Motorbike Transport #motorcycle #transport #services, #motorcycle #transport #perth, #motorcycle #transportation, #motorcycle #transporters, #motorcycle #transport #darwin,


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Motorcycle Transport Australia Wide 1300 Bike Move

1300 Bike Move The Motorcycle Transport Service

1300-Bike-Move provides motorcycle transport and logistical solutions transporting motorcycles Australia wide.

We are Australia s leading national Motorcycle Transporter and Motorcycle Pre Purchase Inspection agency. Check out our services page to find out all about the range of services we offer from Pre-Purchase Inspections through to Secure Handover Payment.

At 1300 Bike Move we conduct fast, efficient and safe motorcycle transport for your Harley Davidson, Ducati, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, Vespa any place, anywhere and anytime, this is what we do, transport motorcycles!

We’ve done this for years so we really are the leaders in the field if you’d like a free no obligation quote on the relocation of your Motorbike then feel free to get in touch by using the online quote request form by clicking here.

We specialize in organising interstate Motorcycle Transport Services to cities such as Melbourne, Sydney, Canberra, Brisbane, Adelaide, Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast, Toowoomba, Newcastle, Coffs Harbour, Port Macquarie, Albury and we are undoubtedly the biggest mover of bikes to and from Perth and Darwin.

Motorcycle Transport Online Specials:

From time to time we run motorcycle transport monthly specials to and from Melbourne, Perth, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide and Darwin, so please either use our online quote system or call 1300 245 366 for your next Motorbike move.

For your Motorcycle Transport Service Book ONLINE Now or try 1300 245 366.

1300-Bike-Move were the proud motorcycle transporters of Motorcycling Australia s Museum bikes to the MotoGP Expo. If we are good enough to move Motorcycling Australia s museum motorcycles, then our motorcycling transportation quality of service really speaks for itself and it should be enough for you to entrust us with your motorcycle your pride and joy.

People choose to use Australia s leading motorcycle transport, bike freight company 1300-Bike-Move.

Some of our drivers have cockpit surveillance cameras in their trucks so as to always keep an eye on your motorcycle during transport via our drivers laptop, just another way of making sure your prized Motorbike is given the extra care it deserves all the way throughout transportation.

We try and give you as much notice as possible at the time of your motorcycle pickup and the time of your motorcycle drop off so that your motorcycle transport is conducted with ease and minimal downtime and you can make any arrangements you need to in advance.

Motorbike Transport do our best to keep you happy and to keep you as a customer for life, we value you and we want you to value our motorcycle transport service. We pride ourselves on the great feedback we get from our current clients and welcome all new enquiries with the same determination to exceed your expectations.

1300-Bike-Move honestly believe that we are the most professional motorcycle transport company in Australia.

Interstate Motorcycle transport and deliver from door to door in most cases, we are also known to go that extra step and deliver to areas that are out of the way, unlike other companies that have a strict 30km CBD radius.

CALL 1300 Bike Move, that s 1300-245-366 for your Motorcycle Transport Quote

Don t forget to check in on our blog from time to time, with news and updates from within the Motorbike Community.

1300-Bike-Move Motorcycle Transport organises motorcycle freight services that are safe and secure motorbike shipping to almost anywhere in Australia.

Motorcycles are usually transported in a fully enclosed vehicle to ensure the safest motorcycle transportation.

Motorcycle Transport Services include:

  • Loose uncrated motorcycles are secured and transported individually
  • Country and interstate motorcycle transport service available
  • Import motorcycle transport services provided from San Francisco to Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Perth
  • Our Motorcycle Transport crating system uses specially built Harley Davidson style motorcycle crates, only for Perth, Darwin, Northern Territory, Western Australia, Broome, Alice Springs, Karratha.
  • Pre Purchase Inspections
  • Secure Handover Payment Service

We organise Motorcycle transport to and from Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide, Darwin, Perth, Katherine, Cairns, Toowoomba, Townsville, Karratha, Broome, Alice Springs

International Motorcycle Transport

Our Worldwide International Motorcycle Transport Destinations include USA-San Francisco to Melbourne Sydney Brisbane Perth

You can trust 1300-Bike-move to organise your motorcycle transport interstate and internationally Motorcycle transport service, your one stop shop.

We are a Motorbike Transport specialist, the motorcycle transport trucks we use travel to all states of Australia Interstate Motorcycle Transport.

Motorcycle Transporters Motorcycle Transport Services 1300 Bike Move

  • Cheap Motorcycle Shipping Find Shippers to Transport Your Motorcycle
  • Motorcycle Transport and Recovery Service
  • Motorbike Transport and Motorbike Shipping

Tuesday, June 02, 2015

Horsham to host FIM World Junior Motocross Championship in 2018

Horsham to host FIM World Junior Motocross Championship in 2018 Motorcycling Australia (MA) has announced that the Horsham Motorcycle Club has won the right to host the FIM World Junior Motocross Championships (WJMX) in 2018. The 2018 FIM World Junior Motocross Championship will be held over
read more by clicking here

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Jason O Halloran gets Moto2 call up to replace injured Mike Di Meglio

26-yearold Jason O’Halloran this week has received a call-up to the Moto2 ranks to replace the injured Mike Di Meglio in the Jir Team. Now in this third season in the British Superbike Championship ranks with Samsung Honda, after first enjoying a stint with SMT Honda, the Wollongong rider has
read more by clicking here


Canada – s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move – The Globe and


#prime interest rate today

#

Canada s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move Add to.

