C d plumbing #plumbing, #online #dictionary, #english #dictionary, #plumbing #definition, #define #plumbing, #definition #of #plumbing,


#

plumbing

plumb

Examples from the News

  • They found the building was a shell, with no apparently electricity or plumbing, and no completed inner construction.

Nobody’s Home at the Hermit Kingdom’s Ghost Hotel

  • Pliny the Elder considered their plumbing to be the greatest accomplishment of the Roman Empire.
    The Scariest Thing About Sandy: Guarding the Water Supply
  • Hotel maintenance is a never-ending job, and plumbing can be very expensive to fix.
    Gordon Ramsay: 7 Hotel Horrors!
  • Even once the plumbing was installed, some jugs of hot water were still taken up.
    The Real Downton Abbey: Juiciest Bits From The Lost Legacy of Highclere Castle
  • Well, if you hire a cheap plumber, don t be surprised when the plumbing breaks.

    America s New Mercenaries

  • Examples

    • There seems to be a leak in the plumbing somewhere on this floor, the man went on.

    The Film of Fear

  • You may look over the plumbing in the bathroom whenever you are ready.
    The Film of Fear
  • Constructions involved in the house, other than the plumbing fixtures.
    Rural Hygiene
  • Leadership has improved its table manners, its plumbing, and its God.
    Erik Dorn
  • And you know that it needs everything from plumbing to linen.

  • What is Software? Webopedia Definition #software, #application, #program, #business #tools, #enterprise #application, #productivity, #computing, #define,


    #

    software

    Software means computer instructions or data . Anything that can be stored electronically is software, in contrast to storage devices and display devices which are called hardware .

    The Difference Between Software and Hardware

    The terms software and hardware are used as both nouns and adjectives. For example, you can say: “The problem lies in the software,” meaning that there is a problem with the program or data, not with the computer itself. You can also say: “It is a software problem.”

    The distinction between software and hardware is sometimes confusing because they are so integrally linked. Clearly, when you purchase a program, you are buying software. But to buy the software, you need to buy the disk (hardware) on which the software is recorded.

    Categories of Computer Software

    Software is often divided into two categories. Systems software includes the operating system and all the utilities that enable the computer to function. Applications software includes programs that do real work for users. For example, word processors. spreadsheets. and database management systems fall under the category of applications software.

    Top 5 Software Related Questions

    NEXT
    Software Configuration Management

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    Trident asset management #asset, # #bersetzung, #englisch-deutsch, #w #rterbuch, #onlinew #rterbuch, #translation, #dictionary, #online-w #rterbuch,


    #

    asset in anderen Sprachen:

    W rterbuch Englisch Deutsch: asset

    bersetzung 1 – 50 von 204

    A2016-12-14: +Deniable Asset+ as an RPG / a rol.
    F2016-12-13: deniable asset
    A2016-02-07: “Asset” in CIA parlance.
    A2016-02-07: Ein “asset” ist ein Spion/Agent
    F2016-02-07: National asset
    A2015-04-23: degree of asset depreciation
    F2015-02-04: a chemotherapy “asset”
    A2015-01-05: accounting. asset management??
    F2014-11-25: Asset specificity
    A2014-09-28: Anlagenbuchhaltung / Asset Accounting
    F2014-09-28: Anlagenbuchhaltung / Asset Accounting
    A2014-07-01: retiring an asset is an accounting term
    F2013-08-21: It was an asset that wouldn’t be sold
    A2013-01-07: asset invoices ?
    A2012-11-11: Asset
    F2012-11-11: Finanzen – wie ist hier bloß das k.
    A2012-06-10: How about “asset”?
    A2012-04-28: “asset situations” is contrasted w.
    A2012-04-23: asset
    F2012-04-20: Finanztext – was sind eigentlich “.

