Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums #mortgage #broker #license


#obama mortgage

#

Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums

In an effort to expand homeownership among lower-income buyers, President Barack Obama plans to cut mortgage-insurance premiums charged by a government agency.

The annual fees the Federal Housing Administration charges to guarantee mortgages will be cut by 0.5 percentage point, to 0.85 percent of the loan balance, Julian Castro, secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, said today during a conference call with reporters. Under the new premium structure, FHA estimates that 2 million borrowers will be able to save an average of $900 annually over the next three years if they purchase or refinance homes.

Shares of private insurers that compete with the FHA fell on the news, which Obama plans to discuss during a visit to Phoenix tomorrow.

“We believe this is striking a very good balance between being fiscally responsible and also enhancing homeownership opportunities,” Castro said.

‘Locked Out of Market’

The FHA has been increasing premiums since 2011 to offset losses caused by defaults on mortgages it backed after the housing bubble burst. Housing industry participants say the increases in annual fees, which are now at 1.35 percent of the loan balance, are squeezing buyers with modest incomes out of the market.

“Lots of people have been locked out of the market, particularly lower-wealth borrowers and borrowers of color, by the high prices at FHA,” said Julia Gordon, director of housing finance and policy at the Center for American Progress, a group affiliated with Democrats. The premium cut “does put homeownership within the reach of more people.”

The FHA estimates that 250,000 first-time homebuyers will enter the market after the premium reductions.

In addition to its annual premiums, the FHA also charges borrowers an upfront fee, which is currently set at 1.75 percent of the loan balance and is not slated to change.

‘Broken FHA’

Democrats and housing groups say reducing FHA fees will help the agency’s bottom line because it will boost the volume of lending, which declined when homebuyers had to pay more to obtain loans. A December study by the Mortgage Bankers Association said the premium increases had reduced the value of the insurance fund by $4.4 billion as higher costs drove away creditworthy borrowers.

Republicans have said premium cuts should be off the table because the agency’s insurance fund remains below legally required levels. House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling said last month that “a broke FHA is a broken FHA.”

“This sounds like a move in the wrong direction,” said Mark Calabria, director of financial regulation studies at the Cato Institute, which supports free markets. “FHA has a portfolio of poor quality loans. This will end up costing the taxpayer considerably.”

The agency is required to keep enough cash on hand to cover all projected losses in its $1.1 trillion portfolio. The insurance fund required a $1.7 billion draw from the Treasury Department last year. In fiscal 2014, the fund posted its first positive balance in two years.

Shares Slide

The fund must also maintain a cushion of 2 percent of its value, a level it isn’t projected to reach until fiscal 2016.

Castro, who is scheduled to accompany Obama to Phoenix, said the fee cut would have a “marginal” impact on the insurance fund.

Radian Group Inc. which sells insurance to homebuyers, slid 5.5 percent to $15.62 at 1:53 p.m. in New York trading. MGIC Investment Corp. slumped 4.7 percent percent and Essent Group Ltd. fell 9.4 percent.

Radian climbed 18 percent last year after more than doubling in both 2012 and 2013 and had said it benefited as private companies gained market share from the government.

Mortgage insurance helps cover losses when homeowners default and foreclosures fail to recoup costs. The coverage is typically required when borrowers’ down payments are less than 20 percent of a home’s price.

The FHA had a 30 percent share of the mortgage insurance market in the third quarter of last year, down from about 69 percent in 2009, according to data from Inside Mortgage Finance. Private firms wrote 42 percent of the coverage in last year’s third quarter, and a government program for veterans accounted for most of the remainder.

Some Ginnie Mae-guaranteed securities backed by FHA loans also declined on concern that more borrowers will find it worthwhile to refinance, repaying debt that’s trading at higher prices at face value. Bonds with 3 percent coupons fell by 0.15 cent on the dollar more than similar-duration Treasuries as of 11 a.m. in New York, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, after typically outperforming government debt when bond prices have dropped in recent months.

Before it’s here, it’s on the Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE


Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums #arm #rates


#obama mortgage

#

Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums

In an effort to expand homeownership among lower-income buyers, President Barack Obama plans to cut mortgage-insurance premiums charged by a government agency.

The annual fees the Federal Housing Administration charges to guarantee mortgages will be cut by 0.5 percentage point, to 0.85 percent of the loan balance, Julian Castro, secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, said today during a conference call with reporters. Under the new premium structure, FHA estimates that 2 million borrowers will be able to save an average of $900 annually over the next three years if they purchase or refinance homes.

Shares of private insurers that compete with the FHA fell on the news, which Obama plans to discuss during a visit to Phoenix tomorrow.

“We believe this is striking a very good balance between being fiscally responsible and also enhancing homeownership opportunities,” Castro said.