Canada’s big banks followed the Bank of Canada’s interest rate cut, lowering their prime lending rates in a series of moves that nonetheless reinforce the reluctance of lenders to follow the central bank in lockstep.

Toronto-Dominion Bank initially decreased its prime rate – the benchmark for creditworthy borrowers – to 2.75 per cent, down 0.10 percentage points. Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Montreal, Bank of Nova Scotia and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce responded on Wednesday evening, reducing theirs by 0.15 points to 2.70 per cent from 2.85 per cent. That’s a shallower reduction than the central bank’s 0.25-point cut. TD then matched the lower prime rates with an additional cut.

ECONOMY

The Canadian dollar took a nosedive after The Bank of Canada cut its key overnight lending rate by 25 basis points to 0.50 percent saying Canada’s weakening economy is in ‘significant and complex adjustment.’ BNN Video

Economy
ECONOMY

This marks the second time this year that Bay Street has taken a more cautious approach to their lending rates after the central bank has slashed its benchmark in response to disappointing economic activity.

Overall, banks have lowered their prime rates by a total of 0.3 percentage points this year, or nearly half the Bank of Canada’s total reduction of 0.50 points over the same period.

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz appeared unconcerned by the banks’ response, noting that lending rates can be affected by many factors beyond official monetary policy.

“That’s how financial markets work,” Mr. Poloz said at a press conference. “All we’re trying to do is have an influence on [the lending rate], as opposed to determine it.”

After the Bank of Canada cut its key rate in January, also by a quarter point, the big banks were slow in responding to the surprise move.

When they did react, they took a public drubbing over their refusal to respond with an equal reduction in their prime rates, decreasing them by just 0.15 points.

However, some observers have pointed out that the Bank of Canada may not mind the muted response from the banks.

House prices have soared as borrowing costs have fallen, raising concerns that prices may be overvalued by as much as 30 per cent, according to Bank of Canada estimates. As well, Canadian indebtedness has risen to new heights, making consumers vulnerable to rising unemployment levels or an eventual ramp-up in borrowing costs.

For the banks themselves, the response to the Bank of Canada comes as they attempt to shore up profits driven by their lending activities.

Since the banks make money by lending at higher rates than their own borrowing costs, substantially lower prime rates can compress the spread, or net interest margins.

“We are in such an unusually low-interest-rate environment that the traditional rules of one-for-one [reductions in the prime rate and the Bank of Canada’s key interest rate] don’t work,” Peter Routledge, an analyst at National Bank Financial, said in an interview.

He pointed out that the net interest margin for the Canadian personal and commercial banking operations of the Big Six banks have declined to a weighted average of just 2.48 per cent from 2.73 per cent in 2010. Less than a decade ago, the margin was a far more robust 3 per cent.

Although Canadian banks have increased their overall profits over this period, their share prices have recently been struggling to keep up with the broader market, reflecting investor concerns that earnings growth is being challenged.

“We anticipate that the market’s outlook for growth will moderate further in 2016, encapsulating an even greater slowdown in loan growth and incremental margin pressures,” John Aiken, an analyst at Barclays, said in a note.

Mr. Routledge thinks the banks may also be maintaining higher prime rates, relative to the Bank of Canada’s key rate, out of concerns about credit risk.

“If the economy is slowing so much that the Bank of Canada has cut its policy rate in half” – to 0.5 per cent from 1 per cent in January – “maybe households in particular are not as creditworthy as consensus believes,” he said.

“If that’s the case, you want to put in a little more spread for taking credit risk.”

Restrictions

Thomson Reuters 2012.

All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Thomson Reuters content, including by framing or similar means, is prohibited without the prior written consent of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters is not liable for any errors or delays in Thomson Reuters content, or for any actions taken in reliance on such content. ‘Thomson Reuters’ and the Thomson Reuters logo are trademarks of Thomson Reuters and its affiliated companies.

Selected data supplied by Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters Limited. Click for Restrictions .

Copyright 2016 The Globe and Mail Inc. All Rights Reserved.

444 Front St. W. Toronto. ON Canada M5V 2S9
Phillip Crawley, Publisher

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Canada – s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move – The Globe and


#prime interest rate today

#

Canada s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move Add to.

Canada’s big banks followed the Bank of Canada’s interest rate cut, lowering their prime lending rates in a series of moves that nonetheless reinforce the reluctance of lenders to follow the central bank in lockstep.

Toronto-Dominion Bank initially decreased its prime rate – the benchmark for creditworthy borrowers – to 2.75 per cent, down 0.10 percentage points. Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Montreal, Bank of Nova Scotia and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce responded on Wednesday evening, reducing theirs by 0.15 points to 2.70 per cent from 2.85 per cent. That’s a shallower reduction than the central bank’s 0.25-point cut. TD then matched the lower prime rates with an additional cut.

ECONOMY

The Canadian dollar took a nosedive after The Bank of Canada cut its key overnight lending rate by 25 basis points to 0.50 percent saying Canada’s weakening economy is in ‘significant and complex adjustment.’ BNN Video

Economy
ECONOMY

This marks the second time this year that Bay Street has taken a more cautious approach to their lending rates after the central bank has slashed its benchmark in response to disappointing economic activity.

Overall, banks have lowered their prime rates by a total of 0.3 percentage points this year, or nearly half the Bank of Canada’s total reduction of 0.50 points over the same period.

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz appeared unconcerned by the banks’ response, noting that lending rates can be affected by many factors beyond official monetary policy.