    Im Forum nach asset suchen
    Im Forum nach asset fragen

    Kennst du bersetzungen, die noch nicht in diesem W rterbuch enthalten sind? Hier kannst du sie vorschlagen!
    Bitte immer nur genau eine Deutsch-Englisch- bersetzung eintragen (Formatierung siehe Guidelines ), m glichst mit einem guten Beleg im Kommentarfeld. Wichtig: Bitte hilf auch bei der Pr fung anderer bersetzung svorschl ge mit!

    Dieses Deutsch-Englisch-W rterbuch basiert auf der Idee der freien Weitergabe von Wissen. Mehr Informationen!
    Enth lt bersetzungen von der TU Chemnitz sowie aus Mr Honey’s Business Dictionary (Englisch/Deutsch). Vielen Dank daf r!
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    Accounting English #english-learning, #learn #english, #english #courses, #english #course, #online, #audio, #dialogues, #english #pronunciation, #dictionary,


    #

    Accounting English

    Resource type: Narration, with audio
    Level: Intermediate

    Accounting English / Assets
    Narration: Part Two

    Resource type: Narration, with audio
    Level: Intermediate

    Accounting English / Assets
    Narration: Part Three

    Resource type: Narration, with audio
    Level: Intermediate

    Accounting English / Assets
    Pronunciation Practice

    Resource type: Pronunciation practice, with audio
    Level: Beginner

    Accounting English / Assets
    Online Test

    Resource type: Online test, with audio
    Level: Intermediate

    Accounting English / Depreciation
    Narration: Part One

    Resource type: Narration, with audio
    Level: Intermediate

    Accounting English / Depreciation
    Narration: Part Two

    Resource type: Narration, with audio
    Level: Intermediate

    Accounting English / Depreciation
    Narration: Part Three

    Resource type: Narration, with audio
    Level: Intermediate

    Accounting English / Depreciation
    Narration: Part Four

    Resource type: Narration, with audio
    Level: Intermediate

    Accounting English / Depreciation
    Pronunciation Practice

    Resource type: Pronunciation practice, with audio
    Level: Beginner

    Accounting English / Depreciation
    Online Test

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    Accounting English / The Annual Report
    Narration: Part One

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    What is Cloud Computing? Webopedia Definition #cloud #computing, #cloud, #service, #provider, #cloud #explained, #the #cloud,


    #

    cloud computing

    Related Terms

    Cloud computing is a type of computing that relies on sharing computing resources rather than having local servers or personal devices to handle applications .

    In cloud computing, the word cloud (also phrased as “the cloud”) is used as a metaphor for “the Internet ,” so the phrase cloud computing means “a type of Internet-based computing,” where different services such as servers, storage and applications are delivered to an organization’s computers and devices through the Internet.

    A Simple Description

    In its most simple description, cloud computing is taking services (“cloud services”) and moving them outside an organizations firewall on shared systems. Applications and services are accessed via the Web, instead of your hard drive. The services are delivered and used over the Internet and are paid for by cloud customer (your business), typically on an “as-needed, pay-per-use” business model. The cloud infrastructure is maintained by the cloud provider, not the individual cloud customer.

    Cloud computing is comparable to grid computing. a type of computing where unused processing cycles of all computers in a network are harnesses to solve problems too intensive for any stand-alone machine.

    How it Works

    Cloud computing applies traditional supercomputing. or high-performance computing power, normally used by military and research facilities, to perform tens of trillions of computations per second. In consumer-oriented applications such as financial portfolios, to deliver personalized information, to provide data storage or to power large, immersive online computer games.

    To do this, cloud computing uses networks of large groups of servers typically running low-cost consumer PC technology with specialized connections to spread data-processing chores across them. This shared IT infrastructure contains large pools of systems that are linked together. Often, virtualization techniques are used to maximize the power of cloud computing.