‘Locked Out of Market’

The FHA has been increasing premiums since 2011 to offset losses caused by defaults on mortgages it backed after the housing bubble burst. Housing industry participants say the increases in annual fees, which are now at 1.35 percent of the loan balance, are squeezing buyers with modest incomes out of the market.

“Lots of people have been locked out of the market, particularly lower-wealth borrowers and borrowers of color, by the high prices at FHA,” said Julia Gordon, director of housing finance and policy at the Center for American Progress, a group affiliated with Democrats. The premium cut “does put homeownership within the reach of more people.”

The FHA estimates that 250,000 first-time homebuyers will enter the market after the premium reductions.

In addition to its annual premiums, the FHA also charges borrowers an upfront fee, which is currently set at 1.75 percent of the loan balance and is not slated to change.

‘Broken FHA’

Democrats and housing groups say reducing FHA fees will help the agency’s bottom line because it will boost the volume of lending, which declined when homebuyers had to pay more to obtain loans. A December study by the Mortgage Bankers Association said the premium increases had reduced the value of the insurance fund by $4.4 billion as higher costs drove away creditworthy borrowers.

Republicans have said premium cuts should be off the table because the agency’s insurance fund remains below legally required levels. House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling said last month that “a broke FHA is a broken FHA.”

“This sounds like a move in the wrong direction,” said Mark Calabria, director of financial regulation studies at the Cato Institute, which supports free markets. “FHA has a portfolio of poor quality loans. This will end up costing the taxpayer considerably.”

The agency is required to keep enough cash on hand to cover all projected losses in its $1.1 trillion portfolio. The insurance fund required a $1.7 billion draw from the Treasury Department last year. In fiscal 2014, the fund posted its first positive balance in two years.

Shares Slide

The fund must also maintain a cushion of 2 percent of its value, a level it isn’t projected to reach until fiscal 2016.

Castro, who is scheduled to accompany Obama to Phoenix, said the fee cut would have a “marginal” impact on the insurance fund.

Radian Group Inc. which sells insurance to homebuyers, slid 5.5 percent to $15.62 at 1:53 p.m. in New York trading. MGIC Investment Corp. slumped 4.7 percent percent and Essent Group Ltd. fell 9.4 percent.

Radian climbed 18 percent last year after more than doubling in both 2012 and 2013 and had said it benefited as private companies gained market share from the government.

Mortgage insurance helps cover losses when homeowners default and foreclosures fail to recoup costs. The coverage is typically required when borrowers’ down payments are less than 20 percent of a home’s price.

The FHA had a 30 percent share of the mortgage insurance market in the third quarter of last year, down from about 69 percent in 2009, according to data from Inside Mortgage Finance. Private firms wrote 42 percent of the coverage in last year’s third quarter, and a government program for veterans accounted for most of the remainder.

Some Ginnie Mae-guaranteed securities backed by FHA loans also declined on concern that more borrowers will find it worthwhile to refinance, repaying debt that’s trading at higher prices at face value. Bonds with 3 percent coupons fell by 0.15 cent on the dollar more than similar-duration Treasuries as of 11 a.m. in New York, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, after typically outperforming government debt when bond prices have dropped in recent months.

Before it’s here, it’s on the Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE


Premiums rising faster than eight years before Obamacare #insurance #premiums #rising


#

Report: Premiums rising faster than eight years before Obamacare COMBINED

Health insurance premiums have risen more after Obamacare than the average premium increases over the eight years before it became law, according to the private health exchange eHealthInsurance.

The individual market for health insurance has seen premiums rise by 39 percent since February 2013, eHealth reports. Without a subsidy, the average individual premium is now $274 a month. Families have been hit even harder with an average increase of 56 percent over the same period average premiums are now $663 per family, over $426 last year.

Between 2005 and 2013, average premiums for individual plans increased 37 percent and average family premiums were upped 31 percent. So they have risen faster under Obamacare than in the previous eight years.

An important caveat is that eHealth s prices don t include subsidies, so the prices for anyone earning between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty level will be lower. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has repeatedly claimed patients will pay as little as $18 per month, without noting the taxpayer cost.

Premiums are being hiked across the board for several reasons, but the biggest contributor is the Obama administration s highly touted essential health benefits, services that insurers on and off exchanges must provide .

Some benefits, such as emergency and laboratory services, are uncontroversial. But others, like maternity, newborn and pediatric services, are causing headaches for huge swaths of the population that don t need them. Anyone past childbearing age, single men, the infertile, even nuns their premiums are rising as well, because their plans must, by law, provide more services.