“That’s how financial markets work,” Mr. Poloz said at a press conference. “All we’re trying to do is have an influence on [the lending rate], as opposed to determine it.”

After the Bank of Canada cut its key rate in January, also by a quarter point, the big banks were slow in responding to the surprise move.

When they did react, they took a public drubbing over their refusal to respond with an equal reduction in their prime rates, decreasing them by just 0.15 points.

However, some observers have pointed out that the Bank of Canada may not mind the muted response from the banks.

House prices have soared as borrowing costs have fallen, raising concerns that prices may be overvalued by as much as 30 per cent, according to Bank of Canada estimates. As well, Canadian indebtedness has risen to new heights, making consumers vulnerable to rising unemployment levels or an eventual ramp-up in borrowing costs.

For the banks themselves, the response to the Bank of Canada comes as they attempt to shore up profits driven by their lending activities.

Since the banks make money by lending at higher rates than their own borrowing costs, substantially lower prime rates can compress the spread, or net interest margins.

“We are in such an unusually low-interest-rate environment that the traditional rules of one-for-one [reductions in the prime rate and the Bank of Canada’s key interest rate] don’t work,” Peter Routledge, an analyst at National Bank Financial, said in an interview.

He pointed out that the net interest margin for the Canadian personal and commercial banking operations of the Big Six banks have declined to a weighted average of just 2.48 per cent from 2.73 per cent in 2010. Less than a decade ago, the margin was a far more robust 3 per cent.

Although Canadian banks have increased their overall profits over this period, their share prices have recently been struggling to keep up with the broader market, reflecting investor concerns that earnings growth is being challenged.

“We anticipate that the market’s outlook for growth will moderate further in 2016, encapsulating an even greater slowdown in loan growth and incremental margin pressures,” John Aiken, an analyst at Barclays, said in a note.

Mr. Routledge thinks the banks may also be maintaining higher prime rates, relative to the Bank of Canada’s key rate, out of concerns about credit risk.

“If the economy is slowing so much that the Bank of Canada has cut its policy rate in half” – to 0.5 per cent from 1 per cent in January – “maybe households in particular are not as creditworthy as consensus believes,” he said.

“If that’s the case, you want to put in a little more spread for taking credit risk.”

Restrictions

Thomson Reuters 2012.

All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Thomson Reuters content, including by framing or similar means, is prohibited without the prior written consent of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters is not liable for any errors or delays in Thomson Reuters content, or for any actions taken in reliance on such content. ‘Thomson Reuters’ and the Thomson Reuters logo are trademarks of Thomson Reuters and its affiliated companies.

Selected data supplied by Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters Limited. Click for Restrictions .

Copyright 2016 The Globe and Mail Inc. All Rights Reserved.

444 Front St. W. Toronto. ON Canada M5V 2S9
Phillip Crawley, Publisher

Add to Watchlist

We’ve run into a glitch. Please try again later.

We’ve run into a glitch. Please try again later.

Customize your reading font


Canada – s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move – The Globe and


#prime interest rate today

#

Canada s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move Add to.

Canada’s big banks followed the Bank of Canada’s interest rate cut, lowering their prime lending rates in a series of moves that nonetheless reinforce the reluctance of lenders to follow the central bank in lockstep.

Toronto-Dominion Bank initially decreased its prime rate – the benchmark for creditworthy borrowers – to 2.75 per cent, down 0.10 percentage points. Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Montreal, Bank of Nova Scotia and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce responded on Wednesday evening, reducing theirs by 0.15 points to 2.70 per cent from 2.85 per cent. That’s a shallower reduction than the central bank’s 0.25-point cut. TD then matched the lower prime rates with an additional cut.

ECONOMY

The Canadian dollar took a nosedive after The Bank of Canada cut its key overnight lending rate by 25 basis points to 0.50 percent saying Canada’s weakening economy is in ‘significant and complex adjustment.’ BNN Video

Economy
ECONOMY

This marks the second time this year that Bay Street has taken a more cautious approach to their lending rates after the central bank has slashed its benchmark in response to disappointing economic activity.

Overall, banks have lowered their prime rates by a total of 0.3 percentage points this year, or nearly half the Bank of Canada’s total reduction of 0.50 points over the same period.

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz appeared unconcerned by the banks’ response, noting that lending rates can be affected by many factors beyond official monetary policy.

“That’s how financial markets work,” Mr. Poloz said at a press conference. “All we’re trying to do is have an influence on [the lending rate], as opposed to determine it.”

After the Bank of Canada cut its key rate in January, also by a quarter point, the big banks were slow in responding to the surprise move.

When they did react, they took a public drubbing over their refusal to respond with an equal reduction in their prime rates, decreasing them by just 0.15 points.

However, some observers have pointed out that the Bank of Canada may not mind the muted response from the banks.

House prices have soared as borrowing costs have fallen, raising concerns that prices may be overvalued by as much as 30 per cent, according to Bank of Canada estimates. As well, Canadian indebtedness has risen to new heights, making consumers vulnerable to rising unemployment levels or an eventual ramp-up in borrowing costs.

For the banks themselves, the response to the Bank of Canada comes as they attempt to shore up profits driven by their lending activities.

Since the banks make money by lending at higher rates than their own borrowing costs, substantially lower prime rates can compress the spread, or net interest margins.

“We are in such an unusually low-interest-rate environment that the traditional rules of one-for-one [reductions in the prime rate and the Bank of Canada’s key interest rate] don’t work,” Peter Routledge, an analyst at National Bank Financial, said in an interview.

