What does authentication mean #what #does #authentication #mean


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Penn State University Libraries

Q. Trouble Logging In and Authentication Errors: What does this error message mean?

Sample Error text:

Authentication Failure: The database that you selected is for use by the students, faculty and staff of the Pennsylvania State University only.

or your PSU Access ID and password is not accepted by a specific database.

If you are having trouble logging in to access library databases, links to Course Reserves, or full-text articles, please review the information below.

  • You are off campus and trying to access a database directly.
  • Your browser cache is conflicting with the sign on process
  • You re logged in with an incorrect credential (Friends of Penn State instead of student Access ID)
  • You are not a current PSU faculty, staff or student
  1. Make sure you are connecting to the resource via a Library page such as the Databases by Title (A-Z) list. LionSearch. or a subject guide .
  2. Try clearing your browser cache/cookies. This is usually found in the browser settings, but instructions are different for each browser. you can Google clear cache (your browser name/version) to find instructions on the web OR see http://www.wikihow.com/Clear-Your-Browser%27s-Cookies
  3. Try closing and reopening your browser OR try a different browser
  4. Try logging into another authenticated resource –like ANGEL, Canvas, LionPATH or My Library Account, and try the database link again
  5. If off campus, try downloading and installing the LIAS VPN

If you re still seeing the authentication error, then you may be logged in with your Friends of Penn State (FPS) account instead of your Access ID. This is more likely if your Access ID is numbered in the 5000 range (ABC5001, DEF5002, etc.), and if you created identical passwords for both types of account.

You can usually fix the problem by going to work.psu.edu and changing your Access password. Then, close and reopen your browser, log in with your new password and try the resource again.

If you re still having trouble after changing your Access account password, then you ll need to visit an ITS helpdesk with a signature station or call 814-865-HELP (4357). 865-HELP is available 24/7, except on holidays


What does SSO stand for? #what #does #sso #stand #for?, #what #does #sso #mean?, #sso


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What does SSO mean?

Sso The Sso was an initiation rite practiced by the Beti of Cameroon in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The participants were young men between 15 and 25 years of age who, by completing the rite, became adults and enjoyed added privileges, such as passage into the land of the ancestors at death. Each boy was sponsored by an esia Sso. The sponsor of the rite was a village headman; he was expected to provide food and lodging for guests and to pay for several large feasts during the rite’s six-month duration. Other important figures were the zum loa, who revealed past sins that the sponsor had committed and which would be expiated by the rite’s completion, and the mfek Sso, who organised and administered the rite. The Sso candidates lived away from the sponsor’s compound in a barracks called the esam Sso. The rite consisted of numerous feasts for the sponsors and elders and harrowing trials for the candidates. The boys had no instruction or supervision and relied on hunting and stealing to survive. After five months, the mfek Sso gathered the candidates around the ritual Sso tree and signalled the rite’s last stages. In the final ordeal, the boys danced around their compound, were sprayed with ants or itching powder, and crawled through a tunnel from the esam Sso to the sponsor’s compound. After one final hunt, the rite was completed and the boys obtained adult status.

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Mucus in Stool: What Does it Mean? Medical News Today #what #does #a #a #mean


#

Mucus in Stool: What Does it Mean?

Hemorrhoids: Causes, treatments, and prevention Learn all about hemorrhoids, including the symptoms and causes. We also discuss home remedies for this common condition and medical treatment. Read More

HIV and diarrhea: Causes, treatment, and remedies What is the connection between diarrhea and HIV, when might it occur, and how long does it last? Are there any complications with HIV and diarrhea? Read More

Biopsy: What you need to know In a biopsy, tissue or cells are taken from a patient for examination. There are different types of biopsy and they can help in diagnosis and treatment. Read More

Bowel Incontinence: Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention Bowel incontinence is a common complaint where a person loses some or all control over their bowels. A range of treatment is available. Read More

Article last reviewed by Tue 19 July 2016.

Visit our GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology category page for the latest news on this subject, or sign up to our newsletter to receive the latest updates on GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology.

All references are available in the References tab.

    These tabs require JavaScript to be enabled.

