Freddie Mac Home, can i get a home loan.#Can #i #get #a #home #loan


$4.7 Billion Q3 Net Income

Our transformation is delivering strong results

Big Data Is a Big Deal at Freddie Mac

Big data is the buzzword du jour. There’s no shortage of data in the mortgage finance industry but simply gathering a lot of data isn’t useful.

Can i get a home loan

Can i get a home loan

Could a Manufactured Home Be Right for You?

Manufactured homes have improved a lot over time, and are an important source of housing across the country. In Kentucky, a new program can help get you ready to buy one.

Annual Affordable Housing Goals

See how we’re helping to meet affordable housing needs nationwide.

The ‘B’ Word: Can We Spot the Next House Price Bubble?

We’re Tracking The Market

Freddie Mac surveys lenders each week on the rates, fees and points for the most popular mortgage products. Average Mortgage Rates as of November 16, 2017

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When the hard work is done and I see results, it gives me a strong sense of purpose.

production manager, Multifamily

I like forging new territory and dealing with large initiatives.

business process director, Single-Family

I think if you really put your mind into something, you can do almost anything.

IT systems analyst, Single-Family

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California Housing Finance Agency, CalHFA, can i get a home loan.#Can #i #get #a #home


CalHFA supports the needs of renters and homebuyers

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  • Can i get a home loan
  • Can i get a home loan
  • Can i get a home loan
  • Can i get a home loan
  • Can i get a home loan
  • Can i get a home loan

Homebuyers

Can i get a home loan

Can i get a home loan

CalHFA Homeowners

Can i get a home loan

Can i get a home loan

Lenders/Realtors

Can i get a home loan

Can i get a home loan

Can i get a home loan

Multifamily Developers/Managers

Can i get a home loan

Can i get a home loan

What’s New at CalHFA

  • Program Bulletin #2017-13 – Proposed Federal Tax Reform and the Uncertainty of Mortgage Credit Certificate Program
  • Press Release 2017-11-09 – CalHFA Launches New Path to Homeownership for Service Members and Veterans
  • Video – Cal-EEM + Grant helps homebuyers with $24,000 of energy upgrades
  • Press Release 2017-10-03 – CalHFA Increases Access to Manufactured Home Loans
  • Program Bulletin #2017-12 – Closing Document Revisions for MyHome Assistance Program and Extra Credit Teacher Home Purchase Program (ECTP) when combined with a CalHFA Government Insured/Guaranteed First Mortgage
  • Program Bulletin #2017-11 – CalHFA Launches New CalHFA VA Loan Program
  • Press Release 2017-09-14 – Michael Carroll is CalHFA s New Director of Multifamily Programs
  • Program Bulletin #2017-10 – Updated Sales Price Limits
  • Program Bulletin #2017-09 – Updated Income Limits for all CalHFA Conventional and FHA Loan First Mortgage Programs
  • Program Bulletin #2017-08 – Updates to Manufactured Housing Guidelines for All CalHFA FHA Loan Programs
  • Press Release 2017-07-11 – CalHFA Helps Hundreds with Free Homebuyer Education
  • Program Bulletin #2017-07 – Escrow Holdbacks Allowed and Name Change for the Notice of Conditional Approval
  • Get to know CalHFA and our programs by viewing our Video Library.
  • Enews announcements can be found on our Archived Page.

Hardship Foreclosure Assistance

  • Keep Your Home California programs are designed for homeowners who are struggling to pay their mortgages.

Can i get a home loan

  • The Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP) is available on loans owned by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. If these loans were insured by the California Housing Loan Insurance Fund they may be eligible to have existing mortgage insurance transferred to a new refinance loan.

Other Information

  • Can i get a home loanThe California Victims Compensation Board is available to help California victims of the October 1 shooting in Las Vegas. If you’ve lost a family member, been injured or attended the Route 91 Harvest Festival where this terrible tragedy occurred on Sunday night, CalVCB can provide financial assistance. Visit the California Victims Compensation Board website and news release for more information.
  • Public Notice: Environmental Assessment For Whittier Downey SE Apartments (300 MB)
  • Public Notice: Environmental Assessment For North San Pedro Studios
  • Public Notice: 2017 Mortgage Credit Certificate Program
  • Veterans Housing and Homelessness Prevention Program (VHHP)
  • 2014 California Affordable Housing Cost Study
  • Language Access Complaint Form /Formulario de queja de acceso por idioma

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Rural USDA Home Loan, Rural Housing Loan Service Center for USDA guaranteed home loan purchase


Rural Housing Service Center

USDA Approved Lender

Government Program Specialists

RANLIfe Financial Center

RURAL LOAN PROGRAMS

FILE LOOKUP

Can i get a home loan Refinance

Can i get a home loan

RANLife is a USDA, FHA, VA FNMA and FHLMC approved lender.

