes to help you understand every aspect of your loan


    Is Online Learning Right For Me? Visual Academy #which #online #college #is #right #for #me


    #

    OnlineSchools.org

    Is Online Learning Right For Me?

    While many people envision a college student as a recent graduate of high school moving away from home for the first time, today’s college students vary widely in age, ethnicity, and level of work experience. Unemployment fluctuations tend to push many adults into post-secondary education. This growing number of diverse would-be students has created a high demand for distance education programs, and institutions of higher learning are responding by offering more and more online degrees.

    While public perception of online degree programs was once largely negative, studies show that well over half of today’s company executives and business owners are familiar with online degrees, and around 83% of these say that they believe online programs are as credible as traditional degrees. And, as students become increasingly comfortable with Internet technology, their online grades are also improving. A 2009 study from the U.S. Department of Education reported that the average online student actually performed better than students in traditional classes. As a result of increased public confidence, the demand for online programs is currently growing at a faster rate than the demand for traditional programs. In fact, total enrollment for online programming grew from 13.5% to 23.5% between 2004 and 2008, and the numbers continue to climb.

    Students pursuing online education vary widely in terms of age, profession and level of education. Although the largest percentage of online students is in the 41 to 45-year-old age group, the average age of online learners is 34, with a 53% female majority. Additionally, most online students have at least a high school diploma or GED, while nearly half have an associate’s degree, 20% a bachelor’s degree, and 2% a master’s degree. For students enrolled in an online education program, the average graduation rate is 71%, around 15% lower than graduate rates at traditional schools.

    Online programs are typically available for certificates, associate’s, bachelor’s and master’s degrees. A few disciplines even offer online doctoral programs, although therse are much less common. Online courses are especially convenient and popular for students who work full-time jobs or have inflexible daytime schedules. In fact, 81% of distance learners are employed when they enroll, and 41% receive tuition reimbursement from their employers. Additional benefits of online degrees include not having to commute to a campus as well as the ability to pursue an area of study that may not be available at local colleges and universities.

    In spite of the multiple advantages of pursuing online degrees, there are also several challenges. Although popular perceptions are constantly changing, there is evidence that a negative bias toward online degrees still exists. For instance, several studies have indicated that employers are more likely to hire a job candidate who has a degree from a brick-and-mortar institution rather than an online school. In order to improve their chances on the job market, it is especially important that online learners make sure that their programs are accredited by the appropriate organizations. Accreditation is a quality control process that ensures colleges and degree programs meet specific educational requirements. Additionally, a program’s accreditation status can impact a student’s eligibility to receive financial aid, since federal assistance programs only approve loans and grants for students who are enrolled at accredited schools.

    Other challenges of distance learning include the fact that online learners are expected to possess a high level of self-discipline, since they do not have to report to class every week and must manage their study time independently. Distance learners must also be comfortable with a lower level of student and faculty interaction than they would receive in a traditional classroom setting. Finally, completing an online degree requires students to have reliable access to the Internet as well as up-to-date computer software and hardware.

    If reading about the advantages and disadvantages of online learning has encouraged you to consider a degree in education, both online and on-site education programs will teach you how to use different instructional methods to create lessons for all types of learners. However, if you are interested in creating user-friendly software that facilitates a successful online learning experience, a degree in software development will provide you with the skills that you need to design, create and test new educational software. Another way to get directly involved in improving distance learning is to study web design, where you will learn how to create and maintain the actual websites and supplemental materials that online students use.


    How to get a mortgage right now, even with bad credit #land #mortgage


    #poor credit mortgage

    #

    How to get a mortgage right now, even with bad credit

    This month in
    Housing Wire magazine

    The winners of our Insiders award are people who get things done, who are known throughout their companies as the “go-to” person in their department or division. They provide expertise in areas as diverse as operations, compliance and client services, but also have a reputation for going above and beyond their assigned roles to help out their colleagues, their companies and their clients.

    Feature

    In May of 2016 Airbnb had almost 1.4 listings on the site and raised its revenue projection for this year to more than $900 million. But the site impacts more than just hotel chains. As more investors, not just homeowners, use the site to rent out spare rooms — and even spare couches — it strains the supply of rental houses.

    Commentary

    A funny thing happened while the mortgage process became more automated. Rather than reduce human interaction, which some skeptics anticipated, automation technology is in fact having the opposite effect. It is enabling mortgage lending to become a people-first business once again.

    HousingWire.com

    HW Community

    Company

    Connect With Us


    PNC HOME HQ – Decide If the Time Is Right #home #loan #payment #calculator


    #first time mortgage

    #

    To get the most of this PNC experience,
    we recommend upgrading your browser.

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    First-Time Home Buyer’s Basics

    For most of us, buying a first home is a dream come true. However, it can also be a lengthy process where potential — and sometimes very costly — pitfalls trap the unprepared buyer. This guide will help you get prepared.

    Decide If the Time Is Right

    How do you know if you’re ready? Making the leap from renter to homeowner is a big decision. For some, renting may be the right choice. Because the “down payment” is most often limited to first and last month deposit, renting can be viewed as cheaper and more flexible in the short-term. Monthly rent payments are also generally “all in” and usually cover all property taxes, homeowners’ association fees and maintenance costs. Plus, renting can offer flexibility should circumstances unexpectedly change.

