Mortgage Calculators, monthly mortgage calculator.#Monthly #mortgage #calculator


MORTGAGE CALCULATORS

Mortgage Calculators

Mortgage Payment Calculator

The application of additional loan level pricing adjustments will be determined by various loan attributes such as Loan-To-Value (LTV) ratio, credit score, transaction type, property type, product type, occupancy, and subordinate financing.

The calculator above is for educational purposes only. Your actual rate, payment, and costs could be higher.

Estimate your cost

Mortgage Payment Calculator

Estimate Your Closing Costs

The application of additional loan level pricing adjustments will be determined by various loan attributes such as Loan-To-Value (LTV) ratio, credit score, transaction type, property type, product type, occupancy, and subordinate financing. The calculator above is for educational purposes only. Your actual rate, payment, and costs could be higher. Get an official Loan Estimate before choosing a loan.

It looks like there are some unique circumstances in your financial picture. Call your PenFed representative today to discuss your options.

When you re buying a home, mortgage lenders don t look just at your income, assets, and the down payment you have. They look at all of your liabilities and obligations as well, including auto loans, credit card debt, child support, potential property taxes and insurance, and your overall credit rating. Use our home affordability calculator to determine how much of a mortgage you may be able to obtain. The calculator above is for educational purposes only. Your actual rate, payment, and costs could be higher. Get an official Loan Estimate before choosing a loan.

Start the process now

Questions or Comments?

Monthly mortgage calculator

Monthly mortgage calculator

Monthly mortgage calculator

Monthly mortgage calculator

Monthly mortgage calculator

Monthly mortgage calculator

Monthly mortgage calculator

Monthly mortgage calculator

Monthly mortgage calculator

Monthly mortgage calculator


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Payment Calculator, monthly payment calculator.#Monthly #payment #calculator


Payment Calculator

This payment calculator can determine the payment amount or payment length for a one-time, fixed-interest loan. Use the “Fixed Term” tab to calculate the monthly payment of a fixed term loan. Use the “Fixed Payment” tab to calculate the time to pay off a loan using a fixed monthly payment. Use the Take-Home-Pay Calculator to find the net payment of your salary after taxes and deductions.

Monthly payment calculator

Monthly Pay: $1,687.71

The payment calculator is used to work out what is called a “loan amortization schedule”. This is a fancy way of referring to the number and size of monthly payments you must make to pay off a loan with a fixed rate of interest an auto loan or a mortgage are good examples.

These loans fall into two categories. One can either make a fixed amount of payment every month to pay off the loan, in which case the amount of time to pay it off may be longer, or one may fix the time in which one wishes to pay off the loan, and so monthly payments will be of unequal values.

Mortgages and auto loans tend to use the time limit approach to repayment. Fixed monthly payments are often used in repayment plans, for example, in working out a plan to repay credit card debt. By making a fixed monthly payment to your credit card, instead of a minimum payment, you can pay off the debt much more quickly, and save a great deal of money in interest payments!

The Payment Calculator offers a calculation for the payment amount or payment length for a one-time, fixed-interest loan. Use the “Fixed Term” tab to calculate the monthly payment of a fixed term loan. Use the “Fixed Payment” tab to calculate the time to pay off a loan using a fixed monthly payment. You will also see a graph for the amortization it shows the accumulation of your payments over time and the decrease of your balance owed — and an Amortization Schedule, which shows each monthly payment, the interest due, and the status of the principal and the balance for a given month.


Financial Calculator, Free Online Calculators from, how to calculate monthly mortgage payment.#How #to #calculate #monthly


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How to Calculate Your Mortgage Payment, how to calculate monthly mortgage payment.#How #to #calculate #monthly


How to Calculate Your Mortgage Payment

How to calculate monthly mortgage payment

How to calculate monthly mortgage payment

Understanding your mortgage helps you make better decisions. Instead of just taking whatever you get, it pays to look at the numbers behind any loan – especially a big loan like a home loan.

To calculate a mortgage, you’ll need a few details about the loan. Then, you can do it all by hand or use free online calculators (or a spreadsheet) to crunch the numbers.

Most people only focus on the monthly payment, but there are other important details that you need to pay attention to.

We’ll start with calculating the payment, and we’ll also look at how much you pay in interest ​and how much you actually pay off – in other words, how much of your house you’ll actually own.

