Tax Planning for Owning a Second Home-Kiplinger #mortgage #claculator


#mortgage tax deduction

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Tax Planning for Owning a Second Home

If you are in the market for a second home, congratulations! Not only can you look forward to having a place to relax, you also can garner some tax benefits for that place in the mountains or at the beach. You can use several tax breaks:

See Also: Tax Planning for Life’s Major Events

Mortgage Interest

If you use the place as a second home — rather than renting it out as a business property — interest on the mortgage is deductible just as interest on the mortgage on your first home is. You can write off 100% of the interest you pay on up to $1.1 million of debt secured by your first and second homes that was used to acquire or improve the properties. (That’s a total of $1.1 million of debt, not $1.1 million on each home.) The rules that apply if you rent the place out are discussed later.

Property taxes. You can deduct property taxes on your second home, too. In fact, unlike the mortgage interest rule, you can deduct property taxes paid on any number of homes you own.

If You Rent the Home

Lots of second-home buyers rent their property part of the year to get others to help pay the bills. Very different tax rules apply depending on the breakdown between personal and rental use. If you rent the place out for 14 or fewer days during the year, you can pocket the cash tax-free. Even if you’re charging $10,000 a week, the IRS doesn’t want to hear about it. The house is considered a personal residence, so you deduct mortgage interest and property taxes just as you do for your principal home.

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Rent for more than 14 days, though, and you must report all rental income. You also get to deduct rental expenses, and that gets complicated because you need to allocate costs between the time the property is used for personal purposes and the time it is rented.

If you and your family use a beach house for 30 days during the year and it’s rented for 120 days, 80% (120 divided by 150) of your mortgage interest and property taxes, insurance premiums, utilities and other costs would be rental expenses. The entire amount you pay a property manager would be deductible, too. And you could claim depreciation deductions based on 80% of the value of the house. If a house is worth $200,000 (not counting the value of the land) and you’re depreciating 80%, a full year’s depreciation deduction would be $5,800. You can always deduct expenses up to the level of rental income you report.

But what if costs exceed what you take in? Whether a loss can shelter other income depends on two things: how much you use the property yourself and how high your income is.

If you use the place more than 14 days, or more than 10% of the number of days it is rented — whichever is more — it is considered a personal residence and the loss can’t be deducted. (But because it is a personal residence, the interest that doesn’t count as a rental expense — 20% in our example — can be deducted as a personal expense.)

If you limit personal use to 14 days or 10%, the vacation home is considered a business and up to $25,000 in losses might be deductible each year. That’s why lots of vacation homeowners hold down leisure use and spend lots of time “maintaining” the property. Fix-up days don’t count as personal use. The tax savings from the loss (up to $7,000 a year if you’re in the 28% tax bracket) help pay for the vacation home. Unfortunately, holding down personal use means forfeiting the write-off for the portion of mortgage interest that fails to qualify as either a rental or personal-residence expense.

We say such losses might be deductible because real estate losses are considered “passive losses” by the tax law. And, passive losses are generally not deductible. But, there’s an exception that might protect you. If your adjusted gross income (AGI) is less than $100,000, up to $25,000 of such losses can be deducted each year to offset income such as your salary. (AGI is basically income before subtracting your exemptions and deductions.) As income rises between $100,000 and $150,000, however, that $25,000 allowance disappears. Passive losses you can’t deduct can be stored up and used to offset taxable profit when you ultimately sell the vacation house.

Tax-Free Profit

Although the rule that allows home owners to take up to $500,000 of profit tax-free applies only to your principal residence, there is a way to extend the break to your second home: make it your principal residence before you sell. That’s not as wacky as it might sound. Nor is it as lucrative as it used to be.

Some retirees, for example, are selling the big family home and moving full time into what had been their vacation home. Before 2009, this had a very special tax appeal. Once you live in that home for two years, up to $500,000 of profit could be tax free — including appreciation in value during the years it was your second home. (Any profit attributable to depreciation while you rented the place, though, would be taxable. Depreciation reduces your tax basis in the property and therefore increases profit dollar for dollar.)

A few years ago, though, Congress cracked down on this break for taxpayers who covert a second home to a principal residence. A portion of the gain on a subsequent sale of the home is ineligible for the home-sale exclusion of up to $500,000, even if the seller meets the two-year ownership and use tests. The portion of the profit that’s subject to tax is based on the ratio of the time after 2008 when the house was a second home or a rental unit to the total time you owned it.

This can still be a great deal if you’ve owned your second home for many years before the law changed. Let’s say you have owned a vacation home for 18 years and make it your main residence in 2014. Two years later, you sell the place. Since the five years after 2008 the place was your second home (2009 through 2013) is 25% of the 20 years you owned the home, only 20% of the gain is taxed. The rest qualifies for the exclusion of up to $500,000.

Editor’s Picks From Kiplinger


Owning a Home: Loan Options > Consumer Financial Protection Bureau #interest #rates #today


#mortgage options

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Understand loan options

Chosen by 25-30% of buyers

What to know

Your monthly payments are more likely to be stable with a fixed-rate loan, so you might prefer this option if you value certainty about your loan costs over the long term. With a fixed-rate loan, your interest rate and monthly principal and interest payment will stay the same. Your total monthly payment can still change—for example, if your property taxes, homeowner’s insurance, or mortgage insurance might go up or down.

Adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) offer less predictability but may be cheaper in the short term. You may want to consider this option if, for example, you plan to move again within the initial fixed period of an ARM. In this case, future rate adjustments may not affect you. However, if you end up staying in your house longer than expected, you may end up paying a lot more. In the later years of an ARM, your interest rate changes based on the market. and your monthly principal and interest payment could go up a lot. even double. Learn more .

Explore rates for different interest rate types and see for yourself how the initial interest rate on an ARM compares to the rate on a fixed-rate mortgage.

Understanding adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs)

Most ARMs have two periods. During the first period, your interest rate is fixed and won’t change. During the second period, your rate goes up and down regularly based on market changes. Learn more about how adjustable rates change. Most ARMs have a 30-year loan term .

Here’s how an example ARM would work:

5 / 1 Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM)

Fixed period

This “5” is the number of years your initial interest rate will stay fixed.

Common fixed periods are 3, 5, 7, and 10 years.

Adjustable period

This “1” is the how often your rate will adjust after the fixed period ends.

The most common adjustment period is “1,” meaning you will get a new rate and new payment amount every year once the fixed period ends. Other, less common adjustment periods include “3” (once every 3 years) and “5” (once every 5 years). You will be notified in advance of the change .

ARMs can have other structures. Some ARMs may adjust more frequently, and there’s not a standard way that these types of loans are described. If you’re considering a nonstandard structure, make sure to carefully read the rules and ask questions about when and how your rate and payment can adjust.

Understand the fine print. ARMs include specific rules that dictate how your mortgage works. These rules control how your rate is calculated and how much your rate and payment can adjust. Not all lenders follow the same rules, so ask questions to make sure you understand how these rules work.

ARMs marketed to people with lower credit scores tend to be riskier for the borrower. If you have a credit score in the mid-600s or below, you might be offered ARMs that contain risky features like higher rates, rates that adjust more frequently, pre-payment penalties. and loan balances that can increase. Consult with multiple lenders and get a quote for an FHA loan as well. Then, you can compare all your options.

Loan type

Learn more Collapse

Conventional, FHA, or Special programs

Mortgage loans are organized into categories based on the size of the loan and whether they are part of a government program.

This choice affects:

  • How much you will need for a down payment
  • The total cost of your loan, including interest and mortgage insurance
  • How much you can borrow, and the house price range you can consider

Choosing the right loan type

Each loan type is designed for different situations. Sometimes, only one loan type will fit your situation. If multiple options fit your situation, try out scenarios and ask lenders to provide several quotes so you can see which type offers the best deal overall.

Conventional

Majority of loans

Typically cost less than FHA loans but can be harder to get

FHA

Low down payment

Available to those with lower credit scores

Special programs

  • VA: For veterans, servicemembers, or surviving spouses
  • USDA: For low- to middle-income borrowers in rural areas
  • Local: For low- to middle-income borrowers, first-time homebuyers, or public service employees

Loans are subject to basic government regulation. Generally, your lender must document and verify your income, employment, assets, debts, and credit history to determine whether you can afford to repay the loan. Learn more about the CFPB’s mortgage rules .

Ask lenders if the loan they are offering you meets the government’s Qualified Mortgage standard. Qualified Mortgages are those that are safest for you, the borrower.

Know the Process


Owning a Home: Loan Options > Consumer Financial Protection Bureau #mortgage #qualifier


#mortgage options

#

Understand loan options

Chosen by 25-30% of buyers

What to know

Your monthly payments are more likely to be stable with a fixed-rate loan, so you might prefer this option if you value certainty about your loan costs over the long term. With a fixed-rate loan, your interest rate and monthly principal and interest payment will stay the same. Your total monthly payment can still change—for example, if your property taxes, homeowner’s insurance, or mortgage insurance might go up or down.

Adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) offer less predictability but may be cheaper in the short term. You may want to consider this option if, for example, you plan to move again within the initial fixed period of an ARM. In this case, future rate adjustments may not affect you. However, if you end up staying in your house longer than expected, you may end up paying a lot more. In the later years of an ARM, your interest rate changes based on the market. and your monthly principal and interest payment could go up a lot. even double. Learn more .

Explore rates for different interest rate types and see for yourself how the initial interest rate on an ARM compares to the rate on a fixed-rate mortgage.

Understanding adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs)

Most ARMs have two periods. During the first period, your interest rate is fixed and won’t change. During the second period, your rate goes up and down regularly based on market changes. Learn more about how adjustable rates change. Most ARMs have a 30-year loan term .

Here’s how an example ARM would work:

5 / 1 Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM)

Fixed period

This “5” is the number of years your initial interest rate will stay fixed.

Common fixed periods are 3, 5, 7, and 10 years.

Adjustable period

This “1” is the how often your rate will adjust after the fixed period ends.

The most common adjustment period is “1,” meaning you will get a new rate and new payment amount every year once the fixed period ends. Other, less common adjustment periods include “3” (once every 3 years) and “5” (once every 5 years). You will be notified in advance of the change .

ARMs can have other structures. Some ARMs may adjust more frequently, and there’s not a standard way that these types of loans are described. If you’re considering a nonstandard structure, make sure to carefully read the rules and ask questions about when and how your rate and payment can adjust.