But premiums aren t the only key to health care costs deductibles and out-of-pocket costs like co-pays are also rising. When it comes to employer health plans alone, four out of five U.S. companies have increased deductibles or are considering doing so. (RELATED: 4 of 5 companies may hike deductibles due to Obamacare )

Prices may be people away from purchasing health insurance. The latest survey from consulting firm McKinsey found that half of those who haven t purchased health insurance yet this year cited their inability to pay the premium.


Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums #mortgage #assistance #program


#obama mortgage

#

Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums

In an effort to expand homeownership among lower-income buyers, President Barack Obama plans to cut mortgage-insurance premiums charged by a government agency.

The annual fees the Federal Housing Administration charges to guarantee mortgages will be cut by 0.5 percentage point, to 0.85 percent of the loan balance, Julian Castro, secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, said today during a conference call with reporters. Under the new premium structure, FHA estimates that 2 million borrowers will be able to save an average of $900 annually over the next three years if they purchase or refinance homes.

Shares of private insurers that compete with the FHA fell on the news, which Obama plans to discuss during a visit to Phoenix tomorrow.

“We believe this is striking a very good balance between being fiscally responsible and also enhancing homeownership opportunities,” Castro said.

‘Locked Out of Market’

The FHA has been increasing premiums since 2011 to offset losses caused by defaults on mortgages it backed after the housing bubble burst. Housing industry participants say the increases in annual fees, which are now at 1.35 percent of the loan balance, are squeezing buyers with modest incomes out of the market.

“Lots of people have been locked out of the market, particularly lower-wealth borrowers and borrowers of color, by the high prices at FHA,” said Julia Gordon, director of housing finance and policy at the Center for American Progress, a group affiliated with Democrats. The premium cut “does put homeownership within the reach of more people.”

The FHA estimates that 250,000 first-time homebuyers will enter the market after the premium reductions.

In addition to its annual premiums, the FHA also charges borrowers an upfront fee, which is currently set at 1.75 percent of the loan balance and is not slated to change.

‘Broken FHA’

Democrats and housing groups say reducing FHA fees will help the agency’s bottom line because it will boost the volume of lending, which declined when homebuyers had to pay more to obtain loans. A December study by the Mortgage Bankers Association said the premium increases had reduced the value of the insurance fund by $4.4 billion as higher costs drove away creditworthy borrowers.

Republicans have said premium cuts should be off the table because the agency’s insurance fund remains below legally required levels. House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling said last month that “a broke FHA is a broken FHA.”

“This sounds like a move in the wrong direction,” said Mark Calabria, director of financial regulation studies at the Cato Institute, which supports free markets. “FHA has a portfolio of poor quality loans. This will end up costing the taxpayer considerably.”

The agency is required to keep enough cash on hand to cover all projected losses in its $1.1 trillion portfolio. The insurance fund required a $1.7 billion draw from the Treasury Department last year. In fiscal 2014, the fund posted its first positive balance in two years.

Shares Slide

The fund must also maintain a cushion of 2 percent of its value, a level it isn’t projected to reach until fiscal 2016.

Castro, who is scheduled to accompany Obama to Phoenix, said the fee cut would have a “marginal” impact on the insurance fund.

Radian Group Inc. which sells insurance to homebuyers, slid 5.5 percent to $15.62 at 1:53 p.m. in New York trading. MGIC Investment Corp. slumped 4.7 percent percent and Essent Group Ltd. fell 9.4 percent.

Radian climbed 18 percent last year after more than doubling in both 2012 and 2013 and had said it benefited as private companies gained market share from the government.

Mortgage insurance helps cover losses when homeowners default and foreclosures fail to recoup costs. The coverage is typically required when borrowers’ down payments are less than 20 percent of a home’s price.

The FHA had a 30 percent share of the mortgage insurance market in the third quarter of last year, down from about 69 percent in 2009, according to data from Inside Mortgage Finance. Private firms wrote 42 percent of the coverage in last year’s third quarter, and a government program for veterans accounted for most of the remainder.

Some Ginnie Mae-guaranteed securities backed by FHA loans also declined on concern that more borrowers will find it worthwhile to refinance, repaying debt that’s trading at higher prices at face value. Bonds with 3 percent coupons fell by 0.15 cent on the dollar more than similar-duration Treasuries as of 11 a.m. in New York, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, after typically outperforming government debt when bond prices have dropped in recent months.

Before it’s here, it’s on the Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE


Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums #calculator #for #mortgage


#obama mortgage

#

Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums

In an effort to expand homeownership among lower-income buyers, President Barack Obama plans to cut mortgage-insurance premiums charged by a government agency.

The annual fees the Federal Housing Administration charges to guarantee mortgages will be cut by 0.5 percentage point, to 0.85 percent of the loan balance, Julian Castro, secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, said today during a conference call with reporters. Under the new premium structure, FHA estimates that 2 million borrowers will be able to save an average of $900 annually over the next three years if they purchase or refinance homes.