He pointed out that the net interest margin for the Canadian personal and commercial banking operations of the Big Six banks have declined to a weighted average of just 2.48 per cent from 2.73 per cent in 2010. Less than a decade ago, the margin was a far more robust 3 per cent.

Although Canadian banks have increased their overall profits over this period, their share prices have recently been struggling to keep up with the broader market, reflecting investor concerns that earnings growth is being challenged.

“We anticipate that the market’s outlook for growth will moderate further in 2016, encapsulating an even greater slowdown in loan growth and incremental margin pressures,” John Aiken, an analyst at Barclays, said in a note.

Mr. Routledge thinks the banks may also be maintaining higher prime rates, relative to the Bank of Canada’s key rate, out of concerns about credit risk.

“If the economy is slowing so much that the Bank of Canada has cut its policy rate in half” – to 0.5 per cent from 1 per cent in January – “maybe households in particular are not as creditworthy as consensus believes,” he said.

“If that’s the case, you want to put in a little more spread for taking credit risk.”

Restrictions

Thomson Reuters 2012.

All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Thomson Reuters content, including by framing or similar means, is prohibited without the prior written consent of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters is not liable for any errors or delays in Thomson Reuters content, or for any actions taken in reliance on such content. ‘Thomson Reuters’ and the Thomson Reuters logo are trademarks of Thomson Reuters and its affiliated companies.

Selected data supplied by Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters Limited. Click for Restrictions .

Copyright 2016 The Globe and Mail Inc. All Rights Reserved.

444 Front St. W. Toronto. ON Canada M5V 2S9
Phillip Crawley, Publisher

Add to Watchlist

We’ve run into a glitch. Please try again later.

We’ve run into a glitch. Please try again later.

Customize your reading font


Canada – s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move – The Globe and


#prime interest rate today

#

Canada s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move Add to.

Canada’s big banks followed the Bank of Canada’s interest rate cut, lowering their prime lending rates in a series of moves that nonetheless reinforce the reluctance of lenders to follow the central bank in lockstep.

Toronto-Dominion Bank initially decreased its prime rate – the benchmark for creditworthy borrowers – to 2.75 per cent, down 0.10 percentage points. Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Montreal, Bank of Nova Scotia and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce responded on Wednesday evening, reducing theirs by 0.15 points to 2.70 per cent from 2.85 per cent. That’s a shallower reduction than the central bank’s 0.25-point cut. TD then matched the lower prime rates with an additional cut.

ECONOMY

The Canadian dollar took a nosedive after The Bank of Canada cut its key overnight lending rate by 25 basis points to 0.50 percent saying Canada’s weakening economy is in ‘significant and complex adjustment.’ BNN Video

Economy
ECONOMY

This marks the second time this year that Bay Street has taken a more cautious approach to their lending rates after the central bank has slashed its benchmark in response to disappointing economic activity.

Overall, banks have lowered their prime rates by a total of 0.3 percentage points this year, or nearly half the Bank of Canada’s total reduction of 0.50 points over the same period.

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz appeared unconcerned by the banks’ response, noting that lending rates can be affected by many factors beyond official monetary policy.

“That’s how financial markets work,” Mr. Poloz said at a press conference. “All we’re trying to do is have an influence on [the lending rate], as opposed to determine it.”

After the Bank of Canada cut its key rate in January, also by a quarter point, the big banks were slow in responding to the surprise move.

When they did react, they took a public drubbing over their refusal to respond with an equal reduction in their prime rates, decreasing them by just 0.15 points.

However, some observers have pointed out that the Bank of Canada may not mind the muted response from the banks.

House prices have soared as borrowing costs have fallen, raising concerns that prices may be overvalued by as much as 30 per cent, according to Bank of Canada estimates. As well, Canadian indebtedness has risen to new heights, making consumers vulnerable to rising unemployment levels or an eventual ramp-up in borrowing costs.

For the banks themselves, the response to the Bank of Canada comes as they attempt to shore up profits driven by their lending activities.

Since the banks make money by lending at higher rates than their own borrowing costs, substantially lower prime rates can compress the spread, or net interest margins.

“We are in such an unusually low-interest-rate environment that the traditional rules of one-for-one [reductions in the prime rate and the Bank of Canada’s key interest rate] don’t work,” Peter Routledge, an analyst at National Bank Financial, said in an interview.

He pointed out that the net interest margin for the Canadian personal and commercial banking operations of the Big Six banks have declined to a weighted average of just 2.48 per cent from 2.73 per cent in 2010. Less than a decade ago, the margin was a far more robust 3 per cent.

Although Canadian banks have increased their overall profits over this period, their share prices have recently been struggling to keep up with the broader market, reflecting investor concerns that earnings growth is being challenged.

“We anticipate that the market’s outlook for growth will moderate further in 2016, encapsulating an even greater slowdown in loan growth and incremental margin pressures,” John Aiken, an analyst at Barclays, said in a note.

Mr. Routledge thinks the banks may also be maintaining higher prime rates, relative to the Bank of Canada’s key rate, out of concerns about credit risk.

“If the economy is slowing so much that the Bank of Canada has cut its policy rate in half” – to 0.5 per cent from 1 per cent in January – “maybe households in particular are not as creditworthy as consensus believes,” he said.

“If that’s the case, you want to put in a little more spread for taking credit risk.”

Restrictions

Thomson Reuters 2012.