RANLife is not affiliated with USDA or any other government entity.

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RANLife Rural Housing Loan Service Center

The USDA Guaranteed Loan Program is a federal program offered through the United States Department of Agriculture. Rural Housing through the USDA program provides a number of homeownership opportunities to rural Americans, as well as programs for home renovation and repair. This is an excellent product and benefit for those individuals that qualify. Rural Housing also offers 100% financing opportunities for those who qualify.

Rural Housing loans are now easier to qualify and are a financially secure option for home financing regardless of your situation.

Can i get a home loan

Common USDA Qustions

  • Does an USDA Home Loan have mortgage insurance?
  • How much can I borrow on a USDA Loan?
  • How can I determine if I qualify for a USDA Home Loan?
  • What are my USDA refinancing options?

MORE

**NOTICE A70: RANLife Home Loans is funding the USDA Pilot Program. This program allows you to skip a mortgage payment, lower your interest rate by more than a percentage point, and you don’t have to get a home appraisal. Call a representative to see if you qualify 800.461.4152.**

Can i get a home loan

There are several advantages to using USDA’s Home Loan Program.

  • USDA 100% Financing
  • Low Monthly Mortgage Insurance(MI)with a USDA loan
  • Low USDA Mortgage Interest Rates
  • USDA Low Closing Costs
  • USDA Zero Down Payment.
  • Easy Credit Qualifying with USDA
  • Never a Pre-payment Penalty with USDA

Thinking of Buying a Rural Home?

Did You Know?

Did you know that even with the advent of a low monthly mip premium usda payments are still significantly lower than an FHA loan that has a minimum of a 3.5% down payment?

USDA Rural Home Purchase?

Whether you are buying your first home or looking to move up the USDA Home Loan Purchase Program is one of the best purchase programs available today for our rural communities. Click on the USDA Purchase Application to see if you qualify.

USDA Rural Home Refinance?

If you bought your home through a USDA home purchase program then you are eligible for a USDA home streamline refinance. Call a program representative at 800.461.4152, or fill out the quick online refinance application on the left, to see if you home qualifies.

**NOTICE B68: RANLife Home Loans is still funding USDA Home Purchase Loans. Call a representative to see if you qualify 800.461.4152.**2.07.2013

**NOTICE C68: RANLife Home Loans continues to lock USDA Refinance Loans. Call a representative to see if you qualify 800.461.4152.**2.07.2013

**NOTICE B43: RANLife Home Loans still allows the funding of a USDA renovation loan. Call a representative to see if you qualify 800.461.4152.**02.09.2012

**NOTICE B41: Major Lenders will stop funding USDA Loans over the next few of months. RANLife Rural Home Loan will continue to fund USDA Home Loans. In 2010 most lenders stopped funding USDA Loans during October, November and December. In 2010 RANLife never stopped funding its USDA Loan Program. Call a representative to see if you qualify 800.461.4152.12.1.11**

*NOTICE C10: USDA Monthly MIP. If you don’t have a conditional commitment from USDA by 9/30/2011 you will be forced to have monthly mortgage insurance on your USDA Loan. RANLife can close your home purchase loan fast. Call a RANLife Rural Home Loans representative to get your USDA loan expedited today.7.1.11**

**NOTICE A40: USDA will be changing its USDA eligible areas based on the new 2010 census bureau. Does your area now qualify? Is your area going to be discontinued from the USDA guarantee? Call a RANLife Rural Home Loans representative to see if your area will still qualify.1.11**

**NOTICE A30: RANLife Rural Home Loans is now offering a USDA Renovation Loan. Now you can obtain financing and include home improvements into one USDA Home Loan.**

**NOTICE A20.1: As the mortgage lending industry continues to stop and start USDA funding RANLife Rural Home Loans has maintained funding for USDA Rural Housing Purchase Loans throughout the entire year of 2010 and is committed to providing USDA home loan funding throughout 2011.**

**NOTICE B40: RANLife Rural Home loans has continued to fund the refinancing of USDA Home Loans. Call a representative to see if you qualify 800.461.4152.**


How Much House Can I Afford? New House Calculator, can i get a home loan.#Can


How Much House Can I Afford?