    Chmielewska-Wilkoń, D. Reggiardo, G. & Egan, C. G. (2014, September 14). Otilonium bromide in irritable bowel syndrome: A dose-ranging randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. World Journal of Gastroenterology. 20(34), 12283-12291. Retrieved from http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v20/i34/12283.htm.

    Fyderek, K. Strus, M. Kowalska-Duplaga, K. Gosiewski, T. Wędrychowicz, A. Jedynak-Wąsowicz, U. Heczko, P. B. (2009). Mucosal bacterial microflora and mucus layer thickness in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease. World Journal of Gastroenterology: WJG, 15(42), 5287–5294. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2776855/.

    Keister, G. (2014, July). Inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome: Similarities and differences. Retrieved from http://www.ccfa.org/assets/pdfs/ibd-and-irritable-bowel.pdf.

    Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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    Fitzgerald, Jenny. “Mucus in Stool: What Does it Mean?.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl. 19 Jul. 2016. Web.
    11 Jun. 2017. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/310101.php

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What Does Taking Out a Second Mortgage Mean? #jumbo #mortgage


#2nd mortgages

#

What Does Taking Out a Second Mortgage Mean?

A second mortgage is another lien on your home.

Taking out a second mortgage means getting another loan–in addition to your original mortgage–that uses your home as collateral. Because your house is on the line, the stakes are high if you choose to take out a second mortgage. It is important to consider the financial implications of the new loan, the types of products available and your intended use of the money.

Definition

A second mortgage allows you to access the equity in your home, which is the difference between the balance of your original mortgage and the value of your home. For instance, if your home is worth $250,000 and your mortgage balance is $200,000, you have $50,000 in home equity. When you take out any sort of mortgage, the bank files a lien against your home. This is a legal action that allows the bank to eventually take possession of your home if you default on the loan. In the case of a second mortgage, the lien is filed in “second position,” meaning that the bank holding your new loan is second in line to receive proceeds from the sale of your home if you don’t make your loan payments.

Types

Second mortgages come in two basic types: home equity loans and lines of credit. If you take out a second mortgage in the form of a loan, you will receive a lump sum of money based on the equity in your home; you will repay the money in installments over a fixed period of time. If you choose a line of credit, your second mortgage will function more like a credit card. You will have a credit limit that can be reused as you pay down the balance. The amount of money you receive from an equity loan or have access to via a line of credit will depend on how much equity is available and the lending standards of the bank. Work with your loan representative to determine how much to apply for.

Uses

You can use the cash from a second mortgage any way you wish–for example, to make home improvements, pay for tuition, buy a vehicle or finance a vacation. Understanding what you intend to use the proceeds for can help you determine the right type of second mortgage for you. If you wish to make one large purchase, a home equity loan with a fixed amount and a fixed payment may be best. If you would like continual access to the equity for day-to-day use, a line of credit is a better option.

Considerations

Taking out a second mortgage involves an additional monthly payment. Analyze your monthly expenses and obligations before applying for another loan to ensure that you will be able to handle the new payment. Also, consider the risk involved in the loan commitment, as your home is on the line in the event that you do not pay back the second mortgage. The Federal Reserve Board notes that you should also consider the costs of opening and maintaining the loan. These expenses might include home appraisal fees, closing costs and annual fees.

Alternatives

If you know you would like to take equity out of your home, but are not sure if a second mortgage is the right choice, speak to the bank about refinancing your first mortgage and getting cash back as part of the transaction. This option enables you to have only one monthly payment, and you may save money because rates on traditional mortgages are often lower than on an equity loan or line. Other alternatives to a second mortgage include an unsecured personal loan or a loan secured by a certificate of deposit.


What Does Taking Out a Second Mortgage Mean? #upside #down #mortgage


#2nd mortgages

#

What Does Taking Out a Second Mortgage Mean?

A second mortgage is another lien on your home.

Taking out a second mortgage means getting another loan–in addition to your original mortgage–that uses your home as collateral. Because your house is on the line, the stakes are high if you choose to take out a second mortgage. It is important to consider the financial implications of the new loan, the types of products available and your intended use of the money.