Shares of private insurers that compete with the FHA fell on the news, which Obama plans to discuss during a visit to Phoenix tomorrow.

“We believe this is striking a very good balance between being fiscally responsible and also enhancing homeownership opportunities,” Castro said.

‘Locked Out of Market’

The FHA has been increasing premiums since 2011 to offset losses caused by defaults on mortgages it backed after the housing bubble burst. Housing industry participants say the increases in annual fees, which are now at 1.35 percent of the loan balance, are squeezing buyers with modest incomes out of the market.

“Lots of people have been locked out of the market, particularly lower-wealth borrowers and borrowers of color, by the high prices at FHA,” said Julia Gordon, director of housing finance and policy at the Center for American Progress, a group affiliated with Democrats. The premium cut “does put homeownership within the reach of more people.”

The FHA estimates that 250,000 first-time homebuyers will enter the market after the premium reductions.

In addition to its annual premiums, the FHA also charges borrowers an upfront fee, which is currently set at 1.75 percent of the loan balance and is not slated to change.

‘Broken FHA’

Democrats and housing groups say reducing FHA fees will help the agency’s bottom line because it will boost the volume of lending, which declined when homebuyers had to pay more to obtain loans. A December study by the Mortgage Bankers Association said the premium increases had reduced the value of the insurance fund by $4.4 billion as higher costs drove away creditworthy borrowers.

Republicans have said premium cuts should be off the table because the agency’s insurance fund remains below legally required levels. House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling said last month that “a broke FHA is a broken FHA.”

“This sounds like a move in the wrong direction,” said Mark Calabria, director of financial regulation studies at the Cato Institute, which supports free markets. “FHA has a portfolio of poor quality loans. This will end up costing the taxpayer considerably.”

The agency is required to keep enough cash on hand to cover all projected losses in its $1.1 trillion portfolio. The insurance fund required a $1.7 billion draw from the Treasury Department last year. In fiscal 2014, the fund posted its first positive balance in two years.

Shares Slide

The fund must also maintain a cushion of 2 percent of its value, a level it isn’t projected to reach until fiscal 2016.

Castro, who is scheduled to accompany Obama to Phoenix, said the fee cut would have a “marginal” impact on the insurance fund.

Radian Group Inc. which sells insurance to homebuyers, slid 5.5 percent to $15.62 at 1:53 p.m. in New York trading. MGIC Investment Corp. slumped 4.7 percent percent and Essent Group Ltd. fell 9.4 percent.

Radian climbed 18 percent last year after more than doubling in both 2012 and 2013 and had said it benefited as private companies gained market share from the government.

Mortgage insurance helps cover losses when homeowners default and foreclosures fail to recoup costs. The coverage is typically required when borrowers’ down payments are less than 20 percent of a home’s price.

The FHA had a 30 percent share of the mortgage insurance market in the third quarter of last year, down from about 69 percent in 2009, according to data from Inside Mortgage Finance. Private firms wrote 42 percent of the coverage in last year’s third quarter, and a government program for veterans accounted for most of the remainder.

Some Ginnie Mae-guaranteed securities backed by FHA loans also declined on concern that more borrowers will find it worthwhile to refinance, repaying debt that’s trading at higher prices at face value. Bonds with 3 percent coupons fell by 0.15 cent on the dollar more than similar-duration Treasuries as of 11 a.m. in New York, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, after typically outperforming government debt when bond prices have dropped in recent months.

Before it’s here, it’s on the Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE


Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums #mortgage #calcultor


#obama mortgage

#

Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums

In an effort to expand homeownership among lower-income buyers, President Barack Obama plans to cut mortgage-insurance premiums charged by a government agency.

The annual fees the Federal Housing Administration charges to guarantee mortgages will be cut by 0.5 percentage point, to 0.85 percent of the loan balance, Julian Castro, secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, said today during a conference call with reporters. Under the new premium structure, FHA estimates that 2 million borrowers will be able to save an average of $900 annually over the next three years if they purchase or refinance homes.

Shares of private insurers that compete with the FHA fell on the news, which Obama plans to discuss during a visit to Phoenix tomorrow.

“We believe this is striking a very good balance between being fiscally responsible and also enhancing homeownership opportunities,” Castro said.

‘Locked Out of Market’

The FHA has been increasing premiums since 2011 to offset losses caused by defaults on mortgages it backed after the housing bubble burst. Housing industry participants say the increases in annual fees, which are now at 1.35 percent of the loan balance, are squeezing buyers with modest incomes out of the market.