Understand the fine print. ARMs include specific rules that dictate how your mortgage works. These rules control how your rate is calculated and how much your rate and payment can adjust. Not all lenders follow the same rules, so ask questions to make sure you understand how these rules work.

ARMs marketed to people with lower credit scores tend to be riskier for the borrower. If you have a credit score in the mid-600s or below, you might be offered ARMs that contain risky features like higher rates, rates that adjust more frequently, pre-payment penalties. and loan balances that can increase. Consult with multiple lenders and get a quote for an FHA loan as well. Then, you can compare all your options.

Loan type

Learn more Collapse

Conventional, FHA, or Special programs

Mortgage loans are organized into categories based on the size of the loan and whether they are part of a government program.

This choice affects:

  • How much you will need for a down payment
  • The total cost of your loan, including interest and mortgage insurance
  • How much you can borrow, and the house price range you can consider

Choosing the right loan type

Each loan type is designed for different situations. Sometimes, only one loan type will fit your situation. If multiple options fit your situation, try out scenarios and ask lenders to provide several quotes so you can see which type offers the best deal overall.

Conventional

Majority of loans

Typically cost less than FHA loans but can be harder to get

FHA

Low down payment

Available to those with lower credit scores

Special programs

  • VA: For veterans, servicemembers, or surviving spouses
  • USDA: For low- to middle-income borrowers in rural areas
  • Local: For low- to middle-income borrowers, first-time homebuyers, or public service employees

Loans are subject to basic government regulation. Generally, your lender must document and verify your income, employment, assets, debts, and credit history to determine whether you can afford to repay the loan. Learn more about the CFPB’s mortgage rules .

Ask lenders if the loan they are offering you meets the government’s Qualified Mortgage standard. Qualified Mortgages are those that are safest for you, the borrower.

Know the Process


Owning a Home: Loan Options > Consumer Financial Protection Bureau #estimated #mortgage #payment


#mortgage options

#

Understand loan options

Chosen by 25-30% of buyers

What to know

Your monthly payments are more likely to be stable with a fixed-rate loan, so you might prefer this option if you value certainty about your loan costs over the long term. With a fixed-rate loan, your interest rate and monthly principal and interest payment will stay the same. Your total monthly payment can still change—for example, if your property taxes, homeowner’s insurance, or mortgage insurance might go up or down.

Adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) offer less predictability but may be cheaper in the short term. You may want to consider this option if, for example, you plan to move again within the initial fixed period of an ARM. In this case, future rate adjustments may not affect you. However, if you end up staying in your house longer than expected, you may end up paying a lot more. In the later years of an ARM, your interest rate changes based on the market. and your monthly principal and interest payment could go up a lot. even double. Learn more .

Explore rates for different interest rate types and see for yourself how the initial interest rate on an ARM compares to the rate on a fixed-rate mortgage.

Understanding adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs)

Most ARMs have two periods. During the first period, your interest rate is fixed and won’t change. During the second period, your rate goes up and down regularly based on market changes. Learn more about how adjustable rates change. Most ARMs have a 30-year loan term .

Here’s how an example ARM would work:

5 / 1 Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM)

Fixed period

This “5” is the number of years your initial interest rate will stay fixed.

Common fixed periods are 3, 5, 7, and 10 years.

Adjustable period

This “1” is the how often your rate will adjust after the fixed period ends.

The most common adjustment period is “1,” meaning you will get a new rate and new payment amount every year once the fixed period ends. Other, less common adjustment periods include “3” (once every 3 years) and “5” (once every 5 years). You will be notified in advance of the change .

ARMs can have other structures. Some ARMs may adjust more frequently, and there’s not a standard way that these types of loans are described. If you’re considering a nonstandard structure, make sure to carefully read the rules and ask questions about when and how your rate and payment can adjust.

Understand the fine print. ARMs include specific rules that dictate how your mortgage works. These rules control how your rate is calculated and how much your rate and payment can adjust. Not all lenders follow the same rules, so ask questions to make sure you understand how these rules work.

ARMs marketed to people with lower credit scores tend to be riskier for the borrower. If you have a credit score in the mid-600s or below, you might be offered ARMs that contain risky features like higher rates, rates that adjust more frequently, pre-payment penalties. and loan balances that can increase. Consult with multiple lenders and get a quote for an FHA loan as well. Then, you can compare all your options.

Loan type

Learn more Collapse

Conventional, FHA, or Special programs

Mortgage loans are organized into categories based on the size of the loan and whether they are part of a government program.

This choice affects:

  • How much you will need for a down payment
  • The total cost of your loan, including interest and mortgage insurance
  • How much you can borrow, and the house price range you can consider

Choosing the right loan type

Each loan type is designed for different situations. Sometimes, only one loan type will fit your situation. If multiple options fit your situation, try out scenarios and ask lenders to provide several quotes so you can see which type offers the best deal overall.

Conventional

Majority of loans

Typically cost less than FHA loans but can be harder to get

FHA

Low down payment

Available to those with lower credit scores

Special programs

  • VA: For veterans, servicemembers, or surviving spouses
  • USDA: For low- to middle-income borrowers in rural areas
  • Local: For low- to middle-income borrowers, first-time homebuyers, or public service employees

Loans are subject to basic government regulation. Generally, your lender must document and verify your income, employment, assets, debts, and credit history to determine whether you can afford to repay the loan. Learn more about the CFPB’s mortgage rules .