Determine how much house you can afford. Estimate the mortgage amount that best fits your budget with our new house calculator. Find out what factors determine home affordability.

2. Debt and monthly expenses.

4. Down payment amount.

Can i get a home loan

Simply fill out the fields below and click on calculate. The calculator will then analyze your monthly income, expenses, and future property taxes and insurance to estimate the mortgage amount that would best fit your budget. Learn more about what factors lenders consider here.

Available Mortgage Limits:

Home Buyer Resources

How much money can I borrow for a mortgage?

Use this calculator to figure out how much money you can borrow.

Ready to stop renting and buy a home?

Thinking of buying a home? Consider these factors before making your decision.

5 first-time homebuyer mistakes

Avoid these common mistakes when buying your first home.

How much house can you buy?

Mortgage lenders calculate affordability based on your personal information, including income, debt expenses and size of down payment. The mortgage calculator uses similar criteria.

Here are some of the factors that lenders consider.

Debt-to-income ratios

Lenders will calculate how much of your monthly income goes toward debt payments. This calculation is called a debt-to-income ratio.

Debt-to-income ratio

Percentage of monthly income that is spent on debt payments, including mortgages, student loans, auto loans, minimum credit card payments and child support.

For example: Jessie and Pat together earn $10,000 a month. Their total debt payments are $3,800 a month. Their debt-to-income ratio is 38 percent.

$3,800 / $10,000 = 0.38

Front-end ratio

A standard rule for lenders is that your monthly housing payment (principal, interest, taxes and insurance) should not take up more than 28 percent of your income before taxes. This debt-to-income ratio is called the housing ratio or front-end ratio.

Back-end ratio

Lenders also calculate the back-end ratio. It includes all debt commitments, including car loan, student loan and minimum credit card payments, together with your house payment. Lenders prefer a back-end ratio of 36 percent or less.

Ratios aren’t carved in stone

Those recommended ratios (28 percent front-end and 36 percent back-end) aren’t ironclad. In many cases, lenders approve applicants with higher debt-to-income ratios. Under the qualified mortgage rule, federal regulations give legal protection to well-documented mortgages with back-end ratios (all debts, including house payments) up to 43 percent.

That’s been one of the bigger drivers (of affordability) because that is basically drawing a box around what’s a qualified mortgage, says Tim Skinner, home lending sales and service manager for Huntington Bank in Columbus, Ohio. A large portion of the lending community has decided to stay in that box.

Credit history

If you have a good credit history, you are likely to get a lower interest rate, which means you could take on a bigger loan. The best rates tend to go to borrowers with credit scores of 740 or higher.

Down payment

With a larger down payment, you will likely need to take on a smaller loan and can afford to buy a higher-priced house.

Down payment

Money from your savings that you give to the home’s seller. A mortgage pays the rest of the purchase price. It’s usually expressed as a percentage: On a $100,000 home, a $13,000 down payment would be 13 percent.

You don’t need to have a perfect credit score or a 20 percent down payment to qualify for a mortgage. Some lenders will accept down payments as small as 3 percent. Federal Housing Administration-insured mortgages have a minimum down payment of 3.5 percent.

Lifestyle factors

While the lender’s guidelines are a good place to start, consider how your lifestyle affects how much of a mortgage you can take on. For instance, if you send your children to a private school, that is a major expense that lenders don’t typically account for. Or maybe you like to spend a lot on dining out or clothes. And if you live in a city with good public transportation, such as San Francisco or New York, and are able to rely on public transportation, you can likely afford to spend more on housing.

Consider all your options

Look into various state government programs that provide certain concessions, especially for first-time homebuyers. There also are programs that you might qualify for based on your income or occupation. You may be able to get assistance with your down payment so you can take on a smaller loan.

Nikitra Bailey, executive vice president for the Center for Responsible Lending in Durham, North Carolina, says, A lot of creditworthy borrowers have been unable to secure mortgages in the tighter mortgage environment. We are hopeful that these efforts will open up credit for borrowers who are deserving so that we will see an increase in first-time homebuyers going forward.

Don’t overload yourself

Be careful. It’s wise to give yourself breathing room financially. You don’t have to deplete your savings, and you don’t have to make the maximum monthly payment that you qualify for.

Why is it wise to spend less than you can afford? As a homeowner, you will face unexpected expenses, such as a leaky roof or a failed water heater. You will have to pay for maintenance. You might even face a job loss.