The Inputs

To calculate (and understand) the payments, gather the following information about a potential mortgage loan:

  • The loan amount (or principal)
  • The interest rate on the loan (not necessarily the APR, which also includes closing costs)
  • The number of years you have to repay (also known as the term)
  • The type of loan: fixed rate, interest only, etc.
  • The market value of the home
  • Your monthly income

Calculations for Different Loans

The calculation you use will depend on the type of loan you have. Most home loans are fixed-rate loans (for example, standard 30-year or 15-year mortgages).

For those loans, the formula is:

Loan Payment Amount / Discount Factor

You’ll use the following values:

  • Number of Periodic Payments (n) Payments per year times number of years
  • Periodic Interest Rate (i) Annual rate divided by number of payments per
  • Discount Factor (D) <[(1 i) ^n] - 1>/ [i(1 i)^n]

Example: assume you borrow $100,000 at 6% for 30 years to be repaid monthly. What is the monthly payment (P)?

  • D 166.7916 ( <[(1 .005)^360] - 1>/ [.005(1 .005)^360])
  • P A / D 100,000 / 166.7916 599.55

How Much Goes Towards Interest?

Your mortgage payment is important, but you’ll also want to know how much you lose to interest each month. A portion of each monthly payment is your interest cost, and the remainder goes towards paying down your loan (you might also have taxes and insurance included in your monthly payment).

An amortization table can show you – month-by-month – exactly what happens with each payment. You can create an amortization table by hand, or use a free calculator or spreadsheet to do the job for you. Take a look at how much total interest you pay over the life of your loan. With that information, you can decide if you want to save money by:

  • Borrowing less
  • Paying extra each month
  • Finding a lower interest rate
  • Choosing a shorter term loan (15 years instead of 30 years, for example)

Interest Only Loan Payment Calculation Formula

Interest-only loans are much simpler to calculate. For better or worse, you don’t actually pay down the loan with each required payment (although you can usually pay extra each month if you want).

Example: assume you borrow $100,000 at 6% interest-only with monthly payments.

What is the payment (P)?

Loan Payment Amount x (Interest Rate / 12)

Check your math with the Interest Only Calculator.

Your interest only payment is $500, and it will remain the same until:

  1. You make additional payments (which will reduce your loan balance – but your required payment might not change right away), or
  2. After a certain number of years you’re required to start making amortizing payments, or
  3. You make a balloon payment to pay off the loan entirely

Figure Out How Much you Own (Equity)

You might also want to know how much of your home you actually own. Of course, you own the home but until it’s paid off, your lender has a lien on the property so it’s not free-and-clear. The amount that’s yours – your home equity – is the home’s market value minus any outstanding loan balance.

There are several reasons you might want to calculate your equity.

Your loan to value (LTV) ratio is important because lenders look for a minimum ratio before approving loans. If you want to refinance or figure out how big your down payment needs to be, you need to know the LTV ratio.

Your net worth is based on how much of your home you actually own. Having a million dollar home doesn’t do you much good if you owe $999,999 on the property.

You can borrow against your home using second mortgages and home equity lines of credit (HELOCs). But most lenders need to see an LTV below 80% to approve a loan.

Can you Afford the Loan?

Lenders often offer you the largest loan that they’ll approve you for. This is typically based on their standards for an acceptable debt to income ratio. However, you don’t need to take the full amount – and it’s often a good idea to borrow less.

Before you apply for loans, look at your monthly budget and decide how much you’re comfortable spending on a mortgage payment. After you’ve made a decision, start talking to lenders and looking at debt to income ratios. If you do it the other way around, you might start shopping for more expensive homes (and you might even buy one – which will affect your budget and leave you vulnerable to surprises). It’s better to buy less and have some wiggle room than to suffer just to keep up with payments.


Mortgage Calculator: Calculate Your Monthly Mortgage Payment, how to calculate monthly mortgage payment.#How #to #calculate


Mortgage Calculator

  • Monthly Payment (Principal and Interest)

Mortgage calculator for your home loan

This mortgage calculator will show how much your monthly mortgage payment would be, including your amortization schedule. See how much you could save by prepaying some of the principal. Find out your home loan breakdown now by using this simple and free mortgage calculator.

NOTE: This calculator updates automatically as you move from field to field using the “tab” key. If you’re entering prepayment information, click the “calculate” button to see the final results.

A mortgage amortization calculator shows how much of your monthly mortgage payment will go toward principal and interest over the life of your loan. The loan calculator also lets you see how much you can save by prepaying some of the principal.