All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Thomson Reuters content, including by framing or similar means, is prohibited without the prior written consent of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters is not liable for any errors or delays in Thomson Reuters content, or for any actions taken in reliance on such content. ‘Thomson Reuters’ and the Thomson Reuters logo are trademarks of Thomson Reuters and its affiliated companies.

Selected data supplied by Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters Limited. Click for Restrictions .

Copyright 2016 The Globe and Mail Inc. All Rights Reserved.

444 Front St. W. Toronto. ON Canada M5V 2S9
Phillip Crawley, Publisher

Add to Watchlist

We’ve run into a glitch. Please try again later.

We’ve run into a glitch. Please try again later.

Customize your reading font


Canada – s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move – The Globe and


#prime interest rate today

#

Canada s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move Add to.

Canada’s big banks followed the Bank of Canada’s interest rate cut, lowering their prime lending rates in a series of moves that nonetheless reinforce the reluctance of lenders to follow the central bank in lockstep.

Toronto-Dominion Bank initially decreased its prime rate – the benchmark for creditworthy borrowers – to 2.75 per cent, down 0.10 percentage points. Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Montreal, Bank of Nova Scotia and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce responded on Wednesday evening, reducing theirs by 0.15 points to 2.70 per cent from 2.85 per cent. That’s a shallower reduction than the central bank’s 0.25-point cut. TD then matched the lower prime rates with an additional cut.

ECONOMY

The Canadian dollar took a nosedive after The Bank of Canada cut its key overnight lending rate by 25 basis points to 0.50 percent saying Canada’s weakening economy is in ‘significant and complex adjustment.’ BNN Video

Economy
ECONOMY

This marks the second time this year that Bay Street has taken a more cautious approach to their lending rates after the central bank has slashed its benchmark in response to disappointing economic activity.

Overall, banks have lowered their prime rates by a total of 0.3 percentage points this year, or nearly half the Bank of Canada’s total reduction of 0.50 points over the same period.

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz appeared unconcerned by the banks’ response, noting that lending rates can be affected by many factors beyond official monetary policy.

“That’s how financial markets work,” Mr. Poloz said at a press conference. “All we’re trying to do is have an influence on [the lending rate], as opposed to determine it.”

After the Bank of Canada cut its key rate in January, also by a quarter point, the big banks were slow in responding to the surprise move.

When they did react, they took a public drubbing over their refusal to respond with an equal reduction in their prime rates, decreasing them by just 0.15 points.

However, some observers have pointed out that the Bank of Canada may not mind the muted response from the banks.

House prices have soared as borrowing costs have fallen, raising concerns that prices may be overvalued by as much as 30 per cent, according to Bank of Canada estimates. As well, Canadian indebtedness has risen to new heights, making consumers vulnerable to rising unemployment levels or an eventual ramp-up in borrowing costs.

For the banks themselves, the response to the Bank of Canada comes as they attempt to shore up profits driven by their lending activities.

Since the banks make money by lending at higher rates than their own borrowing costs, substantially lower prime rates can compress the spread, or net interest margins.

“We are in such an unusually low-interest-rate environment that the traditional rules of one-for-one [reductions in the prime rate and the Bank of Canada’s key interest rate] don’t work,” Peter Routledge, an analyst at National Bank Financial, said in an interview.

He pointed out that the net interest margin for the Canadian personal and commercial banking operations of the Big Six banks have declined to a weighted average of just 2.48 per cent from 2.73 per cent in 2010. Less than a decade ago, the margin was a far more robust 3 per cent.

Although Canadian banks have increased their overall profits over this period, their share prices have recently been struggling to keep up with the broader market, reflecting investor concerns that earnings growth is being challenged.

“We anticipate that the market’s outlook for growth will moderate further in 2016, encapsulating an even greater slowdown in loan growth and incremental margin pressures,” John Aiken, an analyst at Barclays, said in a note.

Mr. Routledge thinks the banks may also be maintaining higher prime rates, relative to the Bank of Canada’s key rate, out of concerns about credit risk.

“If the economy is slowing so much that the Bank of Canada has cut its policy rate in half” – to 0.5 per cent from 1 per cent in January – “maybe households in particular are not as creditworthy as consensus believes,” he said.

“If that’s the case, you want to put in a little more spread for taking credit risk.”

Restrictions

Thomson Reuters 2012.

All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Thomson Reuters content, including by framing or similar means, is prohibited without the prior written consent of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters is not liable for any errors or delays in Thomson Reuters content, or for any actions taken in reliance on such content. ‘Thomson Reuters’ and the Thomson Reuters logo are trademarks of Thomson Reuters and its affiliated companies.

Selected data supplied by Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters Limited. Click for Restrictions .

Copyright 2016 The Globe and Mail Inc. All Rights Reserved.

444 Front St. W. Toronto. ON Canada M5V 2S9
Phillip Crawley, Publisher

Add to Watchlist

We’ve run into a glitch. Please try again later.

We’ve run into a glitch. Please try again later.

Customize your reading font


Canada – s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move – The Globe and


#prime interest rate today

#

Canada s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move Add to.

Canada’s big banks followed the Bank of Canada’s interest rate cut, lowering their prime lending rates in a series of moves that nonetheless reinforce the reluctance of lenders to follow the central bank in lockstep.