When gas prices started to go up (during the housing downturn) and people were maxed out on their homes, that’s when we started seeing a lot of the defaults happen, says Kathy Cummings, homeownership solutions and education executive for Bank of America. There were a lot of other economic factors going into it, but if you are maxing yourself out on your home, you can’t absorb some of those impacts.

TIP: Refinancing and stretching the loan out for the longest possible term will help free up cash flow, but drawbacks include paying more interest and building less equity.


California Housing Finance Agency, CalHFA, can i get a home loan.#Can #i #get #a #home


CalHFA supports the needs of renters and homebuyers

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  • Can i get a home loan
  • Can i get a home loan
  • Can i get a home loan
  • Can i get a home loan
  • Can i get a home loan
  • Can i get a home loan

Homebuyers

Can i get a home loan

Can i get a home loan

CalHFA Homeowners

Can i get a home loan

Can i get a home loan

Lenders/Realtors

Can i get a home loan

Can i get a home loan

Can i get a home loan

Multifamily Developers/Managers

Can i get a home loan

Can i get a home loan

What’s New at CalHFA

  • Program Bulletin #2017-13 – Proposed Federal Tax Reform and the Uncertainty of Mortgage Credit Certificate Program
  • Press Release 2017-11-09 – CalHFA Launches New Path to Homeownership for Service Members and Veterans
  • Video – Cal-EEM + Grant helps homebuyers with $24,000 of energy upgrades
  • Press Release 2017-10-03 – CalHFA Increases Access to Manufactured Home Loans
  • Program Bulletin #2017-12 – Closing Document Revisions for MyHome Assistance Program and Extra Credit Teacher Home Purchase Program (ECTP) when combined with a CalHFA Government Insured/Guaranteed First Mortgage
  • Program Bulletin #2017-11 – CalHFA Launches New CalHFA VA Loan Program
  • Press Release 2017-09-14 – Michael Carroll is CalHFA s New Director of Multifamily Programs
  • Program Bulletin #2017-10 – Updated Sales Price Limits
  • Program Bulletin #2017-09 – Updated Income Limits for all CalHFA Conventional and FHA Loan First Mortgage Programs
  • Program Bulletin #2017-08 – Updates to Manufactured Housing Guidelines for All CalHFA FHA Loan Programs
  • Press Release 2017-07-11 – CalHFA Helps Hundreds with Free Homebuyer Education
  • Program Bulletin #2017-07 – Escrow Holdbacks Allowed and Name Change for the Notice of Conditional Approval
  • Get to know CalHFA and our programs by viewing our Video Library.
  • Enews announcements can be found on our Archived Page.

Hardship Foreclosure Assistance

  • Keep Your Home California programs are designed for homeowners who are struggling to pay their mortgages.

Can i get a home loan

  • The Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP) is available on loans owned by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. If these loans were insured by the California Housing Loan Insurance Fund they may be eligible to have existing mortgage insurance transferred to a new refinance loan.

Other Information

  • Can i get a home loanThe California Victims Compensation Board is available to help California victims of the October 1 shooting in Las Vegas. If you’ve lost a family member, been injured or attended the Route 91 Harvest Festival where this terrible tragedy occurred on Sunday night, CalVCB can provide financial assistance. Visit the California Victims Compensation Board website and news release for more information.
  • Public Notice: Environmental Assessment For Whittier Downey SE Apartments (300 MB)
  • Public Notice: Environmental Assessment For North San Pedro Studios
  • Public Notice: 2017 Mortgage Credit Certificate Program
  • Veterans Housing and Homelessness Prevention Program (VHHP)
  • 2014 California Affordable Housing Cost Study
  • Language Access Complaint Form /Formulario de queja de acceso por idioma

Can i get a home loanCan i get a home loan

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How Much House Can I Afford? New House Calculator, can i get a home loan.#Can


How Much House Can I Afford?

Determine how much house you can afford. Estimate the mortgage amount that best fits your budget with our new house calculator. Find out what factors determine home affordability.

2. Debt and monthly expenses.

4. Down payment amount.

Can i get a home loan

Simply fill out the fields below and click on calculate. The calculator will then analyze your monthly income, expenses, and future property taxes and insurance to estimate the mortgage amount that would best fit your budget. Learn more about what factors lenders consider here.

Available Mortgage Limits:

Home Buyer Resources

How much money can I borrow for a mortgage?

Use this calculator to figure out how much money you can borrow.

Ready to stop renting and buy a home?

Thinking of buying a home? Consider these factors before making your decision.

5 first-time homebuyer mistakes

Avoid these common mistakes when buying your first home.