Definition

A second mortgage allows you to access the equity in your home, which is the difference between the balance of your original mortgage and the value of your home. For instance, if your home is worth $250,000 and your mortgage balance is $200,000, you have $50,000 in home equity. When you take out any sort of mortgage, the bank files a lien against your home. This is a legal action that allows the bank to eventually take possession of your home if you default on the loan. In the case of a second mortgage, the lien is filed in “second position,” meaning that the bank holding your new loan is second in line to receive proceeds from the sale of your home if you don’t make your loan payments.

Types

Second mortgages come in two basic types: home equity loans and lines of credit. If you take out a second mortgage in the form of a loan, you will receive a lump sum of money based on the equity in your home; you will repay the money in installments over a fixed period of time. If you choose a line of credit, your second mortgage will function more like a credit card. You will have a credit limit that can be reused as you pay down the balance. The amount of money you receive from an equity loan or have access to via a line of credit will depend on how much equity is available and the lending standards of the bank. Work with your loan representative to determine how much to apply for.

Uses

You can use the cash from a second mortgage any way you wish–for example, to make home improvements, pay for tuition, buy a vehicle or finance a vacation. Understanding what you intend to use the proceeds for can help you determine the right type of second mortgage for you. If you wish to make one large purchase, a home equity loan with a fixed amount and a fixed payment may be best. If you would like continual access to the equity for day-to-day use, a line of credit is a better option.

Considerations

Taking out a second mortgage involves an additional monthly payment. Analyze your monthly expenses and obligations before applying for another loan to ensure that you will be able to handle the new payment. Also, consider the risk involved in the loan commitment, as your home is on the line in the event that you do not pay back the second mortgage. The Federal Reserve Board notes that you should also consider the costs of opening and maintaining the loan. These expenses might include home appraisal fees, closing costs and annual fees.

Alternatives

If you know you would like to take equity out of your home, but are not sure if a second mortgage is the right choice, speak to the bank about refinancing your first mortgage and getting cash back as part of the transaction. This option enables you to have only one monthly payment, and you may save money because rates on traditional mortgages are often lower than on an equity loan or line. Other alternatives to a second mortgage include an unsecured personal loan or a loan secured by a certificate of deposit.


What Does Taking Out a Second Mortgage Mean? #reverse #mortgage #rules


#2nd mortgages

#

What Does Taking Out a Second Mortgage Mean?

A second mortgage is another lien on your home.

Taking out a second mortgage means getting another loan–in addition to your original mortgage–that uses your home as collateral. Because your house is on the line, the stakes are high if you choose to take out a second mortgage. It is important to consider the financial implications of the new loan, the types of products available and your intended use of the money.

Definition

A second mortgage allows you to access the equity in your home, which is the difference between the balance of your original mortgage and the value of your home. For instance, if your home is worth $250,000 and your mortgage balance is $200,000, you have $50,000 in home equity. When you take out any sort of mortgage, the bank files a lien against your home. This is a legal action that allows the bank to eventually take possession of your home if you default on the loan. In the case of a second mortgage, the lien is filed in “second position,” meaning that the bank holding your new loan is second in line to receive proceeds from the sale of your home if you don’t make your loan payments.

Types

Second mortgages come in two basic types: home equity loans and lines of credit. If you take out a second mortgage in the form of a loan, you will receive a lump sum of money based on the equity in your home; you will repay the money in installments over a fixed period of time. If you choose a line of credit, your second mortgage will function more like a credit card. You will have a credit limit that can be reused as you pay down the balance. The amount of money you receive from an equity loan or have access to via a line of credit will depend on how much equity is available and the lending standards of the bank. Work with your loan representative to determine how much to apply for.

Uses

You can use the cash from a second mortgage any way you wish–for example, to make home improvements, pay for tuition, buy a vehicle or finance a vacation. Understanding what you intend to use the proceeds for can help you determine the right type of second mortgage for you. If you wish to make one large purchase, a home equity loan with a fixed amount and a fixed payment may be best. If you would like continual access to the equity for day-to-day use, a line of credit is a better option.

Considerations

Taking out a second mortgage involves an additional monthly payment. Analyze your monthly expenses and obligations before applying for another loan to ensure that you will be able to handle the new payment. Also, consider the risk involved in the loan commitment, as your home is on the line in the event that you do not pay back the second mortgage. The Federal Reserve Board notes that you should also consider the costs of opening and maintaining the loan. These expenses might include home appraisal fees, closing costs and annual fees.