Ask lenders if the loan they are offering you meets the government’s Qualified Mortgage standard. Qualified Mortgages are those that are safest for you, the borrower.

Know the Process


Owning a Home: Loan Options > Consumer Financial Protection Bureau #pay #off #mortgage #early


#mortgage options

#

Understand loan options

Chosen by 25-30% of buyers

What to know

Your monthly payments are more likely to be stable with a fixed-rate loan, so you might prefer this option if you value certainty about your loan costs over the long term. With a fixed-rate loan, your interest rate and monthly principal and interest payment will stay the same. Your total monthly payment can still change—for example, if your property taxes, homeowner’s insurance, or mortgage insurance might go up or down.

Adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) offer less predictability but may be cheaper in the short term. You may want to consider this option if, for example, you plan to move again within the initial fixed period of an ARM. In this case, future rate adjustments may not affect you. However, if you end up staying in your house longer than expected, you may end up paying a lot more. In the later years of an ARM, your interest rate changes based on the market. and your monthly principal and interest payment could go up a lot. even double. Learn more .

Explore rates for different interest rate types and see for yourself how the initial interest rate on an ARM compares to the rate on a fixed-rate mortgage.

Understanding adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs)

Most ARMs have two periods. During the first period, your interest rate is fixed and won’t change. During the second period, your rate goes up and down regularly based on market changes. Learn more about how adjustable rates change. Most ARMs have a 30-year loan term .

Here’s how an example ARM would work:

5 / 1 Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM)

Fixed period

This “5” is the number of years your initial interest rate will stay fixed.

Common fixed periods are 3, 5, 7, and 10 years.

Adjustable period

This “1” is the how often your rate will adjust after the fixed period ends.

The most common adjustment period is “1,” meaning you will get a new rate and new payment amount every year once the fixed period ends. Other, less common adjustment periods include “3” (once every 3 years) and “5” (once every 5 years). You will be notified in advance of the change .

ARMs can have other structures. Some ARMs may adjust more frequently, and there’s not a standard way that these types of loans are described. If you’re considering a nonstandard structure, make sure to carefully read the rules and ask questions about when and how your rate and payment can adjust.

Understand the fine print. ARMs include specific rules that dictate how your mortgage works. These rules control how your rate is calculated and how much your rate and payment can adjust. Not all lenders follow the same rules, so ask questions to make sure you understand how these rules work.

ARMs marketed to people with lower credit scores tend to be riskier for the borrower. If you have a credit score in the mid-600s or below, you might be offered ARMs that contain risky features like higher rates, rates that adjust more frequently, pre-payment penalties. and loan balances that can increase. Consult with multiple lenders and get a quote for an FHA loan as well. Then, you can compare all your options.

Loan type

Learn more Collapse

Conventional, FHA, or Special programs

Mortgage loans are organized into categories based on the size of the loan and whether they are part of a government program.

This choice affects:

  • How much you will need for a down payment
  • The total cost of your loan, including interest and mortgage insurance
  • How much you can borrow, and the house price range you can consider

Choosing the right loan type

Each loan type is designed for different situations. Sometimes, only one loan type will fit your situation. If multiple options fit your situation, try out scenarios and ask lenders to provide several quotes so you can see which type offers the best deal overall.

Conventional

Majority of loans

Typically cost less than FHA loans but can be harder to get

FHA

Low down payment

Available to those with lower credit scores

Special programs

  • VA: For veterans, servicemembers, or surviving spouses
  • USDA: For low- to middle-income borrowers in rural areas
  • Local: For low- to middle-income borrowers, first-time homebuyers, or public service employees

Loans are subject to basic government regulation. Generally, your lender must document and verify your income, employment, assets, debts, and credit history to determine whether you can afford to repay the loan. Learn more about the CFPB’s mortgage rules .

Ask lenders if the loan they are offering you meets the government’s Qualified Mortgage standard. Qualified Mortgages are those that are safest for you, the borrower.

Know the Process


Tax Planning for Owning a Second Home-Kiplinger #best #mortgage #lender


#mortgage tax deduction

#

Tax Planning for Owning a Second Home

If you are in the market for a second home, congratulations! Not only can you look forward to having a place to relax, you also can garner some tax benefits for that place in the mountains or at the beach. You can use several tax breaks:

See Also: Tax Planning for Life’s Major Events

Mortgage Interest

If you use the place as a second home — rather than renting it out as a business property — interest on the mortgage is deductible just as interest on the mortgage on your first home is. You can write off 100% of the interest you pay on up to $1.1 million of debt secured by your first and second homes that was used to acquire or improve the properties. (That’s a total of $1.1 million of debt, not $1.1 million on each home.) The rules that apply if you rent the place out are discussed later.

Property taxes. You can deduct property taxes on your second home, too. In fact, unlike the mortgage interest rule, you can deduct property taxes paid on any number of homes you own.