How to use the loan amortization calculator

With HSH.com’s home loan calculator, you enter the features of your mortgage: amount of the principal loan balance, the interest rate, the home loan term, and the month and year the loan begins.

Your initial display will show you the monthly mortgage payment, total interest paid, breakout of principal and interest, and your mortgage payoff date.

Most of your mortgage loan payment will go toward interest in the early years of the loan, with a growing amount going toward the loan principal as the years go by – until finally almost all of your payment goes toward principal at the end. For instance, in the first year of a 30-year, $250,000 mortgage with a fixed 5% interest rate, $12,416.24 of your payments goes toward interest, and only $3,688.41 goes towards your principal. To see this, click on “Payment chart” and mouse over any year.

Clicking on “Amortization schedule” reveals a display table of the total principal and interest paid in each year of the mortgage and your remaining principal balance at the end of each calendar year. Clicking the “+” sign next to a year reveals a month-by-month breakdown of your costs.

Click “calculate” to get your monthly payment amount and an amortization schedule.

The effect of prepayments

Now use the mortgage loan calculator to see how prepaying some of the principal saves money over time. The calculator allows you to enter a monthly, annual, bi-weekly or one-time amount for additional principal prepayment.To do so, click “+ Prepayment options.”

Let’s say, for example, you want to pay an extra $50 a month. Using the $250,000 example above, enter “50” in the monthly principal prepayment field, then either hit “tab” or scroll down to click “calculate.” Initial results will be displayed under “Payment details,” and you can see further details in either the “Payment chart” or “Amortization schedule” tabs.

You may also target a certain loan term or monthly payment by using our mortgage prepayment calculator. Of course you’ll want to consult with your financial advisor about whether it’s best to prepay your mortgage or put that money toward something else, such as retirement.

HSH.com has developed a host of other free mortgage calculators to help answer your other questions, such as, “Can I qualify for a mortgage,” “Will prepaying my mortgage help me save money,” “How large of a down payment do I really need,” “What s the best way to pay for my refinance,” and “When will my home no longer be underwater?” See all of HSH.com’s mortgage calculators.

This is the dollar amount of the mortgage you are borrowing. (Hitting “tab” after entering information in any field will automatically update the calculations.)

The loan’s interest rate. Along with the term, this is the key factor used by the mortgage payment calculator to determine what your monthly payment will be. To see where rates are right now, click on the “See today’s average rates” link to the right of the field, where you can also find offers from our advertising partners.

Mortgage loans come in a range of terms. Fixed rate mortgages are most often found in 30, 20, 15 and 10-year terms; Adjustable Rate Mortgages usually have total terms of 30 years, but the fixed interest rate period is much shorter than that, lasting from 1 to 10 years.

To get the most accurate calculations, use the month and year in which your very first mortgage payment was due (or will be due). If you don’t yet have a mortgage, the current month and year will work just fine.

This display shows the monthly mortgage payment, total interest paid, breakout of principal and interest, and your mortgage payoff date.

This display shows you the total principal and interest paid in each year of the mortgage and your remaining principal balance at the end of each calendar year.

While this display table also shows you the total principal and interest paid in each year of the mortgage and your remaining principal balance at the end of each calendar year, clicking the “+” sign next to a year reveals a month-by-month breakdown of your costs.

In this optional section, you can add in a regular monthly prepayment amount, re-set the calculator to show bi-weekly payments and savings, or even do a one-time prepayment to see how it affects the cost of your home loan.

How to calculate monthly mortgage payment


How To Calculate Mortgage Payments – Interest and Mortgage Formula Calculation, calculate monthly mortgage payment.#Calculate


How To Calculate Mortgage Payments

Copyright 2014 by Morris Rosenthal

All Rights Reserved

Interest and Mortgage Formula Calculation

If you loaned a bank $100,000 at a 5% interest rate, compounded annually, the bank would pay you $5,000 per year. So why can’t you get a $100,000 mortgage and pay the bank $5,500 a year, let them earn a 10% profit? The reason is that traditional mortgages are designed so you end up owning the house when the mortgage is paid off. Our simple example above would apply to an “interest only” mortgage, where you are really just renting the house from the bank. After 30 years, zero equity. It’s the reverse of your loaning $100,000 to the bank and earning $5,000 per year in interest. The bank doesn’t get to keep your $100,000, they’re just paying for the use of it. In essence, the bank is renting the principal from you, the same way you rent a house from the bank with an interest only mortgage.