“Lots of people have been locked out of the market, particularly lower-wealth borrowers and borrowers of color, by the high prices at FHA,” said Julia Gordon, director of housing finance and policy at the Center for American Progress, a group affiliated with Democrats. The premium cut “does put homeownership within the reach of more people.”

The FHA estimates that 250,000 first-time homebuyers will enter the market after the premium reductions.

In addition to its annual premiums, the FHA also charges borrowers an upfront fee, which is currently set at 1.75 percent of the loan balance and is not slated to change.

‘Broken FHA’

Democrats and housing groups say reducing FHA fees will help the agency’s bottom line because it will boost the volume of lending, which declined when homebuyers had to pay more to obtain loans. A December study by the Mortgage Bankers Association said the premium increases had reduced the value of the insurance fund by $4.4 billion as higher costs drove away creditworthy borrowers.

Republicans have said premium cuts should be off the table because the agency’s insurance fund remains below legally required levels. House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling said last month that “a broke FHA is a broken FHA.”

“This sounds like a move in the wrong direction,” said Mark Calabria, director of financial regulation studies at the Cato Institute, which supports free markets. “FHA has a portfolio of poor quality loans. This will end up costing the taxpayer considerably.”

The agency is required to keep enough cash on hand to cover all projected losses in its $1.1 trillion portfolio. The insurance fund required a $1.7 billion draw from the Treasury Department last year. In fiscal 2014, the fund posted its first positive balance in two years.

Shares Slide

The fund must also maintain a cushion of 2 percent of its value, a level it isn’t projected to reach until fiscal 2016.

Castro, who is scheduled to accompany Obama to Phoenix, said the fee cut would have a “marginal” impact on the insurance fund.

Radian Group Inc. which sells insurance to homebuyers, slid 5.5 percent to $15.62 at 1:53 p.m. in New York trading. MGIC Investment Corp. slumped 4.7 percent percent and Essent Group Ltd. fell 9.4 percent.

Radian climbed 18 percent last year after more than doubling in both 2012 and 2013 and had said it benefited as private companies gained market share from the government.

Mortgage insurance helps cover losses when homeowners default and foreclosures fail to recoup costs. The coverage is typically required when borrowers’ down payments are less than 20 percent of a home’s price.

The FHA had a 30 percent share of the mortgage insurance market in the third quarter of last year, down from about 69 percent in 2009, according to data from Inside Mortgage Finance. Private firms wrote 42 percent of the coverage in last year’s third quarter, and a government program for veterans accounted for most of the remainder.

Some Ginnie Mae-guaranteed securities backed by FHA loans also declined on concern that more borrowers will find it worthwhile to refinance, repaying debt that’s trading at higher prices at face value. Bonds with 3 percent coupons fell by 0.15 cent on the dollar more than similar-duration Treasuries as of 11 a.m. in New York, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, after typically outperforming government debt when bond prices have dropped in recent months.

Before it’s here, it’s on the Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE


Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums #0 #down #mortgage


#obama mortgage

#

Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums

In an effort to expand homeownership among lower-income buyers, President Barack Obama plans to cut mortgage-insurance premiums charged by a government agency.

The annual fees the Federal Housing Administration charges to guarantee mortgages will be cut by 0.5 percentage point, to 0.85 percent of the loan balance, Julian Castro, secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, said today during a conference call with reporters. Under the new premium structure, FHA estimates that 2 million borrowers will be able to save an average of $900 annually over the next three years if they purchase or refinance homes.

Shares of private insurers that compete with the FHA fell on the news, which Obama plans to discuss during a visit to Phoenix tomorrow.

“We believe this is striking a very good balance between being fiscally responsible and also enhancing homeownership opportunities,” Castro said.

‘Locked Out of Market’

The FHA has been increasing premiums since 2011 to offset losses caused by defaults on mortgages it backed after the housing bubble burst. Housing industry participants say the increases in annual fees, which are now at 1.35 percent of the loan balance, are squeezing buyers with modest incomes out of the market.

“Lots of people have been locked out of the market, particularly lower-wealth borrowers and borrowers of color, by the high prices at FHA,” said Julia Gordon, director of housing finance and policy at the Center for American Progress, a group affiliated with Democrats. The premium cut “does put homeownership within the reach of more people.”

The FHA estimates that 250,000 first-time homebuyers will enter the market after the premium reductions.

In addition to its annual premiums, the FHA also charges borrowers an upfront fee, which is currently set at 1.75 percent of the loan balance and is not slated to change.

‘Broken FHA’

Democrats and housing groups say reducing FHA fees will help the agency’s bottom line because it will boost the volume of lending, which declined when homebuyers had to pay more to obtain loans. A December study by the Mortgage Bankers Association said the premium increases had reduced the value of the insurance fund by $4.4 billion as higher costs drove away creditworthy borrowers.