Toronto-Dominion Bank initially decreased its prime rate – the benchmark for creditworthy borrowers – to 2.75 per cent, down 0.10 percentage points. Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Montreal, Bank of Nova Scotia and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce responded on Wednesday evening, reducing theirs by 0.15 points to 2.70 per cent from 2.85 per cent. That’s a shallower reduction than the central bank’s 0.25-point cut. TD then matched the lower prime rates with an additional cut.

ECONOMY

The Canadian dollar took a nosedive after The Bank of Canada cut its key overnight lending rate by 25 basis points to 0.50 percent saying Canada’s weakening economy is in ‘significant and complex adjustment.’ BNN Video

Economy
ECONOMY

This marks the second time this year that Bay Street has taken a more cautious approach to their lending rates after the central bank has slashed its benchmark in response to disappointing economic activity.

Overall, banks have lowered their prime rates by a total of 0.3 percentage points this year, or nearly half the Bank of Canada’s total reduction of 0.50 points over the same period.

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz appeared unconcerned by the banks’ response, noting that lending rates can be affected by many factors beyond official monetary policy.

“That’s how financial markets work,” Mr. Poloz said at a press conference. “All we’re trying to do is have an influence on [the lending rate], as opposed to determine it.”

After the Bank of Canada cut its key rate in January, also by a quarter point, the big banks were slow in responding to the surprise move.

When they did react, they took a public drubbing over their refusal to respond with an equal reduction in their prime rates, decreasing them by just 0.15 points.

However, some observers have pointed out that the Bank of Canada may not mind the muted response from the banks.

House prices have soared as borrowing costs have fallen, raising concerns that prices may be overvalued by as much as 30 per cent, according to Bank of Canada estimates. As well, Canadian indebtedness has risen to new heights, making consumers vulnerable to rising unemployment levels or an eventual ramp-up in borrowing costs.

For the banks themselves, the response to the Bank of Canada comes as they attempt to shore up profits driven by their lending activities.

Since the banks make money by lending at higher rates than their own borrowing costs, substantially lower prime rates can compress the spread, or net interest margins.

“We are in such an unusually low-interest-rate environment that the traditional rules of one-for-one [reductions in the prime rate and the Bank of Canada’s key interest rate] don’t work,” Peter Routledge, an analyst at National Bank Financial, said in an interview.

He pointed out that the net interest margin for the Canadian personal and commercial banking operations of the Big Six banks have declined to a weighted average of just 2.48 per cent from 2.73 per cent in 2010. Less than a decade ago, the margin was a far more robust 3 per cent.

Although Canadian banks have increased their overall profits over this period, their share prices have recently been struggling to keep up with the broader market, reflecting investor concerns that earnings growth is being challenged.

“We anticipate that the market’s outlook for growth will moderate further in 2016, encapsulating an even greater slowdown in loan growth and incremental margin pressures,” John Aiken, an analyst at Barclays, said in a note.

Mr. Routledge thinks the banks may also be maintaining higher prime rates, relative to the Bank of Canada’s key rate, out of concerns about credit risk.

“If the economy is slowing so much that the Bank of Canada has cut its policy rate in half” – to 0.5 per cent from 1 per cent in January – “maybe households in particular are not as creditworthy as consensus believes,” he said.

“If that’s the case, you want to put in a little more spread for taking credit risk.”

Restrictions

Thomson Reuters 2012.

All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Thomson Reuters content, including by framing or similar means, is prohibited without the prior written consent of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters is not liable for any errors or delays in Thomson Reuters content, or for any actions taken in reliance on such content. ‘Thomson Reuters’ and the Thomson Reuters logo are trademarks of Thomson Reuters and its affiliated companies.

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Canada – s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move – The Globe and


#prime interest rate today

#

Canada s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move Add to.

Canada’s big banks followed the Bank of Canada’s interest rate cut, lowering their prime lending rates in a series of moves that nonetheless reinforce the reluctance of lenders to follow the central bank in lockstep.

Toronto-Dominion Bank initially decreased its prime rate – the benchmark for creditworthy borrowers – to 2.75 per cent, down 0.10 percentage points. Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Montreal, Bank of Nova Scotia and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce responded on Wednesday evening, reducing theirs by 0.15 points to 2.70 per cent from 2.85 per cent. That’s a shallower reduction than the central bank’s 0.25-point cut. TD then matched the lower prime rates with an additional cut.

ECONOMY

The Canadian dollar took a nosedive after The Bank of Canada cut its key overnight lending rate by 25 basis points to 0.50 percent saying Canada’s weakening economy is in ‘significant and complex adjustment.’ BNN Video

Economy
ECONOMY

This marks the second time this year that Bay Street has taken a more cautious approach to their lending rates after the central bank has slashed its benchmark in response to disappointing economic activity.

Overall, banks have lowered their prime rates by a total of 0.3 percentage points this year, or nearly half the Bank of Canada’s total reduction of 0.50 points over the same period.

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz appeared unconcerned by the banks’ response, noting that lending rates can be affected by many factors beyond official monetary policy.

“That’s how financial markets work,” Mr. Poloz said at a press conference. “All we’re trying to do is have an influence on [the lending rate], as opposed to determine it.”

After the Bank of Canada cut its key rate in January, also by a quarter point, the big banks were slow in responding to the surprise move.

When they did react, they took a public drubbing over their refusal to respond with an equal reduction in their prime rates, decreasing them by just 0.15 points.

However, some observers have pointed out that the Bank of Canada may not mind the muted response from the banks.