If You Rent the Home

Lots of second-home buyers rent their property part of the year to get others to help pay the bills. Very different tax rules apply depending on the breakdown between personal and rental use. If you rent the place out for 14 or fewer days during the year, you can pocket the cash tax-free. Even if you’re charging $10,000 a week, the IRS doesn’t want to hear about it. The house is considered a personal residence, so you deduct mortgage interest and property taxes just as you do for your principal home.

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Rent for more than 14 days, though, and you must report all rental income. You also get to deduct rental expenses, and that gets complicated because you need to allocate costs between the time the property is used for personal purposes and the time it is rented.

If you and your family use a beach house for 30 days during the year and it’s rented for 120 days, 80% (120 divided by 150) of your mortgage interest and property taxes, insurance premiums, utilities and other costs would be rental expenses. The entire amount you pay a property manager would be deductible, too. And you could claim depreciation deductions based on 80% of the value of the house. If a house is worth $200,000 (not counting the value of the land) and you’re depreciating 80%, a full year’s depreciation deduction would be $5,800. You can always deduct expenses up to the level of rental income you report.

But what if costs exceed what you take in? Whether a loss can shelter other income depends on two things: how much you use the property yourself and how high your income is.

If you use the place more than 14 days, or more than 10% of the number of days it is rented — whichever is more — it is considered a personal residence and the loss can’t be deducted. (But because it is a personal residence, the interest that doesn’t count as a rental expense — 20% in our example — can be deducted as a personal expense.)

If you limit personal use to 14 days or 10%, the vacation home is considered a business and up to $25,000 in losses might be deductible each year. That’s why lots of vacation homeowners hold down leisure use and spend lots of time “maintaining” the property. Fix-up days don’t count as personal use. The tax savings from the loss (up to $7,000 a year if you’re in the 28% tax bracket) help pay for the vacation home. Unfortunately, holding down personal use means forfeiting the write-off for the portion of mortgage interest that fails to qualify as either a rental or personal-residence expense.

We say such losses might be deductible because real estate losses are considered “passive losses” by the tax law. And, passive losses are generally not deductible. But, there’s an exception that might protect you. If your adjusted gross income (AGI) is less than $100,000, up to $25,000 of such losses can be deducted each year to offset income such as your salary. (AGI is basically income before subtracting your exemptions and deductions.) As income rises between $100,000 and $150,000, however, that $25,000 allowance disappears. Passive losses you can’t deduct can be stored up and used to offset taxable profit when you ultimately sell the vacation house.

Tax-Free Profit

Although the rule that allows home owners to take up to $500,000 of profit tax-free applies only to your principal residence, there is a way to extend the break to your second home: make it your principal residence before you sell. That’s not as wacky as it might sound. Nor is it as lucrative as it used to be.

Some retirees, for example, are selling the big family home and moving full time into what had been their vacation home. Before 2009, this had a very special tax appeal. Once you live in that home for two years, up to $500,000 of profit could be tax free — including appreciation in value during the years it was your second home. (Any profit attributable to depreciation while you rented the place, though, would be taxable. Depreciation reduces your tax basis in the property and therefore increases profit dollar for dollar.)

A few years ago, though, Congress cracked down on this break for taxpayers who covert a second home to a principal residence. A portion of the gain on a subsequent sale of the home is ineligible for the home-sale exclusion of up to $500,000, even if the seller meets the two-year ownership and use tests. The portion of the profit that’s subject to tax is based on the ratio of the time after 2008 when the house was a second home or a rental unit to the total time you owned it.

This can still be a great deal if you’ve owned your second home for many years before the law changed. Let’s say you have owned a vacation home for 18 years and make it your main residence in 2014. Two years later, you sell the place. Since the five years after 2008 the place was your second home (2009 through 2013) is 25% of the 20 years you owned the home, only 20% of the gain is taxed. The rest qualifies for the exclusion of up to $500,000.

Editor’s Picks From Kiplinger


Owning a Home: Loan Options > Consumer Financial Protection Bureau #vincent #mortgage


#mortgage options

#

Understand loan options

Chosen by 25-30% of buyers

What to know

Your monthly payments are more likely to be stable with a fixed-rate loan, so you might prefer this option if you value certainty about your loan costs over the long term. With a fixed-rate loan, your interest rate and monthly principal and interest payment will stay the same. Your total monthly payment can still change—for example, if your property taxes, homeowner’s insurance, or mortgage insurance might go up or down.

Adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) offer less predictability but may be cheaper in the short term. You may want to consider this option if, for example, you plan to move again within the initial fixed period of an ARM. In this case, future rate adjustments may not affect you. However, if you end up staying in your house longer than expected, you may end up paying a lot more. In the later years of an ARM, your interest rate changes based on the market. and your monthly principal and interest payment could go up a lot. even double. Learn more .

Explore rates for different interest rate types and see for yourself how the initial interest rate on an ARM compares to the rate on a fixed-rate mortgage.

Understanding adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs)

Most ARMs have two periods. During the first period, your interest rate is fixed and won’t change. During the second period, your rate goes up and down regularly based on market changes. Learn more about how adjustable rates change. Most ARMs have a 30-year loan term .

Here’s how an example ARM would work:

5 / 1 Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM)

Fixed period

This “5” is the number of years your initial interest rate will stay fixed.

Common fixed periods are 3, 5, 7, and 10 years.