Republicans have said premium cuts should be off the table because the agency’s insurance fund remains below legally required levels. House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling said last month that “a broke FHA is a broken FHA.”

“This sounds like a move in the wrong direction,” said Mark Calabria, director of financial regulation studies at the Cato Institute, which supports free markets. “FHA has a portfolio of poor quality loans. This will end up costing the taxpayer considerably.”

The agency is required to keep enough cash on hand to cover all projected losses in its $1.1 trillion portfolio. The insurance fund required a $1.7 billion draw from the Treasury Department last year. In fiscal 2014, the fund posted its first positive balance in two years.

Shares Slide

The fund must also maintain a cushion of 2 percent of its value, a level it isn’t projected to reach until fiscal 2016.

Castro, who is scheduled to accompany Obama to Phoenix, said the fee cut would have a “marginal” impact on the insurance fund.

Radian Group Inc. which sells insurance to homebuyers, slid 5.5 percent to $15.62 at 1:53 p.m. in New York trading. MGIC Investment Corp. slumped 4.7 percent percent and Essent Group Ltd. fell 9.4 percent.

Radian climbed 18 percent last year after more than doubling in both 2012 and 2013 and had said it benefited as private companies gained market share from the government.

Mortgage insurance helps cover losses when homeowners default and foreclosures fail to recoup costs. The coverage is typically required when borrowers’ down payments are less than 20 percent of a home’s price.

The FHA had a 30 percent share of the mortgage insurance market in the third quarter of last year, down from about 69 percent in 2009, according to data from Inside Mortgage Finance. Private firms wrote 42 percent of the coverage in last year’s third quarter, and a government program for veterans accounted for most of the remainder.

Some Ginnie Mae-guaranteed securities backed by FHA loans also declined on concern that more borrowers will find it worthwhile to refinance, repaying debt that’s trading at higher prices at face value. Bonds with 3 percent coupons fell by 0.15 cent on the dollar more than similar-duration Treasuries as of 11 a.m. in New York, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, after typically outperforming government debt when bond prices have dropped in recent months.

Before it’s here, it’s on the Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE


Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums #average #mortgage #payment


#obama mortgage

#

Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums

In an effort to expand homeownership among lower-income buyers, President Barack Obama plans to cut mortgage-insurance premiums charged by a government agency.

The annual fees the Federal Housing Administration charges to guarantee mortgages will be cut by 0.5 percentage point, to 0.85 percent of the loan balance, Julian Castro, secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, said today during a conference call with reporters. Under the new premium structure, FHA estimates that 2 million borrowers will be able to save an average of $900 annually over the next three years if they purchase or refinance homes.

Shares of private insurers that compete with the FHA fell on the news, which Obama plans to discuss during a visit to Phoenix tomorrow.

“We believe this is striking a very good balance between being fiscally responsible and also enhancing homeownership opportunities,” Castro said.

‘Locked Out of Market’

The FHA has been increasing premiums since 2011 to offset losses caused by defaults on mortgages it backed after the housing bubble burst. Housing industry participants say the increases in annual fees, which are now at 1.35 percent of the loan balance, are squeezing buyers with modest incomes out of the market.

“Lots of people have been locked out of the market, particularly lower-wealth borrowers and borrowers of color, by the high prices at FHA,” said Julia Gordon, director of housing finance and policy at the Center for American Progress, a group affiliated with Democrats. The premium cut “does put homeownership within the reach of more people.”

The FHA estimates that 250,000 first-time homebuyers will enter the market after the premium reductions.

In addition to its annual premiums, the FHA also charges borrowers an upfront fee, which is currently set at 1.75 percent of the loan balance and is not slated to change.

‘Broken FHA’

Democrats and housing groups say reducing FHA fees will help the agency’s bottom line because it will boost the volume of lending, which declined when homebuyers had to pay more to obtain loans. A December study by the Mortgage Bankers Association said the premium increases had reduced the value of the insurance fund by $4.4 billion as higher costs drove away creditworthy borrowers.

Republicans have said premium cuts should be off the table because the agency’s insurance fund remains below legally required levels. House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling said last month that “a broke FHA is a broken FHA.”

“This sounds like a move in the wrong direction,” said Mark Calabria, director of financial regulation studies at the Cato Institute, which supports free markets. “FHA has a portfolio of poor quality loans. This will end up costing the taxpayer considerably.”

The agency is required to keep enough cash on hand to cover all projected losses in its $1.1 trillion portfolio. The insurance fund required a $1.7 billion draw from the Treasury Department last year. In fiscal 2014, the fund posted its first positive balance in two years.

Shares Slide

The fund must also maintain a cushion of 2 percent of its value, a level it isn’t projected to reach until fiscal 2016.