    Cloud Computing Standards

    The standards for connecting the computer systems and the software needed to make cloud computing work are not fully defined at present time, leaving many companies to define their own cloud computing technologies. Organizations choose cloud providers that satisfy their needs. Cloud computing systems offered by companies, like IBM ‘s “Blue Cloud” technologies, for example, are based on open standards and open source software which link together computers that are used to to deliver Web 2.0 capabilities like mash-ups or mobile commerce .

    Organizations such as the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Open Cloud Consortium (OCC) and Open Grid Forum (OGF) are a few of the many organizations that have suggested some type of standard or suggested guidelines.

    In the Data Center and for Small Business

    Cloud computing has started to obtain mass appeal in corporate data centers as it enables the data center to operate like the Internet through the process of enabling computing resources to be accessed and shared as virtual resources in a secure and scalable manner.

    For a small and medium size business (SMB ), the benefits of cloud computing is currently driving adoption. In the SMB sector there is often a lack of time and financial resources to purchase, deploy and maintain an infrastructure (e.g. the software, server and storage).

    In cloud computing, small businesses can access these resources and expand or shrink services as business needs change. The common pay-as-you-go subscription model is designed to let SMBs easily add or remove services and you typically will only pay for what you do use.

    Common Cloud Service Models

    Cloud services are typically deployed based on the end-user (business) requirements. The primary services include the following:

    A software delivery method that provides access to software and its functions remotely as a Web-based service. Software as a Service allows organizations to access business functionality at a cost typically less than paying for licensed applications since SaaS pricing is based on a monthly fee.

    A computing platform being delivered as a service. Here the platform is outsourced in place of a company or data center purchasing and managing their own hardware and software layers.

    A computer infrastructure, such as virtualization, being delivered as a service. IaaS is popular in the data center where software and servers are purchased as a fully outsourced service and usually billed on usage and how much of the resource is used

    Top 5 Cloud Computing Definitions

    More Cloud Computing Articles

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    What is Domain Name? Webopedia Definition #domain #name, #ip #address, #url, #web #page, #top #level


    #

    domain name

    Related Terms

    Domain names are used to identify one or more IP addresses . For example, the domain name microsoft.com represents about a dozen IP addresses. Domain names are used in URLs to identify particular Web pages. For example, in the URL http://www.pcwebopedia.com/index.html, the domain name is pcwebopedia.com.

    Every domain name has a suffix that indicates which top level domain (TLD) it belongs to. There are only a limited number of such domains. For example:

    Because the Internet is based on IP addresses, not domain names, every Web server requires a Domain Name System (DNS) server to translate domain names into IP addresses.

    Related Webopedia Articles

    PREVIOUS
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    It degree #degree, # #bersetzung, #englisch-deutsch, #w #rterbuch, #onlinew #rterbuch, #translation, #dictionary, #online-w #rterbuch, #deutschw


    #

    degree in anderen Sprachen:

    W rterbuch Englisch Deutsch: degree

    bersetzung 1 – 50 von 403

    F2017-06-02: degree?
    A2017-05-05: should be “equivalent” university.
    A2017-05-03: equivalency university degree
    F2017-05-02: equivalency university degree
    F2017-02-13: Ranking of languages according to.
    F2017-01-04: degree of energy
    F2017-01-04: To the degree one is organized in.
    A2015-11-04: One possibility: as part of my/our.
    A2015-05-17: that agrees with the focus area of.
    A2015-04-23: degree of asset depreciation
    A2015-02-11: court of first degree
    F2015-02-11: court of first degree
    A2014-10-29: Woman – inaccessible phenomenon in.
    A2014-06-23: degree, certificate
    A2014-05-23: Master’s degree
    A2014-05-05: In the UK, only the exams at the e.
    A2014-03-14: Yes, one degree kelvin is the same.
    F2014-03-13: Degree symbol ° in english text
    A2014-01-07: If older Austrian, degree of depri.
    F2013-12-14: upper second-class degree