The next complication in mortgage interest rate calculations is that interest is compounded. Going back to our loaning the bank money example, lets say you agreed to loan the bank $100,000 for 10 years, with the interest being compounded onto the principal annually. Using simple interest compounded annually, the situation would look like this.

So after 10 years, the principal has grown by over 50%, from $100,000 to $155,132.84. The amount of interest you are earning every year has also grown over 50%, even though the interest rate is fixed, at 5% compounded annually. In order to illustrate the effect compound interest has on mortgage payments, let’s turn the simple ten year loan into a mortgage, where you are working to pay off the principal so that you can own the house. If you were only willing to pay $5,000/year, you’d never make a dent in the principal, so it would be an interest only mortgage. But let’s say you were willing to pay $6,000/year. That comes to $500 a month, but since we’re keeping it simple and only compounding interest once a year, there’s no reason to track the monthly payments. Since the interest gets added back onto the principal at the end of every year, principal goes down very slowly. The mortgage payments would look like this:

So, after ten years you’ve paid the bank $60,000 on your $100,000 mortgage, and you still owe them $88,973.43. That’s the compound interest the bank is charging fighting against your payments, and the only way to pay less interest in the long run is to pay more per year. Lets say you were willing to pay $12,000 per year, or $1,000 per month. Would that get the mortgage paid off in ten years?

So, after ten years you’ve paid the bank $120,000 on your $100,000 mortgage, and you still owe them another $22,814.05, but at least the end is in near, and in another two years the loan will be paid off.

With mortgages, we want to find the monthly payment required to totally pay down a borrowed principal over the course a number of payments.The standard mortgage formula is:

M = P [ i(1 + i) n ] / [ (1 + i) n – 1]

Where M is the monthly payment. i = r/12. The same formula can be expressed many different way, but this one avoids using negative exponentials which confuse some calculators.

For our $100,000 mortgage at 5% compounded monthly for 15 years, we would first solve for i as

i = 0.05 / 12 = 0.004167 and n as 12 x 15 = 180 monthly payments

Next we would solve for (1 + i) n = (1.004167) 180 using the x y key on the calculator, which yields 2.11383

Now our formula reads M = P [ i(2.11383)] / [ 2.11383- 1] which simplifies to

M = P [.004167 x 2.11383] / 1.11383 or

M = $100,000 x 0.00790 = $790.81

All of the rounding down I did makes a 2 cent difference on the monthly payment, compared with keeping all the digits the calculator can handle. Now, one important feature of the mortgage formula is that it’s the principal is multiplied last, meaning that we can develop a table of mortgage rate multipliers for any fixed time period that will yield a monthly payment simply by multiplying the principal borrowed.

If you’re curious to know how much interest you’d pay the bank over the course of the mortgage,just multiply the amount of the monthly payment by the number of payments and subtract the principal:

($791.81 x 180 ) – $100,000 = $142,525.80 – $100,000 = $42,525.80

The only bright side to paying the bank all of that interest is that in most cases, it’s deductible on your Federal income tax in the in the years that it’s paid. The savings to you depends on what tax bracket you’re in. If you’re only in the 10% tax bracket to start with, you’re only getting a 10% discount on your taxes for carrying a mortgage. If you’re in the 25% tax bracket, you’re getting a 25% discount.

If you want to skip the formula and just read your monthly mortgage payment from a table, I’ve created fixed rate mortgage tables for 15 and 30 year mortgages, covering rates from 4.0% to 5.95%. Note, I use the same numbers from this page in my amortization formula example.


Mortgage Calculators, calculate monthly mortgage payment.#Calculate #monthly #mortgage #payment


MORTGAGE CALCULATORS

Mortgage Calculators

Mortgage Payment Calculator

The application of additional loan level pricing adjustments will be determined by various loan attributes such as Loan-To-Value (LTV) ratio, credit score, transaction type, property type, product type, occupancy, and subordinate financing.

The calculator above is for educational purposes only. Your actual rate, payment, and costs could be higher.

Estimate your cost

Mortgage Payment Calculator

Estimate Your Closing Costs

The application of additional loan level pricing adjustments will be determined by various loan attributes such as Loan-To-Value (LTV) ratio, credit score, transaction type, property type, product type, occupancy, and subordinate financing. The calculator above is for educational purposes only. Your actual rate, payment, and costs could be higher. Get an official Loan Estimate before choosing a loan.

It looks like there are some unique circumstances in your financial picture. Call your PenFed representative today to discuss your options.