Alternatives

If you know you would like to take equity out of your home, but are not sure if a second mortgage is the right choice, speak to the bank about refinancing your first mortgage and getting cash back as part of the transaction. This option enables you to have only one monthly payment, and you may save money because rates on traditional mortgages are often lower than on an equity loan or line. Other alternatives to a second mortgage include an unsecured personal loan or a loan secured by a certificate of deposit.


What Does Taking Out a Second Mortgage Mean? #home #loans #calculator


#2nd mortgages

#

What Does Taking Out a Second Mortgage Mean?

A second mortgage is another lien on your home.

Taking out a second mortgage means getting another loan–in addition to your original mortgage–that uses your home as collateral. Because your house is on the line, the stakes are high if you choose to take out a second mortgage. It is important to consider the financial implications of the new loan, the types of products available and your intended use of the money.

Definition

A second mortgage allows you to access the equity in your home, which is the difference between the balance of your original mortgage and the value of your home. For instance, if your home is worth $250,000 and your mortgage balance is $200,000, you have $50,000 in home equity. When you take out any sort of mortgage, the bank files a lien against your home. This is a legal action that allows the bank to eventually take possession of your home if you default on the loan. In the case of a second mortgage, the lien is filed in “second position,” meaning that the bank holding your new loan is second in line to receive proceeds from the sale of your home if you don’t make your loan payments.

Types

Second mortgages come in two basic types: home equity loans and lines of credit. If you take out a second mortgage in the form of a loan, you will receive a lump sum of money based on the equity in your home; you will repay the money in installments over a fixed period of time. If you choose a line of credit, your second mortgage will function more like a credit card. You will have a credit limit that can be reused as you pay down the balance. The amount of money you receive from an equity loan or have access to via a line of credit will depend on how much equity is available and the lending standards of the bank. Work with your loan representative to determine how much to apply for.

Uses

You can use the cash from a second mortgage any way you wish–for example, to make home improvements, pay for tuition, buy a vehicle or finance a vacation. Understanding what you intend to use the proceeds for can help you determine the right type of second mortgage for you. If you wish to make one large purchase, a home equity loan with a fixed amount and a fixed payment may be best. If you would like continual access to the equity for day-to-day use, a line of credit is a better option.

Considerations

Taking out a second mortgage involves an additional monthly payment. Analyze your monthly expenses and obligations before applying for another loan to ensure that you will be able to handle the new payment. Also, consider the risk involved in the loan commitment, as your home is on the line in the event that you do not pay back the second mortgage. The Federal Reserve Board notes that you should also consider the costs of opening and maintaining the loan. These expenses might include home appraisal fees, closing costs and annual fees.

Alternatives

If you know you would like to take equity out of your home, but are not sure if a second mortgage is the right choice, speak to the bank about refinancing your first mortgage and getting cash back as part of the transaction. This option enables you to have only one monthly payment, and you may save money because rates on traditional mortgages are often lower than on an equity loan or line. Other alternatives to a second mortgage include an unsecured personal loan or a loan secured by a certificate of deposit.


What Does Taking Out a Second Mortgage Mean? #mortgage #rates #trend


#2nd mortgages

#

What Does Taking Out a Second Mortgage Mean?

A second mortgage is another lien on your home.

Taking out a second mortgage means getting another loan–in addition to your original mortgage–that uses your home as collateral. Because your house is on the line, the stakes are high if you choose to take out a second mortgage. It is important to consider the financial implications of the new loan, the types of products available and your intended use of the money.

Definition

A second mortgage allows you to access the equity in your home, which is the difference between the balance of your original mortgage and the value of your home. For instance, if your home is worth $250,000 and your mortgage balance is $200,000, you have $50,000 in home equity. When you take out any sort of mortgage, the bank files a lien against your home. This is a legal action that allows the bank to eventually take possession of your home if you default on the loan. In the case of a second mortgage, the lien is filed in “second position,” meaning that the bank holding your new loan is second in line to receive proceeds from the sale of your home if you don’t make your loan payments.