    Im Forum nach degree suchen
    Im Forum nach degree fragen

    Kennst du bersetzungen, die noch nicht in diesem W rterbuch enthalten sind? Hier kannst du sie vorschlagen!
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    Dieses Deutsch-Englisch-W rterbuch basiert auf der Idee der freien Weitergabe von Wissen. Mehr Informationen!
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    Mortgage – definition of mortgage by The Free Dictionary #boat #mortgage #calculator


    #mortgage online

    #

    mortgage

    1. A loan for the purchase of real property, secured by a lien on the property.

    2. The document specifying the terms and conditions of the repayment of such a loan.

    3. The repayment obligation associated with such a loan: a family who cannot afford their mortgage.

    4. The right to payment associated with such a loan: a bank that buys mortgages from originators.

    5. The lien on the property associated with such a loan.

    1. To pledge (real property) as the security for a loan.

    2. To make subject to a claim or risk; pledge against a doubtful outcome: mortgaged their political careers by taking an unpopular stand.

    [Middle English morgage. from Old French. mort. dead (from Vulgar Latin *mortus. from Latin mortuus. past participle of mor . to die ; see mer- in Indo-European roots ) + gage. pledge (of Germanic origin ).]

    Word History: In early Anglo-Norman law, property pledged as security for a loan was normally held by the creditor until the debt was repaid. Under this arrangement, the profits or benefits that accrued to the holder of the property could either be applied to the discharge of the principal or taken by the creditor as a form of interest. In his Tractatus de legibus et consuetudinibus regni Angliae (1189), Ranulf de Glanville explains that this latter type of pledge, in which the fruits of the property were taken by the creditor without reduction in the debt, was known by the term mort gage, which in Old French means “dead pledge.” Because of Christian prohibitions on profiting from money lending, however, the mortgage was considered a species of usury. The preferred type of pledge, in which the property’s profits went to paying off the debt and thus continued to benefit the borrower, was known in Old French by the term vif gage, “living pledge.” By the time of the great English jurist Thomas Littleton’s Treatise on Tenures (1481), however, the mortgage had evolved into its modern form a conditional pledge in which the property (and its profits) remain in possession of the debtor during the loan’s repayment. This led Littleton and his followers, such as the influential jurist Sir Edward Coke (1552-1634), to explain the mort in mortgage in terms of the permanent loss of the property in the event the borrower fails to repay, rather than of the loss of the profits from the property over the duration of the loan.

    mortgage

    1. (Banking Finance) an agreement under which a person borrows money to buy property, esp a house, and the lender may take possession of the property if the borrower fails to repay the money

    2. (Banking Finance) the deed effecting such an agreement

    3. (Banking Finance) the loan obtained under such an agreement: a mortgage of £148 000.

    4. (Banking Finance) a regular payment of money borrowed under such an agreement: a mortgage of £447 per month.

    (Banking Finance) to pledge (a house or other property) as security for the repayment of a loan

    (Banking Finance) of or relating to a mortgage: a mortgage payment.

    [C14: from Old French, literally: dead pledge, from mort dead + gage security, gage 1 ]

    mort gage

    1. a conveyance of an interest in property as security for the repayment of money borrowed.

    2. the deed by which such a transaction is effected.

    3. the rights conferred by it, or the state of the property conveyed.

    4. to convey or place (property) under a mortgage.

    5. to place under advance obligation; pledge.

    [1350 1400; Middle English Old French mortgage =mort dead ( Latin mortuus ) + gage gage 1 ]

    mortgage

    1. the giving of property, usually real property, as security to a creditor for payment of a debt.
    2. the deed pledging the security.

    mortgage

    Past participle: mortgaged
    Gerund: mortgaging

    Shimerda: he was unable to meet a note which fell due on the first of November; had to pay an exorbitant bonus on renewing it, and to give a mortgage on his pigs and horses and even his milk cow.

    Haley has come into possession of a mortgage. which, if I don’t clear off with him directly, will take everything before it.