When you re buying a home, mortgage lenders don t look just at your income, assets, and the down payment you have. They look at all of your liabilities and obligations as well, including auto loans, credit card debt, child support, potential property taxes and insurance, and your overall credit rating. Use our home affordability calculator to determine how much of a mortgage you may be able to obtain. The calculator above is for educational purposes only. Your actual rate, payment, and costs could be higher. Get an official Loan Estimate before choosing a loan.

Start the process now

Questions or Comments?

Calculate monthly mortgage payment

Calculate monthly mortgage payment

Calculate monthly mortgage payment

Calculate monthly mortgage payment

Calculate monthly mortgage payment

Calculate monthly mortgage payment

Calculate monthly mortgage payment

Calculate monthly mortgage payment

Calculate monthly mortgage payment

Calculate monthly mortgage payment


How to Calculate Your Mortgage Payment, calculate monthly mortgage payment.#Calculate #monthly #mortgage #payment


How to Calculate Your Mortgage Payment

Calculate monthly mortgage payment

Understanding your mortgage helps you make better decisions. Instead of just taking whatever you get, it pays to look at the numbers behind any loan – especially a big loan like a home loan.

To calculate a mortgage, you’ll need a few details about the loan. Then, you can do it all by hand or use free online calculators (or a spreadsheet) to crunch the numbers.

Most people only focus on the monthly payment, but there are other important details that you need to pay attention to.

We’ll start with calculating the payment, and we’ll also look at how much you pay in interest ​and how much you actually pay off – in other words, how much of your house you’ll actually own.

The Inputs

To calculate (and understand) the payments, gather the following information about a potential mortgage loan:

  • The loan amount (or principal)
  • The interest rate on the loan (not necessarily the APR, which also includes closing costs)
  • The number of years you have to repay (also known as the term)
  • The type of loan: fixed rate, interest only, etc.
  • The market value of the home
  • Your monthly income

Calculations for Different Loans

The calculation you use will depend on the type of loan you have. Most home loans are fixed-rate loans (for example, standard 30-year or 15-year mortgages).

For those loans, the formula is:

Loan Payment Amount / Discount Factor

You’ll use the following values:

Example: assume you borrow $100,000 at 6% for 30 years to be repaid monthly. What is the monthly payment (P)?

  • D 166.7916 ( <[(1 .005)^360] - 1>/ [.005(1 .005)^360])
  • P A / D 100,000 / 166.7916 599.55

How Much Goes Towards Interest?

Your mortgage payment is important, but you’ll also want to know how much you lose to interest each month. A portion of each monthly payment is your interest cost, and the remainder goes towards paying down your loan (you might also have taxes and insurance included in your monthly payment).

An amortization table can show you – month-by-month – exactly what happens with each payment. You can create an amortization table by hand, or use a free calculator or spreadsheet to do the job for you. Take a look at how much total interest you pay over the life of your loan. With that information, you can decide if you want to save money by:

  • Borrowing less
  • Paying extra each month
  • Finding a lower interest rate
  • Choosing a shorter term loan (15 years instead of 30 years, for example)

Interest Only Loan Payment Calculation Formula

Interest-only loans are much simpler to calculate. For better or worse, you don’t actually pay down the loan with each required payment (although you can usually pay extra each month if you want).

Example: assume you borrow $100,000 at 6% interest-only with monthly payments.

What is the payment (P)?

Loan Payment Amount x (Interest Rate / 12)

Check your math with the Interest Only Calculator.

Your interest only payment is $500, and it will remain the same until:

  1. You make additional payments (which will reduce your loan balance – but your required payment might not change right away), or
  2. After a certain number of years you’re required to start making amortizing payments, or
  3. You make a balloon payment to pay off the loan entirely

Figure Out How Much you Own (Equity)

You might also want to know how much of your home you actually own. Of course, you own the home but until it’s paid off, your lender has a lien on the property so it’s not free-and-clear. The amount that’s yours – your home equity – is the home’s market value minus any outstanding loan balance.

Ready to start building wealth? Sign up today to learn how to save for an early retirement, tackle your debt, and grow your net worth.

There are several reasons you might want to calculate your equity.

Your loan to value (LTV) ratio is important because lenders look for a minimum ratio before approving loans. If you want to refinance or figure out how big your down payment needs to be, you need to know the LTV ratio.

Your net worth is based on how much of your home you actually own. Having a million dollar home doesn’t do you much good if you owe $999,999 on the property.

You can borrow against your home using second mortgages and home equity lines of credit (HELOCs). But most lenders need to see an LTV below 80% to approve a loan.