Adjustable period

This “1” is the how often your rate will adjust after the fixed period ends.

The most common adjustment period is “1,” meaning you will get a new rate and new payment amount every year once the fixed period ends. Other, less common adjustment periods include “3” (once every 3 years) and “5” (once every 5 years). You will be notified in advance of the change .

ARMs can have other structures. Some ARMs may adjust more frequently, and there’s not a standard way that these types of loans are described. If you’re considering a nonstandard structure, make sure to carefully read the rules and ask questions about when and how your rate and payment can adjust.

Understand the fine print. ARMs include specific rules that dictate how your mortgage works. These rules control how your rate is calculated and how much your rate and payment can adjust. Not all lenders follow the same rules, so ask questions to make sure you understand how these rules work.

ARMs marketed to people with lower credit scores tend to be riskier for the borrower. If you have a credit score in the mid-600s or below, you might be offered ARMs that contain risky features like higher rates, rates that adjust more frequently, pre-payment penalties. and loan balances that can increase. Consult with multiple lenders and get a quote for an FHA loan as well. Then, you can compare all your options.

Loan type

Learn more Collapse

Conventional, FHA, or Special programs

Mortgage loans are organized into categories based on the size of the loan and whether they are part of a government program.

This choice affects:

  • How much you will need for a down payment
  • The total cost of your loan, including interest and mortgage insurance
  • How much you can borrow, and the house price range you can consider

Choosing the right loan type

Each loan type is designed for different situations. Sometimes, only one loan type will fit your situation. If multiple options fit your situation, try out scenarios and ask lenders to provide several quotes so you can see which type offers the best deal overall.

Conventional

Majority of loans

Typically cost less than FHA loans but can be harder to get

FHA

Low down payment

Available to those with lower credit scores

Special programs

  • VA: For veterans, servicemembers, or surviving spouses
  • USDA: For low- to middle-income borrowers in rural areas
  • Local: For low- to middle-income borrowers, first-time homebuyers, or public service employees

Loans are subject to basic government regulation. Generally, your lender must document and verify your income, employment, assets, debts, and credit history to determine whether you can afford to repay the loan. Learn more about the CFPB’s mortgage rules .

Ask lenders if the loan they are offering you meets the government’s Qualified Mortgage standard. Qualified Mortgages are those that are safest for you, the borrower.

Know the Process


Tax Planning for Owning a Second Home-Kiplinger #sammamish #mortgage


#mortgage tax deduction

#

Tax Planning for Owning a Second Home

If you are in the market for a second home, congratulations! Not only can you look forward to having a place to relax, you also can garner some tax benefits for that place in the mountains or at the beach. You can use several tax breaks:

See Also: Tax Planning for Life’s Major Events

Mortgage Interest

If you use the place as a second home — rather than renting it out as a business property — interest on the mortgage is deductible just as interest on the mortgage on your first home is. You can write off 100% of the interest you pay on up to $1.1 million of debt secured by your first and second homes that was used to acquire or improve the properties. (That’s a total of $1.1 million of debt, not $1.1 million on each home.) The rules that apply if you rent the place out are discussed later.

Property taxes. You can deduct property taxes on your second home, too. In fact, unlike the mortgage interest rule, you can deduct property taxes paid on any number of homes you own.

If You Rent the Home

Lots of second-home buyers rent their property part of the year to get others to help pay the bills. Very different tax rules apply depending on the breakdown between personal and rental use. If you rent the place out for 14 or fewer days during the year, you can pocket the cash tax-free. Even if you’re charging $10,000 a week, the IRS doesn’t want to hear about it. The house is considered a personal residence, so you deduct mortgage interest and property taxes just as you do for your principal home.

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Rent for more than 14 days, though, and you must report all rental income. You also get to deduct rental expenses, and that gets complicated because you need to allocate costs between the time the property is used for personal purposes and the time it is rented.

If you and your family use a beach house for 30 days during the year and it’s rented for 120 days, 80% (120 divided by 150) of your mortgage interest and property taxes, insurance premiums, utilities and other costs would be rental expenses. The entire amount you pay a property manager would be deductible, too. And you could claim depreciation deductions based on 80% of the value of the house. If a house is worth $200,000 (not counting the value of the land) and you’re depreciating 80%, a full year’s depreciation deduction would be $5,800. You can always deduct expenses up to the level of rental income you report.

But what if costs exceed what you take in? Whether a loss can shelter other income depends on two things: how much you use the property yourself and how high your income is.

If you use the place more than 14 days, or more than 10% of the number of days it is rented — whichever is more — it is considered a personal residence and the loss can’t be deducted. (But because it is a personal residence, the interest that doesn’t count as a rental expense — 20% in our example — can be deducted as a personal expense.)

If you limit personal use to 14 days or 10%, the vacation home is considered a business and up to $25,000 in losses might be deductible each year. That’s why lots of vacation homeowners hold down leisure use and spend lots of time “maintaining” the property. Fix-up days don’t count as personal use. The tax savings from the loss (up to $7,000 a year if you’re in the 28% tax bracket) help pay for the vacation home. Unfortunately, holding down personal use means forfeiting the write-off for the portion of mortgage interest that fails to qualify as either a rental or personal-residence expense.