    We build our churches almost without regard to cost; we rear an edifice which is an adornment to the town, and we gild it, and fresco it, and mortgage it, and do everything we can think of to perfect it, and then spoil it all by putting a bell on it which afflicts everybody who hears it, giving some the headache, others St.

    But it’s finished, that’s one comfort, and we’ll have a lovely time when we’re all grown up and the mortgage is paid off.

    To the eye it is fair enough, here; but seen in its integrity, under the sky, and by the daylight, it is a crumbling tower of waste, mismanagement, extortion, debt, mortgage. oppression, hunger, nakedness, and suffering.

    But these shares do not represent wealth actually in existence; they are a mortgage on the labor of unborn generations of laborers, who must work to keep me and mine in idleness and luxury.

    To save the boy, I had to sell my lands and mortgage my ancestral castle; and this not being enough, in the end I have had to borrow money, at a ruinous interest, from my lord of Hereford.

    We make in our case a deposit, on a mortgage. which is an advance, as you see, since we gain at least ten, fifteen, twenty, or a hundred livres’ worth of iron in exchange for our money.

    I have heard my grandfather say that old Peter gave his father a mortgage of this very house and land, to raise cash for his silly project.

    Ay, at seven per cent a month with a mortgage on the unborn calf,’ said a young Dogra, soldier going south on leave; and they all laughed.

    He had condescended to mortgage as far as he had the power, but he would never condescend to sell.

    By giving a chattel mortgage on their growing wheat, they borrowed enough, at twenty per cent, to buy seed corn and a plow.


    Mortgage – definition of mortgage by The Free Dictionary #freedmont #mortgage


    #mortgage online

    #

    mortgage

    1. A loan for the purchase of real property, secured by a lien on the property.

    2. The document specifying the terms and conditions of the repayment of such a loan.

    3. The repayment obligation associated with such a loan: a family who cannot afford their mortgage.

    4. The right to payment associated with such a loan: a bank that buys mortgages from originators.

    5. The lien on the property associated with such a loan.

    1. To pledge (real property) as the security for a loan.

    2. To make subject to a claim or risk; pledge against a doubtful outcome: mortgaged their political careers by taking an unpopular stand.

    [Middle English morgage. from Old French. mort. dead (from Vulgar Latin *mortus. from Latin mortuus. past participle of mor . to die ; see mer- in Indo-European roots ) + gage. pledge (of Germanic origin ).]

    Word History: In early Anglo-Norman law, property pledged as security for a loan was normally held by the creditor until the debt was repaid. Under this arrangement, the profits or benefits that accrued to the holder of the property could either be applied to the discharge of the principal or taken by the creditor as a form of interest. In his Tractatus de legibus et consuetudinibus regni Angliae (1189), Ranulf de Glanville explains that this latter type of pledge, in which the fruits of the property were taken by the creditor without reduction in the debt, was known by the term mort gage, which in Old French means “dead pledge.” Because of Christian prohibitions on profiting from money lending, however, the mortgage was considered a species of usury. The preferred type of pledge, in which the property’s profits went to paying off the debt and thus continued to benefit the borrower, was known in Old French by the term vif gage, “living pledge.” By the time of the great English jurist Thomas Littleton’s Treatise on Tenures (1481), however, the mortgage had evolved into its modern form a conditional pledge in which the property (and its profits) remain in possession of the debtor during the loan’s repayment. This led Littleton and his followers, such as the influential jurist Sir Edward Coke (1552-1634), to explain the mort in mortgage in terms of the permanent loss of the property in the event the borrower fails to repay, rather than of the loss of the profits from the property over the duration of the loan.

    mortgage

    1. (Banking Finance) an agreement under which a person borrows money to buy property, esp a house, and the lender may take possession of the property if the borrower fails to repay the money

    2. (Banking Finance) the deed effecting such an agreement

    3. (Banking Finance) the loan obtained under such an agreement: a mortgage of £148 000.

    4. (Banking Finance) a regular payment of money borrowed under such an agreement: a mortgage of £447 per month.