How much house can you buy?

Mortgage lenders calculate affordability based on your personal information, including income, debt expenses and size of down payment. The mortgage calculator uses similar criteria.

Here are some of the factors that lenders consider.

Debt-to-income ratios

Lenders will calculate how much of your monthly income goes toward debt payments. This calculation is called a debt-to-income ratio.

Debt-to-income ratio

Percentage of monthly income that is spent on debt payments, including mortgages, student loans, auto loans, minimum credit card payments and child support.

For example: Jessie and Pat together earn $10,000 a month. Their total debt payments are $3,800 a month. Their debt-to-income ratio is 38 percent.

$3,800 / $10,000 = 0.38

Front-end ratio

A standard rule for lenders is that your monthly housing payment (principal, interest, taxes and insurance) should not take up more than 28 percent of your income before taxes. This debt-to-income ratio is called the housing ratio or front-end ratio.

Back-end ratio

Lenders also calculate the back-end ratio. It includes all debt commitments, including car loan, student loan and minimum credit card payments, together with your house payment. Lenders prefer a back-end ratio of 36 percent or less.

Ratios aren’t carved in stone

Those recommended ratios (28 percent front-end and 36 percent back-end) aren’t ironclad. In many cases, lenders approve applicants with higher debt-to-income ratios. Under the qualified mortgage rule, federal regulations give legal protection to well-documented mortgages with back-end ratios (all debts, including house payments) up to 43 percent.

That’s been one of the bigger drivers (of affordability) because that is basically drawing a box around what’s a qualified mortgage, says Tim Skinner, home lending sales and service manager for Huntington Bank in Columbus, Ohio. A large portion of the lending community has decided to stay in that box.

Credit history

If you have a good credit history, you are likely to get a lower interest rate, which means you could take on a bigger loan. The best rates tend to go to borrowers with credit scores of 740 or higher.

Down payment

With a larger down payment, you will likely need to take on a smaller loan and can afford to buy a higher-priced house.

Down payment

Money from your savings that you give to the home’s seller. A mortgage pays the rest of the purchase price. It’s usually expressed as a percentage: On a $100,000 home, a $13,000 down payment would be 13 percent.

You don’t need to have a perfect credit score or a 20 percent down payment to qualify for a mortgage. Some lenders will accept down payments as small as 3 percent. Federal Housing Administration-insured mortgages have a minimum down payment of 3.5 percent.

Lifestyle factors

While the lender’s guidelines are a good place to start, consider how your lifestyle affects how much of a mortgage you can take on. For instance, if you send your children to a private school, that is a major expense that lenders don’t typically account for. Or maybe you like to spend a lot on dining out or clothes. And if you live in a city with good public transportation, such as San Francisco or New York, and are able to rely on public transportation, you can likely afford to spend more on housing.

Consider all your options

Look into various state government programs that provide certain concessions, especially for first-time homebuyers. There also are programs that you might qualify for based on your income or occupation. You may be able to get assistance with your down payment so you can take on a smaller loan.

Nikitra Bailey, executive vice president for the Center for Responsible Lending in Durham, North Carolina, says, A lot of creditworthy borrowers have been unable to secure mortgages in the tighter mortgage environment. We are hopeful that these efforts will open up credit for borrowers who are deserving so that we will see an increase in first-time homebuyers going forward.

Don’t overload yourself

Be careful. It’s wise to give yourself breathing room financially. You don’t have to deplete your savings, and you don’t have to make the maximum monthly payment that you qualify for.

Why is it wise to spend less than you can afford? As a homeowner, you will face unexpected expenses, such as a leaky roof or a failed water heater. You will have to pay for maintenance. You might even face a job loss.

When gas prices started to go up (during the housing downturn) and people were maxed out on their homes, that’s when we started seeing a lot of the defaults happen, says Kathy Cummings, homeownership solutions and education executive for Bank of America. There were a lot of other economic factors going into it, but if you are maxing yourself out on your home, you can’t absorb some of those impacts.

TIP: Refinancing and stretching the loan out for the longest possible term will help free up cash flow, but drawbacks include paying more interest and building less equity.


FinAid, Calculators, Loan Calculator, can i get a home loan.#Can #i #get #a #home #loan


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This Loan Payment Calculator computes an estimate of the size of your monthly loan payments and the annual salary required to manage them without too much financial difficulty. This loan calculator can be used with Federal education loans (Stafford, Perkins and PLUS) and most private student loans. (This student loan calculator can also be used as an auto loan calculator or to calculate your mortgage payments.)