Types

Second mortgages come in two basic types: home equity loans and lines of credit. If you take out a second mortgage in the form of a loan, you will receive a lump sum of money based on the equity in your home; you will repay the money in installments over a fixed period of time. If you choose a line of credit, your second mortgage will function more like a credit card. You will have a credit limit that can be reused as you pay down the balance. The amount of money you receive from an equity loan or have access to via a line of credit will depend on how much equity is available and the lending standards of the bank. Work with your loan representative to determine how much to apply for.

Uses

You can use the cash from a second mortgage any way you wish–for example, to make home improvements, pay for tuition, buy a vehicle or finance a vacation. Understanding what you intend to use the proceeds for can help you determine the right type of second mortgage for you. If you wish to make one large purchase, a home equity loan with a fixed amount and a fixed payment may be best. If you would like continual access to the equity for day-to-day use, a line of credit is a better option.

Considerations

Taking out a second mortgage involves an additional monthly payment. Analyze your monthly expenses and obligations before applying for another loan to ensure that you will be able to handle the new payment. Also, consider the risk involved in the loan commitment, as your home is on the line in the event that you do not pay back the second mortgage. The Federal Reserve Board notes that you should also consider the costs of opening and maintaining the loan. These expenses might include home appraisal fees, closing costs and annual fees.

Alternatives

If you know you would like to take equity out of your home, but are not sure if a second mortgage is the right choice, speak to the bank about refinancing your first mortgage and getting cash back as part of the transaction. This option enables you to have only one monthly payment, and you may save money because rates on traditional mortgages are often lower than on an equity loan or line. Other alternatives to a second mortgage include an unsecured personal loan or a loan secured by a certificate of deposit.


What Does Taking Out a Second Mortgage Mean? #investment #mortgage #rates


#2nd mortgages

#

What Does Taking Out a Second Mortgage Mean?

A second mortgage is another lien on your home.

Taking out a second mortgage means getting another loan–in addition to your original mortgage–that uses your home as collateral. Because your house is on the line, the stakes are high if you choose to take out a second mortgage. It is important to consider the financial implications of the new loan, the types of products available and your intended use of the money.

Definition

A second mortgage allows you to access the equity in your home, which is the difference between the balance of your original mortgage and the value of your home. For instance, if your home is worth $250,000 and your mortgage balance is $200,000, you have $50,000 in home equity. When you take out any sort of mortgage, the bank files a lien against your home. This is a legal action that allows the bank to eventually take possession of your home if you default on the loan. In the case of a second mortgage, the lien is filed in “second position,” meaning that the bank holding your new loan is second in line to receive proceeds from the sale of your home if you don’t make your loan payments.

Types

Second mortgages come in two basic types: home equity loans and lines of credit. If you take out a second mortgage in the form of a loan, you will receive a lump sum of money based on the equity in your home; you will repay the money in installments over a fixed period of time. If you choose a line of credit, your second mortgage will function more like a credit card. You will have a credit limit that can be reused as you pay down the balance. The amount of money you receive from an equity loan or have access to via a line of credit will depend on how much equity is available and the lending standards of the bank. Work with your loan representative to determine how much to apply for.

Uses

You can use the cash from a second mortgage any way you wish–for example, to make home improvements, pay for tuition, buy a vehicle or finance a vacation. Understanding what you intend to use the proceeds for can help you determine the right type of second mortgage for you. If you wish to make one large purchase, a home equity loan with a fixed amount and a fixed payment may be best. If you would like continual access to the equity for day-to-day use, a line of credit is a better option.

Considerations

Taking out a second mortgage involves an additional monthly payment. Analyze your monthly expenses and obligations before applying for another loan to ensure that you will be able to handle the new payment. Also, consider the risk involved in the loan commitment, as your home is on the line in the event that you do not pay back the second mortgage. The Federal Reserve Board notes that you should also consider the costs of opening and maintaining the loan. These expenses might include home appraisal fees, closing costs and annual fees.

Alternatives

If you know you would like to take equity out of your home, but are not sure if a second mortgage is the right choice, speak to the bank about refinancing your first mortgage and getting cash back as part of the transaction. This option enables you to have only one monthly payment, and you may save money because rates on traditional mortgages are often lower than on an equity loan or line. Other alternatives to a second mortgage include an unsecured personal loan or a loan secured by a certificate of deposit.