House prices have soared as borrowing costs have fallen, raising concerns that prices may be overvalued by as much as 30 per cent, according to Bank of Canada estimates. As well, Canadian indebtedness has risen to new heights, making consumers vulnerable to rising unemployment levels or an eventual ramp-up in borrowing costs.

For the banks themselves, the response to the Bank of Canada comes as they attempt to shore up profits driven by their lending activities.

Since the banks make money by lending at higher rates than their own borrowing costs, substantially lower prime rates can compress the spread, or net interest margins.

“We are in such an unusually low-interest-rate environment that the traditional rules of one-for-one [reductions in the prime rate and the Bank of Canada’s key interest rate] don’t work,” Peter Routledge, an analyst at National Bank Financial, said in an interview.

He pointed out that the net interest margin for the Canadian personal and commercial banking operations of the Big Six banks have declined to a weighted average of just 2.48 per cent from 2.73 per cent in 2010. Less than a decade ago, the margin was a far more robust 3 per cent.

Although Canadian banks have increased their overall profits over this period, their share prices have recently been struggling to keep up with the broader market, reflecting investor concerns that earnings growth is being challenged.

“We anticipate that the market’s outlook for growth will moderate further in 2016, encapsulating an even greater slowdown in loan growth and incremental margin pressures,” John Aiken, an analyst at Barclays, said in a note.

Mr. Routledge thinks the banks may also be maintaining higher prime rates, relative to the Bank of Canada’s key rate, out of concerns about credit risk.

“If the economy is slowing so much that the Bank of Canada has cut its policy rate in half” – to 0.5 per cent from 1 per cent in January – “maybe households in particular are not as creditworthy as consensus believes,” he said.

“If that’s the case, you want to put in a little more spread for taking credit risk.”

Restrictions

Thomson Reuters 2012.

All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Thomson Reuters content, including by framing or similar means, is prohibited without the prior written consent of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters is not liable for any errors or delays in Thomson Reuters content, or for any actions taken in reliance on such content. ‘Thomson Reuters’ and the Thomson Reuters logo are trademarks of Thomson Reuters and its affiliated companies.

Selected data supplied by Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters Limited. Click for Restrictions .

Copyright 2016 The Globe and Mail Inc. All Rights Reserved.

444 Front St. W. Toronto. ON Canada M5V 2S9
Phillip Crawley, Publisher

Add to Watchlist

We’ve run into a glitch. Please try again later.

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Customize your reading font


Canada – s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move – The Globe and


#prime interest rate today

#

Canada s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move Add to.

Canada’s big banks followed the Bank of Canada’s interest rate cut, lowering their prime lending rates in a series of moves that nonetheless reinforce the reluctance of lenders to follow the central bank in lockstep.

Toronto-Dominion Bank initially decreased its prime rate – the benchmark for creditworthy borrowers – to 2.75 per cent, down 0.10 percentage points. Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Montreal, Bank of Nova Scotia and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce responded on Wednesday evening, reducing theirs by 0.15 points to 2.70 per cent from 2.85 per cent. That’s a shallower reduction than the central bank’s 0.25-point cut. TD then matched the lower prime rates with an additional cut.

ECONOMY

The Canadian dollar took a nosedive after The Bank of Canada cut its key overnight lending rate by 25 basis points to 0.50 percent saying Canada’s weakening economy is in ‘significant and complex adjustment.’ BNN Video

Economy
ECONOMY

This marks the second time this year that Bay Street has taken a more cautious approach to their lending rates after the central bank has slashed its benchmark in response to disappointing economic activity.

Overall, banks have lowered their prime rates by a total of 0.3 percentage points this year, or nearly half the Bank of Canada’s total reduction of 0.50 points over the same period.

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz appeared unconcerned by the banks’ response, noting that lending rates can be affected by many factors beyond official monetary policy.

“That’s how financial markets work,” Mr. Poloz said at a press conference. “All we’re trying to do is have an influence on [the lending rate], as opposed to determine it.”

After the Bank of Canada cut its key rate in January, also by a quarter point, the big banks were slow in responding to the surprise move.

When they did react, they took a public drubbing over their refusal to respond with an equal reduction in their prime rates, decreasing them by just 0.15 points.

However, some observers have pointed out that the Bank of Canada may not mind the muted response from the banks.

House prices have soared as borrowing costs have fallen, raising concerns that prices may be overvalued by as much as 30 per cent, according to Bank of Canada estimates. As well, Canadian indebtedness has risen to new heights, making consumers vulnerable to rising unemployment levels or an eventual ramp-up in borrowing costs.

For the banks themselves, the response to the Bank of Canada comes as they attempt to shore up profits driven by their lending activities.

Since the banks make money by lending at higher rates than their own borrowing costs, substantially lower prime rates can compress the spread, or net interest margins.

“We are in such an unusually low-interest-rate environment that the traditional rules of one-for-one [reductions in the prime rate and the Bank of Canada’s key interest rate] don’t work,” Peter Routledge, an analyst at National Bank Financial, said in an interview.

He pointed out that the net interest margin for the Canadian personal and commercial banking operations of the Big Six banks have declined to a weighted average of just 2.48 per cent from 2.73 per cent in 2010. Less than a decade ago, the margin was a far more robust 3 per cent.

Although Canadian banks have increased their overall profits over this period, their share prices have recently been struggling to keep up with the broader market, reflecting investor concerns that earnings growth is being challenged.

“We anticipate that the market’s outlook for growth will moderate further in 2016, encapsulating an even greater slowdown in loan growth and incremental margin pressures,” John Aiken, an analyst at Barclays, said in a note.