This loan calculator assumes that the interest rate remains constant throughout the life of the loan. The Federal Stafford Loan has a fixed interest rate of 6.8% and the Federal PLUS loan has a fixed rate of 7.9%. (Perkins loans have a fixed interest rate of 5%.)

This loan calculator also assumes that the loan will be repaid in equal monthly installments through standard loan amortization (i.e., standard or extended loan repayment). The results will not be accurate for some of the alternate repayment plans, such as graduated repayment and income contingent repayment.

Loan fees are used to adjust the initial loan balance so that the borrower nets the same amount after the fees are deducted.

Some educational loans have a minimum monthly payment. Please enter the appropriate figure ($50 for Stafford Loans, $40 for Perkins Loans and $50 for PLUS Loans) in the minimum payment field. Enter a higher figure to see how much money you can save by paying off your debt faster. It will also show you how long it will take to pay off the loan at the higher monthly payment. You can also calculate private student loan eligibility on comparison sites like Credible.

The questions concerning enrollment status, degree program and total years in college are optional and are designed to evaluate whether the total debt is excessive. The total years in college should include the total number of years in college so far (or projected) corresponding to the loan balance, including previous degrees received.


How Much House Can I Afford? New House Calculator, can i get a home loan.#Can


How Much House Can I Afford?

Determine how much house you can afford. Estimate the mortgage amount that best fits your budget with our new house calculator. Find out what factors determine home affordability.

2. Debt and monthly expenses.

4. Down payment amount.

Can i get a home loan

Simply fill out the fields below and click on calculate. The calculator will then analyze your monthly income, expenses, and future property taxes and insurance to estimate the mortgage amount that would best fit your budget. Learn more about what factors lenders consider here.

Available Mortgage Limits:

Home Buyer Resources

How much money can I borrow for a mortgage?

Use this calculator to figure out how much money you can borrow.

Ready to stop renting and buy a home?

Thinking of buying a home? Consider these factors before making your decision.

5 first-time homebuyer mistakes

Avoid these common mistakes when buying your first home.

How much house can you buy?

Mortgage lenders calculate affordability based on your personal information, including income, debt expenses and size of down payment. The mortgage calculator uses similar criteria.

Here are some of the factors that lenders consider.

Debt-to-income ratios

Lenders will calculate how much of your monthly income goes toward debt payments. This calculation is called a debt-to-income ratio.

Debt-to-income ratio

Percentage of monthly income that is spent on debt payments, including mortgages, student loans, auto loans, minimum credit card payments and child support.

For example: Jessie and Pat together earn $10,000 a month. Their total debt payments are $3,800 a month. Their debt-to-income ratio is 38 percent.

$3,800 / $10,000 = 0.38

Front-end ratio

A standard rule for lenders is that your monthly housing payment (principal, interest, taxes and insurance) should not take up more than 28 percent of your income before taxes. This debt-to-income ratio is called the housing ratio or front-end ratio.

Back-end ratio

Lenders also calculate the back-end ratio. It includes all debt commitments, including car loan, student loan and minimum credit card payments, together with your house payment. Lenders prefer a back-end ratio of 36 percent or less.

Ratios aren’t carved in stone

Those recommended ratios (28 percent front-end and 36 percent back-end) aren’t ironclad. In many cases, lenders approve applicants with higher debt-to-income ratios. Under the qualified mortgage rule, federal regulations give legal protection to well-documented mortgages with back-end ratios (all debts, including house payments) up to 43 percent.

That’s been one of the bigger drivers (of affordability) because that is basically drawing a box around what’s a qualified mortgage, says Tim Skinner, home lending sales and service manager for Huntington Bank in Columbus, Ohio. A large portion of the lending community has decided to stay in that box.

Credit history

If you have a good credit history, you are likely to get a lower interest rate, which means you could take on a bigger loan. The best rates tend to go to borrowers with credit scores of 740 or higher.

Down payment

With a larger down payment, you will likely need to take on a smaller loan and can afford to buy a higher-priced house.

Down payment

Money from your savings that you give to the home’s seller. A mortgage pays the rest of the purchase price. It’s usually expressed as a percentage: On a $100,000 home, a $13,000 down payment would be 13 percent.

You don’t need to have a perfect credit score or a 20 percent down payment to qualify for a mortgage. Some lenders will accept down payments as small as 3 percent. Federal Housing Administration-insured mortgages have a minimum down payment of 3.5 percent.