    (Banking Finance) to pledge (a house or other property) as security for the repayment of a loan

    (Banking Finance) of or relating to a mortgage: a mortgage payment.

    [C14: from Old French, literally: dead pledge, from mort dead + gage security, gage 1 ]

    mort gage

    1. a conveyance of an interest in property as security for the repayment of money borrowed.

    2. the deed by which such a transaction is effected.

    3. the rights conferred by it, or the state of the property conveyed.

    4. to convey or place (property) under a mortgage.

    5. to place under advance obligation; pledge.

    [1350 1400; Middle English Old French mortgage =mort dead ( Latin mortuus ) + gage gage 1 ]

    mortgage

    1. the giving of property, usually real property, as security to a creditor for payment of a debt.
    2. the deed pledging the security.

    mortgage

    Past participle: mortgaged
    Gerund: mortgaging

    Shimerda: he was unable to meet a note which fell due on the first of November; had to pay an exorbitant bonus on renewing it, and to give a mortgage on his pigs and horses and even his milk cow.

    Haley has come into possession of a mortgage. which, if I don’t clear off with him directly, will take everything before it.

    We build our churches almost without regard to cost; we rear an edifice which is an adornment to the town, and we gild it, and fresco it, and mortgage it, and do everything we can think of to perfect it, and then spoil it all by putting a bell on it which afflicts everybody who hears it, giving some the headache, others St.

    But it’s finished, that’s one comfort, and we’ll have a lovely time when we’re all grown up and the mortgage is paid off.

    To the eye it is fair enough, here; but seen in its integrity, under the sky, and by the daylight, it is a crumbling tower of waste, mismanagement, extortion, debt, mortgage. oppression, hunger, nakedness, and suffering.

    But these shares do not represent wealth actually in existence; they are a mortgage on the labor of unborn generations of laborers, who must work to keep me and mine in idleness and luxury.

    To save the boy, I had to sell my lands and mortgage my ancestral castle; and this not being enough, in the end I have had to borrow money, at a ruinous interest, from my lord of Hereford.

    We make in our case a deposit, on a mortgage. which is an advance, as you see, since we gain at least ten, fifteen, twenty, or a hundred livres’ worth of iron in exchange for our money.

    I have heard my grandfather say that old Peter gave his father a mortgage of this very house and land, to raise cash for his silly project.

    Ay, at seven per cent a month with a mortgage on the unborn calf,’ said a young Dogra, soldier going south on leave; and they all laughed.

    He had condescended to mortgage as far as he had the power, but he would never condescend to sell.

    By giving a chattel mortgage on their growing wheat, they borrowed enough, at twenty per cent, to buy seed corn and a plow.


    Mortgage – definition of mortgage by The Free Dictionary #obama #mortgage #relief


    #mortgage online

    #

    mortgage

    1. A loan for the purchase of real property, secured by a lien on the property.

    2. The document specifying the terms and conditions of the repayment of such a loan.

    3. The repayment obligation associated with such a loan: a family who cannot afford their mortgage.

    4. The right to payment associated with such a loan: a bank that buys mortgages from originators.

    5. The lien on the property associated with such a loan.

    1. To pledge (real property) as the security for a loan.

    2. To make subject to a claim or risk; pledge against a doubtful outcome: mortgaged their political careers by taking an unpopular stand.

    [Middle English morgage. from Old French. mort. dead (from Vulgar Latin *mortus. from Latin mortuus. past participle of mor . to die ; see mer- in Indo-European roots ) + gage. pledge (of Germanic origin ).]