We say such losses might be deductible because real estate losses are considered “passive losses” by the tax law. And, passive losses are generally not deductible. But, there’s an exception that might protect you. If your adjusted gross income (AGI) is less than $100,000, up to $25,000 of such losses can be deducted each year to offset income such as your salary. (AGI is basically income before subtracting your exemptions and deductions.) As income rises between $100,000 and $150,000, however, that $25,000 allowance disappears. Passive losses you can’t deduct can be stored up and used to offset taxable profit when you ultimately sell the vacation house.

Tax-Free Profit

Although the rule that allows home owners to take up to $500,000 of profit tax-free applies only to your principal residence, there is a way to extend the break to your second home: make it your principal residence before you sell. That’s not as wacky as it might sound. Nor is it as lucrative as it used to be.

Some retirees, for example, are selling the big family home and moving full time into what had been their vacation home. Before 2009, this had a very special tax appeal. Once you live in that home for two years, up to $500,000 of profit could be tax free — including appreciation in value during the years it was your second home. (Any profit attributable to depreciation while you rented the place, though, would be taxable. Depreciation reduces your tax basis in the property and therefore increases profit dollar for dollar.)

A few years ago, though, Congress cracked down on this break for taxpayers who covert a second home to a principal residence. A portion of the gain on a subsequent sale of the home is ineligible for the home-sale exclusion of up to $500,000, even if the seller meets the two-year ownership and use tests. The portion of the profit that’s subject to tax is based on the ratio of the time after 2008 when the house was a second home or a rental unit to the total time you owned it.

This can still be a great deal if you’ve owned your second home for many years before the law changed. Let’s say you have owned a vacation home for 18 years and make it your main residence in 2014. Two years later, you sell the place. Since the five years after 2008 the place was your second home (2009 through 2013) is 25% of the 20 years you owned the home, only 20% of the gain is taxed. The rest qualifies for the exclusion of up to $500,000.

Editor’s Picks From Kiplinger


Tax Planning for Owning a Second Home-Kiplinger #mortgage #calculator #mortgage #calculator


#mortgage tax deduction

#

Tax Planning for Owning a Second Home

If you are in the market for a second home, congratulations! Not only can you look forward to having a place to relax, you also can garner some tax benefits for that place in the mountains or at the beach. You can use several tax breaks:

See Also: Tax Planning for Life’s Major Events

Mortgage Interest

If you use the place as a second home — rather than renting it out as a business property — interest on the mortgage is deductible just as interest on the mortgage on your first home is. You can write off 100% of the interest you pay on up to $1.1 million of debt secured by your first and second homes that was used to acquire or improve the properties. (That’s a total of $1.1 million of debt, not $1.1 million on each home.) The rules that apply if you rent the place out are discussed later.

Property taxes. You can deduct property taxes on your second home, too. In fact, unlike the mortgage interest rule, you can deduct property taxes paid on any number of homes you own.

If You Rent the Home

Lots of second-home buyers rent their property part of the year to get others to help pay the bills. Very different tax rules apply depending on the breakdown between personal and rental use. If you rent the place out for 14 or fewer days during the year, you can pocket the cash tax-free. Even if you’re charging $10,000 a week, the IRS doesn’t want to hear about it. The house is considered a personal residence, so you deduct mortgage interest and property taxes just as you do for your principal home.

Advertisement

Rent for more than 14 days, though, and you must report all rental income. You also get to deduct rental expenses, and that gets complicated because you need to allocate costs between the time the property is used for personal purposes and the time it is rented.

If you and your family use a beach house for 30 days during the year and it’s rented for 120 days, 80% (120 divided by 150) of your mortgage interest and property taxes, insurance premiums, utilities and other costs would be rental expenses. The entire amount you pay a property manager would be deductible, too. And you could claim depreciation deductions based on 80% of the value of the house. If a house is worth $200,000 (not counting the value of the land) and you’re depreciating 80%, a full year’s depreciation deduction would be $5,800. You can always deduct expenses up to the level of rental income you report.

But what if costs exceed what you take in? Whether a loss can shelter other income depends on two things: how much you use the property yourself and how high your income is.

If you use the place more than 14 days, or more than 10% of the number of days it is rented — whichever is more — it is considered a personal residence and the loss can’t be deducted. (But because it is a personal residence, the interest that doesn’t count as a rental expense — 20% in our example — can be deducted as a personal expense.)

If you limit personal use to 14 days or 10%, the vacation home is considered a business and up to $25,000 in losses might be deductible each year. That’s why lots of vacation homeowners hold down leisure use and spend lots of time “maintaining” the property. Fix-up days don’t count as personal use. The tax savings from the loss (up to $7,000 a year if you’re in the 28% tax bracket) help pay for the vacation home. Unfortunately, holding down personal use means forfeiting the write-off for the portion of mortgage interest that fails to qualify as either a rental or personal-residence expense.

We say such losses might be deductible because real estate losses are considered “passive losses” by the tax law. And, passive losses are generally not deductible. But, there’s an exception that might protect you. If your adjusted gross income (AGI) is less than $100,000, up to $25,000 of such losses can be deducted each year to offset income such as your salary. (AGI is basically income before subtracting your exemptions and deductions.) As income rises between $100,000 and $150,000, however, that $25,000 allowance disappears. Passive losses you can’t deduct can be stored up and used to offset taxable profit when you ultimately sell the vacation house.