Lifestyle factors

While the lender’s guidelines are a good place to start, consider how your lifestyle affects how much of a mortgage you can take on. For instance, if you send your children to a private school, that is a major expense that lenders don’t typically account for. Or maybe you like to spend a lot on dining out or clothes. And if you live in a city with good public transportation, such as San Francisco or New York, and are able to rely on public transportation, you can likely afford to spend more on housing.

Consider all your options

Look into various state government programs that provide certain concessions, especially for first-time homebuyers. There also are programs that you might qualify for based on your income or occupation. You may be able to get assistance with your down payment so you can take on a smaller loan.

Nikitra Bailey, executive vice president for the Center for Responsible Lending in Durham, North Carolina, says, A lot of creditworthy borrowers have been unable to secure mortgages in the tighter mortgage environment. We are hopeful that these efforts will open up credit for borrowers who are deserving so that we will see an increase in first-time homebuyers going forward.

Don’t overload yourself

Be careful. It’s wise to give yourself breathing room financially. You don’t have to deplete your savings, and you don’t have to make the maximum monthly payment that you qualify for.

Why is it wise to spend less than you can afford? As a homeowner, you will face unexpected expenses, such as a leaky roof or a failed water heater. You will have to pay for maintenance. You might even face a job loss.

When gas prices started to go up (during the housing downturn) and people were maxed out on their homes, that’s when we started seeing a lot of the defaults happen, says Kathy Cummings, homeownership solutions and education executive for Bank of America. There were a lot of other economic factors going into it, but if you are maxing yourself out on your home, you can’t absorb some of those impacts.

TIP: Refinancing and stretching the loan out for the longest possible term will help free up cash flow, but drawbacks include paying more interest and building less equity.


How Much House Can I Afford – Home Affordability Calculator #bankruptcy #mortgage #lenders


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Affordability calculator

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Affordability calculator help

“How much house can I afford?” is a question we hear frequently from those looking to purchase a new home. The mortgage you can afford depends on many factors, including your target monthly payment, annual income, and down payment amount.

Zillow’s mortgage affordability calculator helps you determine what you can comfortably afford to pay based on your personal circumstances. It evaluates the percentage of your monthly income that goes toward existing debts to help identify how much extra you have to spend on a mortgage payment. Your remaining income after debt and taxes should be enough to cover living expenses and savings goals, and it is wise to have some cash set aside to accommodate any unexpected repairs or financial emergencies.

Annual income This is the combined annual income for you and your co-borrower. Include all income before taxes, including base salary, commissions, bonuses, overtime, tips, rental income, investment income, alimony, child support, etc. Down payment This is the amount of money you will put towards a down payment on the house. Make sure you still have cash left over after the down payment to cover unexpected repairs or financial emergencies. Monthly debt

Include all of you and your co-borrower’s monthly debts, including: minimum monthly required credit card payments, car payments, student loans, alimony/child support payments, any house payments (rent or mortgage) other than the new mortgage you are seeking, rental property maintenance, and other personal loans with periodic payments.

Do NOT include: credit card balances you pay off in full each month, existing house payments (rent or mortgage) that will become obsolete as a result of the new mortgage you are seeking, or the new mortgage you are seeking.

Interest rate This is the interest rate for the loan you will receive. It is pre-filled with the current 30-yr fixed average rate on Zillow Mortgages. Debt-to-income (DTI) Your DTI is expressed as a percentage and is your total “minimum” monthly debt divided by your gross monthly income. The conventional limit for DTI is 36% of your monthly income, but this could be as high as 41% for FHA loans. A DTI of 20% or below is considered excellent. Income taxes This is an annual tax that governments place on individuals’ income. It includes federal tax, most states and some local entities. The national average is around 30% but can vary based on income, location, etc. Property taxes The mortgage payment calculator includes estimated property taxes. The value represents an annual tax on homeowners’ property and the tax amount is based on the home’s value. Homeowners insurance Commonly known as hazard insurance, most lenders require insurance to provide damage protection for your home and personal property from a variety of events, including fire, lightning, burglary, vandalism, storms, explosions, and more. All homeowner’s insurance policies contain personal liability coverage, which protects against lawsuits involving injuries that occur on and off your property. Mortgage insurance (PMI) Mortgage insurance is required primarily for borrowers with a down payment of less than 20% of the home’s purchase price. It protects lenders against some or most of the losses that can occur when a borrower defaults on a mortgage loan. Also known as PMI (Private Mortgage Insurance). HOA dues Typically, owners of condos or townhomes are required to pay homeowners association dues (known as HOA fees), to cover common amenities or services within the property such as garbage collection, landscaping, snow removal, pool maintenance, and hazard insurance. Loan term This is the length of time you choose to pay off your loan (e.g. 30 years, 20 years, 15 years, etc.) Full report Click on the Full Report link to see a printable report that includes mortgage payment breakdowns, total payments, and a full mortgage payment amortization calculation (table and chart). Amortization table includes ability to view amortization by year or by month.