Mr. Routledge thinks the banks may also be maintaining higher prime rates, relative to the Bank of Canada’s key rate, out of concerns about credit risk.

“If the economy is slowing so much that the Bank of Canada has cut its policy rate in half” – to 0.5 per cent from 1 per cent in January – “maybe households in particular are not as creditworthy as consensus believes,” he said.

“If that’s the case, you want to put in a little more spread for taking credit risk.”

Restrictions

Thomson Reuters 2012.

All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Thomson Reuters content, including by framing or similar means, is prohibited without the prior written consent of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters is not liable for any errors or delays in Thomson Reuters content, or for any actions taken in reliance on such content. ‘Thomson Reuters’ and the Thomson Reuters logo are trademarks of Thomson Reuters and its affiliated companies.

Selected data supplied by Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters Limited. Click for Restrictions .

Copyright 2016 The Globe and Mail Inc. All Rights Reserved.

444 Front St. W. Toronto. ON Canada M5V 2S9
Phillip Crawley, Publisher

Add to Watchlist

We’ve run into a glitch. Please try again later.

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Customize your reading font


Canada – s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move – The Globe and


#prime interest rate today

#

Canada s big banks cut prime rate after BoC move Add to.

Canada’s big banks followed the Bank of Canada’s interest rate cut, lowering their prime lending rates in a series of moves that nonetheless reinforce the reluctance of lenders to follow the central bank in lockstep.

Toronto-Dominion Bank initially decreased its prime rate – the benchmark for creditworthy borrowers – to 2.75 per cent, down 0.10 percentage points. Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Montreal, Bank of Nova Scotia and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce responded on Wednesday evening, reducing theirs by 0.15 points to 2.70 per cent from 2.85 per cent. That’s a shallower reduction than the central bank’s 0.25-point cut. TD then matched the lower prime rates with an additional cut.

ECONOMY

The Canadian dollar took a nosedive after The Bank of Canada cut its key overnight lending rate by 25 basis points to 0.50 percent saying Canada’s weakening economy is in ‘significant and complex adjustment.’ BNN Video

Economy
ECONOMY

This marks the second time this year that Bay Street has taken a more cautious approach to their lending rates after the central bank has slashed its benchmark in response to disappointing economic activity.

Overall, banks have lowered their prime rates by a total of 0.3 percentage points this year, or nearly half the Bank of Canada’s total reduction of 0.50 points over the same period.

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz appeared unconcerned by the banks’ response, noting that lending rates can be affected by many factors beyond official monetary policy.

“That’s how financial markets work,” Mr. Poloz said at a press conference. “All we’re trying to do is have an influence on [the lending rate], as opposed to determine it.”

After the Bank of Canada cut its key rate in January, also by a quarter point, the big banks were slow in responding to the surprise move.

When they did react, they took a public drubbing over their refusal to respond with an equal reduction in their prime rates, decreasing them by just 0.15 points.

However, some observers have pointed out that the Bank of Canada may not mind the muted response from the banks.

House prices have soared as borrowing costs have fallen, raising concerns that prices may be overvalued by as much as 30 per cent, according to Bank of Canada estimates. As well, Canadian indebtedness has risen to new heights, making consumers vulnerable to rising unemployment levels or an eventual ramp-up in borrowing costs.

For the banks themselves, the response to the Bank of Canada comes as they attempt to shore up profits driven by their lending activities.

Since the banks make money by lending at higher rates than their own borrowing costs, substantially lower prime rates can compress the spread, or net interest margins.

“We are in such an unusually low-interest-rate environment that the traditional rules of one-for-one [reductions in the prime rate and the Bank of Canada’s key interest rate] don’t work,” Peter Routledge, an analyst at National Bank Financial, said in an interview.

He pointed out that the net interest margin for the Canadian personal and commercial banking operations of the Big Six banks have declined to a weighted average of just 2.48 per cent from 2.73 per cent in 2010. Less than a decade ago, the margin was a far more robust 3 per cent.

Although Canadian banks have increased their overall profits over this period, their share prices have recently been struggling to keep up with the broader market, reflecting investor concerns that earnings growth is being challenged.

“We anticipate that the market’s outlook for growth will moderate further in 2016, encapsulating an even greater slowdown in loan growth and incremental margin pressures,” John Aiken, an analyst at Barclays, said in a note.

Mr. Routledge thinks the banks may also be maintaining higher prime rates, relative to the Bank of Canada’s key rate, out of concerns about credit risk.

“If the economy is slowing so much that the Bank of Canada has cut its policy rate in half” – to 0.5 per cent from 1 per cent in January – “maybe households in particular are not as creditworthy as consensus believes,” he said.

“If that’s the case, you want to put in a little more spread for taking credit risk.”

Restrictions

Thomson Reuters 2012.

All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Thomson Reuters content, including by framing or similar means, is prohibited without the prior written consent of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters is not liable for any errors or delays in Thomson Reuters content, or for any actions taken in reliance on such content. ‘Thomson Reuters’ and the Thomson Reuters logo are trademarks of Thomson Reuters and its affiliated companies.

Selected data supplied by Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters Limited. Click for Restrictions .

Copyright 2016 The Globe and Mail Inc. All Rights Reserved.

444 Front St. W. Toronto. ON Canada M5V 2S9
Phillip Crawley, Publisher

Add to Watchlist

We’ve run into a glitch. Please try again later.

We’ve run into a glitch. Please try again later.

Customize your reading font