    Word History: In early Anglo-Norman law, property pledged as security for a loan was normally held by the creditor until the debt was repaid. Under this arrangement, the profits or benefits that accrued to the holder of the property could either be applied to the discharge of the principal or taken by the creditor as a form of interest. In his Tractatus de legibus et consuetudinibus regni Angliae (1189), Ranulf de Glanville explains that this latter type of pledge, in which the fruits of the property were taken by the creditor without reduction in the debt, was known by the term mort gage, which in Old French means “dead pledge.” Because of Christian prohibitions on profiting from money lending, however, the mortgage was considered a species of usury. The preferred type of pledge, in which the property’s profits went to paying off the debt and thus continued to benefit the borrower, was known in Old French by the term vif gage, “living pledge.” By the time of the great English jurist Thomas Littleton’s Treatise on Tenures (1481), however, the mortgage had evolved into its modern form a conditional pledge in which the property (and its profits) remain in possession of the debtor during the loan’s repayment. This led Littleton and his followers, such as the influential jurist Sir Edward Coke (1552-1634), to explain the mort in mortgage in terms of the permanent loss of the property in the event the borrower fails to repay, rather than of the loss of the profits from the property over the duration of the loan.

    mortgage

    1. (Banking Finance) an agreement under which a person borrows money to buy property, esp a house, and the lender may take possession of the property if the borrower fails to repay the money

    2. (Banking Finance) the deed effecting such an agreement

    3. (Banking Finance) the loan obtained under such an agreement: a mortgage of £148 000.

    4. (Banking Finance) a regular payment of money borrowed under such an agreement: a mortgage of £447 per month.

    (Banking Finance) to pledge (a house or other property) as security for the repayment of a loan

    (Banking Finance) of or relating to a mortgage: a mortgage payment.

    [C14: from Old French, literally: dead pledge, from mort dead + gage security, gage 1 ]

    mort gage

    1. a conveyance of an interest in property as security for the repayment of money borrowed.

    2. the deed by which such a transaction is effected.

    3. the rights conferred by it, or the state of the property conveyed.

    4. to convey or place (property) under a mortgage.

    5. to place under advance obligation; pledge.

    [1350 1400; Middle English Old French mortgage =mort dead ( Latin mortuus ) + gage gage 1 ]

    mortgage

    1. the giving of property, usually real property, as security to a creditor for payment of a debt.
    2. the deed pledging the security.

    mortgage

    Past participle: mortgaged
    Gerund: mortgaging

    Shimerda: he was unable to meet a note which fell due on the first of November; had to pay an exorbitant bonus on renewing it, and to give a mortgage on his pigs and horses and even his milk cow.

    Haley has come into possession of a mortgage. which, if I don’t clear off with him directly, will take everything before it.

    We build our churches almost without regard to cost; we rear an edifice which is an adornment to the town, and we gild it, and fresco it, and mortgage it, and do everything we can think of to perfect it, and then spoil it all by putting a bell on it which afflicts everybody who hears it, giving some the headache, others St.

    But it’s finished, that’s one comfort, and we’ll have a lovely time when we’re all grown up and the mortgage is paid off.

    To the eye it is fair enough, here; but seen in its integrity, under the sky, and by the daylight, it is a crumbling tower of waste, mismanagement, extortion, debt, mortgage. oppression, hunger, nakedness, and suffering.

    But these shares do not represent wealth actually in existence; they are a mortgage on the labor of unborn generations of laborers, who must work to keep me and mine in idleness and luxury.

    To save the boy, I had to sell my lands and mortgage my ancestral castle; and this not being enough, in the end I have had to borrow money, at a ruinous interest, from my lord of Hereford.

    We make in our case a deposit, on a mortgage. which is an advance, as you see, since we gain at least ten, fifteen, twenty, or a hundred livres’ worth of iron in exchange for our money.

    I have heard my grandfather say that old Peter gave his father a mortgage of this very house and land, to raise cash for his silly project.

    Ay, at seven per cent a month with a mortgage on the unborn calf,’ said a young Dogra, soldier going south on leave; and they all laughed.

    He had condescended to mortgage as far as he had the power, but he would never condescend to sell.

    By giving a chattel mortgage on their growing wheat, they borrowed enough, at twenty per cent, to buy seed corn and a plow.