Castro, who is scheduled to accompany Obama to Phoenix, said the fee cut would have a “marginal” impact on the insurance fund.

Radian Group Inc. which sells insurance to homebuyers, slid 5.5 percent to $15.62 at 1:53 p.m. in New York trading. MGIC Investment Corp. slumped 4.7 percent percent and Essent Group Ltd. fell 9.4 percent.

Radian climbed 18 percent last year after more than doubling in both 2012 and 2013 and had said it benefited as private companies gained market share from the government.

Mortgage insurance helps cover losses when homeowners default and foreclosures fail to recoup costs. The coverage is typically required when borrowers’ down payments are less than 20 percent of a home’s price.

The FHA had a 30 percent share of the mortgage insurance market in the third quarter of last year, down from about 69 percent in 2009, according to data from Inside Mortgage Finance. Private firms wrote 42 percent of the coverage in last year’s third quarter, and a government program for veterans accounted for most of the remainder.

Some Ginnie Mae-guaranteed securities backed by FHA loans also declined on concern that more borrowers will find it worthwhile to refinance, repaying debt that’s trading at higher prices at face value. Bonds with 3 percent coupons fell by 0.15 cent on the dollar more than similar-duration Treasuries as of 11 a.m. in New York, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, after typically outperforming government debt when bond prices have dropped in recent months.

Before it’s here, it’s on the Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE


Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums #mortgage #rate #tracker


#obama mortgage

#

Obama Said to Cut FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums

In an effort to expand homeownership among lower-income buyers, President Barack Obama plans to cut mortgage-insurance premiums charged by a government agency.

The annual fees the Federal Housing Administration charges to guarantee mortgages will be cut by 0.5 percentage point, to 0.85 percent of the loan balance, Julian Castro, secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, said today during a conference call with reporters. Under the new premium structure, FHA estimates that 2 million borrowers will be able to save an average of $900 annually over the next three years if they purchase or refinance homes.

Shares of private insurers that compete with the FHA fell on the news, which Obama plans to discuss during a visit to Phoenix tomorrow.

“We believe this is striking a very good balance between being fiscally responsible and also enhancing homeownership opportunities,” Castro said.

‘Locked Out of Market’

The FHA has been increasing premiums since 2011 to offset losses caused by defaults on mortgages it backed after the housing bubble burst. Housing industry participants say the increases in annual fees, which are now at 1.35 percent of the loan balance, are squeezing buyers with modest incomes out of the market.

“Lots of people have been locked out of the market, particularly lower-wealth borrowers and borrowers of color, by the high prices at FHA,” said Julia Gordon, director of housing finance and policy at the Center for American Progress, a group affiliated with Democrats. The premium cut “does put homeownership within the reach of more people.”

The FHA estimates that 250,000 first-time homebuyers will enter the market after the premium reductions.

In addition to its annual premiums, the FHA also charges borrowers an upfront fee, which is currently set at 1.75 percent of the loan balance and is not slated to change.

‘Broken FHA’

Democrats and housing groups say reducing FHA fees will help the agency’s bottom line because it will boost the volume of lending, which declined when homebuyers had to pay more to obtain loans. A December study by the Mortgage Bankers Association said the premium increases had reduced the value of the insurance fund by $4.4 billion as higher costs drove away creditworthy borrowers.

Republicans have said premium cuts should be off the table because the agency’s insurance fund remains below legally required levels. House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling said last month that “a broke FHA is a broken FHA.”

“This sounds like a move in the wrong direction,” said Mark Calabria, director of financial regulation studies at the Cato Institute, which supports free markets. “FHA has a portfolio of poor quality loans. This will end up costing the taxpayer considerably.”

The agency is required to keep enough cash on hand to cover all projected losses in its $1.1 trillion portfolio. The insurance fund required a $1.7 billion draw from the Treasury Department last year. In fiscal 2014, the fund posted its first positive balance in two years.

Shares Slide

The fund must also maintain a cushion of 2 percent of its value, a level it isn’t projected to reach until fiscal 2016.

Castro, who is scheduled to accompany Obama to Phoenix, said the fee cut would have a “marginal” impact on the insurance fund.

Radian Group Inc. which sells insurance to homebuyers, slid 5.5 percent to $15.62 at 1:53 p.m. in New York trading. MGIC Investment Corp. slumped 4.7 percent percent and Essent Group Ltd. fell 9.4 percent.

Radian climbed 18 percent last year after more than doubling in both 2012 and 2013 and had said it benefited as private companies gained market share from the government.

Mortgage insurance helps cover losses when homeowners default and foreclosures fail to recoup costs. The coverage is typically required when borrowers’ down payments are less than 20 percent of a home’s price.