    For others, however, buying is the right move to make. They’ve reached the point where they feel confident about staying in one place for a while and are established in their jobs with a dependable income. Their debt obligations – such as car loans, student loans and credit card payments – are manageable, and they’re interested in exploring how the traditional benefits of homeownership, like favorable tax treatment* and equity appreciation, can enhance their long term financial prospects. If that sounds like you, this guide will help you assess your current situation and better prepare you for the home-buying process.

    * Consult your tax advisor

    The Mortgage Process

    Getting a mortgage doesn’t have to be intimidating. Find out how the process works, from getting prepared to closing.

    Explore


  • Trouble Making Payments?

    We have loan modification and refinancing options for homeowners who are behind in payments or facing foreclosure.

    Explore


  • NMLS Consumer Website

    A free service for consumers to confirm the mortgage lender they wish to conduct business with is authorized for their state.

    WHAT WE OFFER

    CUSTOMER SUPPORT

    FOR PARTNERS

    OTHER RESOURCES

    CONTACT US


  • PNC HOME HQ – Decide If the Time Is Right #mortgage #home


    #first time mortgage

    #

    To get the most of this PNC experience,
    we recommend upgrading your browser.

    PURCHASE

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    REFINANCE

    HOME EQUITY LOANS

    MORTGAGE

    HOME EQUITY

    Get Started

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    Home Equity Savings Calculator

    First-Time Home Buyer’s Basics

    For most of us, buying a first home is a dream come true. However, it can also be a lengthy process where potential — and sometimes very costly — pitfalls trap the unprepared buyer. This guide will help you get prepared.

    Decide If the Time Is Right

    How do you know if you’re ready? Making the leap from renter to homeowner is a big decision. For some, renting may be the right choice. Because the “down payment” is most often limited to first and last month deposit, renting can be viewed as cheaper and more flexible in the short-term. Monthly rent payments are also generally “all in” and usually cover all property taxes, homeowners’ association fees and maintenance costs. Plus, renting can offer flexibility should circumstances unexpectedly change.

    For others, however, buying is the right move to make. They’ve reached the point where they feel confident about staying in one place for a while and are established in their jobs with a dependable income. Their debt obligations – such as car loans, student loans and credit card payments – are manageable, and they’re interested in exploring how the traditional benefits of homeownership, like favorable tax treatment* and equity appreciation, can enhance their long term financial prospects. If that sounds like you, this guide will help you assess your current situation and better prepare you for the home-buying process.

    * Consult your tax advisor

    The Mortgage Process

    Getting a mortgage doesn’t have to be intimidating. Find out how the process works, from getting prepared to closing.

    Explore


  • Trouble Making Payments?

    We have loan modification and refinancing options for homeowners who are behind in payments or facing foreclosure.

    Explore


  • NMLS Consumer Website

    A free service for consumers to confirm the mortgage lender they wish to conduct business with is authorized for their state.

    WHAT WE OFFER

    CUSTOMER SUPPORT

    FOR PARTNERS

    OTHER RESOURCES

    CONTACT US


  • PNC HOME HQ – Decide If the Time Is Right #refinance #mortgage


    #first time mortgage

    #

    To get the most of this PNC experience,
    we recommend upgrading your browser.

    PURCHASE

    REFINANCE

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    REFINANCE

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    MORTGAGE

    HOME EQUITY

    Get Started

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    Home Equity Savings Calculator

    First-Time Home Buyer’s Basics

    For most of us, buying a first home is a dream come true. However, it can also be a lengthy process where potential — and sometimes very costly — pitfalls trap the unprepared buyer. This guide will help you get prepared.

    Decide If the Time Is Right

    How do you know if you’re ready? Making the leap from renter to homeowner is a big decision. For some, renting may be the right choice. Because the “down payment” is most often limited to first and last month deposit, renting can be viewed as cheaper and more flexible in the short-term. Monthly rent payments are also generally “all in” and usually cover all property taxes, homeowners’ association fees and maintenance costs. Plus, renting can offer flexibility should circumstances unexpectedly change.

    For others, however, buying is the right move to make. They’ve reached the point where they feel confident about staying in one place for a while and are established in their jobs with a dependable income. Their debt obligations – such as car loans, student loans and credit card payments – are manageable, and they’re interested in exploring how the traditional benefits of homeownership, like favorable tax treatment* and equity appreciation, can enhance their long term financial prospects. If that sounds like you, this guide will help you assess your current situation and better prepare you for the home-buying process.

    * Consult your tax advisor

    The Mortgage Process

    Getting a mortgage doesn’t have to be intimidating. Find out how the process works, from getting prepared to closing.

    Explore


  • Trouble Making Payments?

    We have loan modification and refinancing options for homeowners who are behind in payments or facing foreclosure.

    Explore


  • NMLS Consumer Website

    A free service for consumers to confirm the mortgage lender they wish to conduct business with is authorized for their state.

    WHAT WE OFFER

    CUSTOMER SUPPORT

    FOR PARTNERS

    OTHER RESOURCES

    CONTACT US