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How Much House Can I Afford?

Home Buyer Resources

How much house can you buy?

Mortgage lenders calculate affordability based on your personal information, including income, debt expenses and size of down payment. The mortgage calculator uses similar criteria.

Here are some of the factors that lenders consider.

Debt-to-income ratios

Lenders will calculate how much of your monthly income goes toward debt payments. This calculation is called a debt-to-income ratio.

Debt-to-income ratio

Percentage of monthly income that is spent on debt payments, including mortgages, student loans, auto loans, minimum credit card payments and child support.

Debt payments / income

For example: Jessie and Pat together earn $10,000 a month. Their total debt payments are $3,800 a month. Their debt-to-income ratio is 38 percent.

$3,800 / $10,000 = 0.38

Front-end ratio

A standard rule for lenders is that your monthly housing payment (principal, interest, taxes and insurance) should not take up more than 28 percent of your income before taxes. This debt-to-income ratio is called the housing ratio or front-end ratio.

Back-end ratio

Lenders also calculate the back-end ratio. It includes all debt commitments, including car loan, student loan and minimum credit card payments, together with your house payment. Lenders prefer a back-end ratio of 36 percent or less.

Ratios aren’t carved in stone

Those recommended ratios (28 percent front-end and 36 percent back-end) aren’t ironclad. In many cases, lenders approve applicants with higher debt-to-income ratios. Under the qualified mortgage rule, federal regulations give legal protection to well-documented mortgages with back-end ratios (all debts, including house payments) up to 43 percent.

That’s been one of the bigger drivers (of affordability) because that is basically drawing a box around what’s a qualified mortgage, says Tim Skinner, home lending sales and service manager for Huntington Bank in Columbus, Ohio. A large portion of the lending community has decided to stay in that box.

Credit history

If you have a good credit history, you are likely to get a lower interest rate, which means you could take on a bigger loan. The best rates tend to go to borrowers with credit scores of 740 or higher.

Down payment

With a larger down payment, you will likely need to take on a smaller loan and can afford to buy a higher-priced house.

Down payment

Money from your savings that you give to the home’s seller. A mortgage pays the rest of the purchase price. It’s usually expressed as a percentage: On a $100,000 home, a $13,000 down payment would be 13 percent.

You don’t need to have a perfect credit score or a 20 percent down payment to qualify for a mortgage. Some lenders will accept down payments as small as 3 percent. Federal Housing Administration-insured mortgages have a minimum down payment of 3.5 percent.

Lifestyle factors

While the lender’s guidelines are a good place to start, consider how your lifestyle affects how much of a mortgage you can take on. For instance, if you send your children to a private school, that is a major expense that lenders don’t typically account for. Or maybe you like to spend a lot on dining out or clothes. And if you live in a city with good public transportation, such as San Francisco or New York, and are able to rely on public transportation, you can likely afford to spend more on housing.

Consider all your options

Look into various state government programs that provide certain concessions, especially for first-time homebuyers. There also are programs that you might qualify for based on your income or occupation. You may be able to get assistance with your down payment so you can take on a smaller loan.

Nikitra Bailey, executive vice president for the Center for Responsible Lending in Durham, North Carolina, says, A lot of creditworthy borrowers have been unable to secure mortgages in the tighter mortgage environment. We are hopeful that these efforts will open up credit for borrowers who are deserving so that we will see an increase in first-time homebuyers going forward.

Don’t overload yourself

Be careful. It’s wise to give yourself breathing room financially. You don’t have to deplete your savings, and you don’t have to make the maximum monthly payment that you qualify for.

Why is it wise to spend less than you can afford? As a homeowner, you will face unexpected expenses, such as a leaky roof or a failed water heater. You will have to pay for maintenance. You might even face a job loss.

When gas prices started to go up (during the housing downturn) and people were maxed out on their homes, that’s when we started seeing a lot of the defaults happen, says Kathy Cummings, homeownership solutions and education executive for Bank of America. There were a lot of other economic factors going into it, but if you are maxing yourself out on your home, you can’t absorb some of those impacts.

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