Can you Afford the Loan?

Lenders often offer you the largest loan that they’ll approve you for. This is typically based on their standards for an acceptable debt to income ratio. However, you don’t need to take the full amount – and it’s often a good idea to borrow less.

Before you apply for loans, look at your monthly budget and decide how much you’re comfortable spending on a mortgage payment. After you’ve made a decision, start talking to lenders and looking at debt to income ratios. If you do it the other way around, you might start shopping for more expensive homes (and you might even buy one – which will affect your budget and leave you vulnerable to surprises). It’s better to buy less and have some wiggle room than to suffer just to keep up with payments.


4 Smart Ways to Lower Your Monthly Mortgage Payment, monthly mortgage payment.#Monthly #mortgage #payment


4 Smart Ways to Lower Your Monthly Mortgage Payment

Monthly mortgage payment

If you struggle each month to make your mortgage payment, you’re not alone. Financial challenges such as a job loss, drop in household income, or major medical bills could make paying a mortgage that was once affordable a financial burden. The Federal Reserve Board reported that in the fourth quarter of 2016, 4.15 percent of residential mortgages in the United States were delinquent. (See also: 8 Signs You’re Paying Too Much for Your Mortgage)

There is hope, though, if you are struggling to make your monthly mortgage payment. There are several steps you can take to lower the size of that payment.

Lengthen your loan’s term

The more years attached to your mortgage, the lower your monthly payment will be. With a longer term, your loan payments are stretched out over more years, making each monthly payment smaller.

Consider this example: If you take out a $200,000 15-year, fixed-rate loan with an interest rate of 3.4 percent, your monthly payment, not including your taxes and homeowners insurance, will be about $1,400 a month. Say you take out that same $200,000 mortgage loan but in the form of a 30-year, fixed-rate loan with an interest rate of 4.2 percent. Your monthly payment, again not including taxes and insurance, will be just $978.

If you are struggling to make the monthly payments on a shorter-term loan, contact your lender and ask to have your loan reamortized to one with a longer term. You won’t need to go through an official refinance to do this. But lenders will charge you a fee, one that LendingTree says averages about $250.

Just remember, when you change your mortgage to one with a longer term, you’ll pay significantly more in interest. This extra interest which could hit $100,000 or more if you take the full term to pay off your mortgage might be an acceptable cost if it helps you avoid falling behind on your mortgage payments and possibly foreclosing.

Refinance to a lower interest rate

The most common way to lower your monthly payment is to refinance your existing loan into one with a lower interest rate.

Say you originally took out a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage of $180,000 at an interest rate of 5 percent. Your monthly payment, not counting taxes or insurance, would be about $966. Now say you owe $160,000 on that loan and you refinance that amount into a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage loan with an interest rate of 4.2 percent. That payment would now fall to about $782 a month, a savings of about $184 a month.

There is one big negative that comes with refinancing: You’ll have to pay fees to do it. You can expect to pay about 1.5 percent of the amount you are refinancing in closing costs. For a loan of $180,000, that comes out to $2,700 in closing costs.

Get rid of PMI

No homeowner enjoys paying for private mortgage insurance. This insurance, better known as PMI, protects the lender if you fail to pay your mortgage. Generally, it costs from 0.5 percent to 1 percent of your loan amount each year. So on a mortgage of $200,000, PMI can cost as much $2,000 a year, or about $166 a month.

You only have to pay PMI if you came up with a down payment of less than 20 percent of your home’s purchase price when buying it. If you are paying PMI, you might be able to get rid of this expense, which would lower your monthly mortgage payment. You can request that your lender remove PMI once you have built at least 20 percent equity in your home. If you request this, your lender will send an appraiser to your home to determine its current market value. It will then calculate your equity to determine if you’ve hit that important 20 percent mark.

Reassess your property taxes

If you are like the majority of homeowners, a portion of every payment you send to your lender includes money used to pay off your property taxes. This is known as an escrow arrangement.

Under such an arrangement, your lender estimates how much money you’ll need each year to pay your property taxes. If your lender estimates that your taxes will be $6,000 this year, it will add $500 to your monthly mortgage payment. It will then deposit that $500 into an escrow account. When your taxes are due, it will dip into this account to pay them on your behalf.

You might be able to reduce your monthly mortgage payment by requesting a reassessment with your county tax assessor’s office or tax collector’s office. If your taxes are reassessed and they drop, your monthly mortgage payment will fall, too.