Tax-Free Profit

Although the rule that allows home owners to take up to $500,000 of profit tax-free applies only to your principal residence, there is a way to extend the break to your second home: make it your principal residence before you sell. That’s not as wacky as it might sound. Nor is it as lucrative as it used to be.

Some retirees, for example, are selling the big family home and moving full time into what had been their vacation home. Before 2009, this had a very special tax appeal. Once you live in that home for two years, up to $500,000 of profit could be tax free — including appreciation in value during the years it was your second home. (Any profit attributable to depreciation while you rented the place, though, would be taxable. Depreciation reduces your tax basis in the property and therefore increases profit dollar for dollar.)

A few years ago, though, Congress cracked down on this break for taxpayers who covert a second home to a principal residence. A portion of the gain on a subsequent sale of the home is ineligible for the home-sale exclusion of up to $500,000, even if the seller meets the two-year ownership and use tests. The portion of the profit that’s subject to tax is based on the ratio of the time after 2008 when the house was a second home or a rental unit to the total time you owned it.

This can still be a great deal if you’ve owned your second home for many years before the law changed. Let’s say you have owned a vacation home for 18 years and make it your main residence in 2014. Two years later, you sell the place. Since the five years after 2008 the place was your second home (2009 through 2013) is 25% of the 20 years you owned the home, only 20% of the gain is taxed. The rest qualifies for the exclusion of up to $500,000.

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Owning a Home: Loan Options > Consumer Financial Protection Bureau #loan #rates #mortgage


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Understand loan options

Chosen by 25-30% of buyers

What to know

Your monthly payments are more likely to be stable with a fixed-rate loan, so you might prefer this option if you value certainty about your loan costs over the long term. With a fixed-rate loan, your interest rate and monthly principal and interest payment will stay the same. Your total monthly payment can still change—for example, if your property taxes, homeowner’s insurance, or mortgage insurance might go up or down.

Adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) offer less predictability but may be cheaper in the short term. You may want to consider this option if, for example, you plan to move again within the initial fixed period of an ARM. In this case, future rate adjustments may not affect you. However, if you end up staying in your house longer than expected, you may end up paying a lot more. In the later years of an ARM, your interest rate changes based on the market. and your monthly principal and interest payment could go up a lot. even double. Learn more .

Explore rates for different interest rate types and see for yourself how the initial interest rate on an ARM compares to the rate on a fixed-rate mortgage.

Understanding adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs)

Most ARMs have two periods. During the first period, your interest rate is fixed and won’t change. During the second period, your rate goes up and down regularly based on market changes. Learn more about how adjustable rates change. Most ARMs have a 30-year loan term .

Here’s how an example ARM would work:

5 / 1 Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM)

Fixed period

This “5” is the number of years your initial interest rate will stay fixed.

Common fixed periods are 3, 5, 7, and 10 years.

Adjustable period

This “1” is the how often your rate will adjust after the fixed period ends.

The most common adjustment period is “1,” meaning you will get a new rate and new payment amount every year once the fixed period ends. Other, less common adjustment periods include “3” (once every 3 years) and “5” (once every 5 years). You will be notified in advance of the change .

ARMs can have other structures. Some ARMs may adjust more frequently, and there’s not a standard way that these types of loans are described. If you’re considering a nonstandard structure, make sure to carefully read the rules and ask questions about when and how your rate and payment can adjust.

Understand the fine print. ARMs include specific rules that dictate how your mortgage works. These rules control how your rate is calculated and how much your rate and payment can adjust. Not all lenders follow the same rules, so ask questions to make sure you understand how these rules work.

ARMs marketed to people with lower credit scores tend to be riskier for the borrower. If you have a credit score in the mid-600s or below, you might be offered ARMs that contain risky features like higher rates, rates that adjust more frequently, pre-payment penalties. and loan balances that can increase. Consult with multiple lenders and get a quote for an FHA loan as well. Then, you can compare all your options.

Loan type

Learn more Collapse

Conventional, FHA, or Special programs

Mortgage loans are organized into categories based on the size of the loan and whether they are part of a government program.

This choice affects:

  • How much you will need for a down payment
  • The total cost of your loan, including interest and mortgage insurance
  • How much you can borrow, and the house price range you can consider

Choosing the right loan type

Each loan type is designed for different situations. Sometimes, only one loan type will fit your situation. If multiple options fit your situation, try out scenarios and ask lenders to provide several quotes so you can see which type offers the best deal overall.

Conventional

Majority of loans

Typically cost less than FHA loans but can be harder to get

FHA

Low down payment

Available to those with lower credit scores

Special programs

  • VA: For veterans, servicemembers, or surviving spouses
  • USDA: For low- to middle-income borrowers in rural areas
  • Local: For low- to middle-income borrowers, first-time homebuyers, or public service employees

Loans are subject to basic government regulation. Generally, your lender must document and verify your income, employment, assets, debts, and credit history to determine whether you can afford to repay the loan. Learn more about the CFPB’s mortgage rules .

Ask lenders if the loan they are offering you meets the government’s Qualified Mortgage standard. Qualified Mortgages are those that are safest for you, the borrower.

Know the Process