The FHA had a 30 percent share of the mortgage insurance market in the third quarter of last year, down from about 69 percent in 2009, according to data from Inside Mortgage Finance. Private firms wrote 42 percent of the coverage in last year’s third quarter, and a government program for veterans accounted for most of the remainder.

Some Ginnie Mae-guaranteed securities backed by FHA loans also declined on concern that more borrowers will find it worthwhile to refinance, repaying debt that’s trading at higher prices at face value. Bonds with 3 percent coupons fell by 0.15 cent on the dollar more than similar-duration Treasuries as of 11 a.m. in New York, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, after typically outperforming government debt when bond prices have dropped in recent months.

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#Don t Be Fooled by the New FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums – The Motley Fool

Even though the FHA is reducing its mortgage insurance premiums, it s still not the best option.

TMFKWMatt82

Jan 25, 2015 at 11:07AM

Source: pallspera.com via Flickr.

Recently, it was announced that the Federal Housing Administration would lower the annual premium on its mortgage insurance from 1.35% of the outstanding loan balance to 0.85%. While this certainly makes FHA loans more affordable, the conventional alternatives are still better, especially for first-time buyers .

The new conventional loan options

In late 2014, Fannie Mae (NASDAQ OTC:FNMA ) and Freddie Mac (NASDAQ OTC:FMCC ) both announced new lending guidelines, as well as new lending programs for first-time homebuyers. Under both programs, borrowers who have a credit score of at least 620 can qualify for a conventional mortgage with just 3% down.

Borrowers will have to pay mortgage insurance, but given the new FHA reduction, the rates are likely to be pretty similar. So why should buyers choose conventional loans instead of the traditional FHA low-down-payment option?

It’s not just the price of the mortgage insurance

The reduced cost of FHA mortgage insurance doesn’t tell the whole story. The biggest difference between an FHA loan and conventional low-down-payment options is what happens a few years down the road.

Specifically, if you put the required 3.5% down on a 30-year FHA loan, you’ll be stuck paying mortgage insurance for the entire term of the loan, no matter how much of the loan you paid back. With conventional loans, you can request that your mortgage insurance be canceled once you’ve paid down the balance to 80% of the original value of your home. And the lender is required to terminate your mortgage insurance once you’re scheduled to pay your loan down to 78% of its original value, assuming you’re current on your payments and meet any other requirements your lender may have.

Generally, the “original value” refers to the appraised value of the home at the time your loan closed, but if your home’s value has declined the bank can use this as a reason to reject an early PMI drop request. The rules can be a bit tricky, but at least there is the option of getting rid of it.

The cost difference can add up

Obviously, if you pay your balance down to 80% of the home’s value in just a few years, the savings can be tremendous over the life of a 30-year loan.

However, let’s look at a scenario in which a borrower simply makes the minimum payments. Let’s say a buyer can take out either an FHA loan or a conventional loan for $200,000, and the mortgage insurance rate is the same in either case, at 0.85% of the loan balance. (The actual loan amounts would be slightly different due to the 3% and 3.5% down-payment amounts required respectively by the two loan types.)

At an interest rate of 4%, it would take the buyer just under 10 years to pay down the loan to 78% of the home’s original value, according to an amortization table from Bankrate. So, with the conventional loan option, over the first 10 years, the borrower would pay about $15,500 total in mortgage insurance, based on an annual payment of 0.85% of the remaining loan balance.

However, with an FHA loan, the mortgage insurance would stick around for all 30 years and add up to more than $31,000. That means the conventional borrower would save nearly $16,000 in mortgage insurance over the life of the loan.

Who should look into FHA?

Having said all that, an FHA mortgage could still be the best option for some borrowers. For example, the FHA has looser credit score requirements and gives low interest rates to low-credit borrowers. So, if you have a low (but acceptable) FICO score — say, 620 — you might qualify for a conventional loan, but you’ll likely pay a much higher interest rate than you would on an FHA loan.

According to myFICO.com, the national average 30-year conventional mortgage rate is more than 4.8% for borrowers in the lowest credit “tier” (scores between 620 and 639). On the other hand, as of this writing, banks are advertising FHA 30-year mortgage rates in the mid-3% range.

If your score is below 620, an FHA loan might be the only option available. You can get a 3.5% down FHA loan with a score as low as 580, and if you have a higher down payment, a score as low as 500 can qualify.

Finally, if you aren’t a first-time homebuyer, the 3% down-payment option on conventional loans won’t be an option for you.

The best choice for you

To sum it up, if you can qualify, a conventional loan is generally the better deal for low-down-payment borrowers. While there are some valid reasons for borrowers to pursue FHA loans, qualified buyers can save tens of thousands of dollars by going the conventional route.

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