Mortgage Calculator with Current Rates – Calculate Mortgage Payments with Ease from, calculate my mortgage.#Calculate

Mortgage Calculator

Calculate your monthly mortgage payment using the free calculator below. A house is the largest purchase most of us will ever make so it’s important to calculate what your mortgage payment will be and how much you can afford. Estimate your monthly payments and see the effect of adding extra payments.

Choose a lender below and lock in your estimated payment of $ or less

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Helpful Calculators & Tools

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About our Mortgage Rate Tables

About our Mortgage Rate Tables: The above mortgage loan information is provided to, or obtained by, Bankrate. Some lenders provide their mortgage loan terms to Bankrate for advertising purposes and Bankrate receives compensation from those advertisers (our “Advertisers”). Other lenders’ terms are gathered by Bankrate through its own research of available mortgage loan terms and that information is displayed in our rate table for applicable criteria. In the above table, an Advertiser listing can be identified and distinguished from other listings because it includes a “Next” button that can be used to click-through to the Advertiser’s own website or a phone number for the Advertiser.

Availability of Advertised Terms: Each Advertiser is responsible for the accuracy and availability of its own advertised terms. Bankrate cannot guaranty the accuracy or availability of any loan term shown above. However, Bankrate attempts to verify the accuracy and availability of the advertised terms through its quality assurance process and requires Advertisers to agree to our Terms and Conditions and to adhere to our Quality Control Program. Click here for rate criteria by loan product.

Loan Terms for Customers: Advertisers may have different loan terms on their own website from those advertised through To receive the rate, you must identify yourself to the Advertiser as a customer. This will typically be done by phone so you should look for the Advertiser’s phone number when you click-through to their website. In addition, credit unions may require membership.

Loans Above $424,100 May Have Different Loan Terms: If you are seeking a loan for more than $424,100, lenders in certain locations may be able to provide terms that are different from those shown in the table above. You should confirm your terms with the lender for your requested loan amount.

Taxes and Insurance Excluded from Loan Terms: The loan terms (APR and Payment examples) shown above do not include amounts for taxes or insurance premiums. Your monthly payment amount will be greater if taxes and insurance premiums are included.

Consumer Satisfaction: If you have used and have not received the advertised loan terms or otherwise been dissatisfied with your experience with any Advertiser, we want to hear from you. Please click here to provide your comments to Bankrate Quality Control.

Mortgage Calculator Help

Using an online mortgage calculator can help you quickly and accurately predict your monthly mortgage payment with just a few pieces of information. It can also show you the total amount of interest you’ll pay over the life of your mortgage. To use this calculator, you’ll need the following information:

The dollar amount you expect to pay for a home.

The down payment is money you give to the home’s seller. At least 20% down typically lets you avoid mortgage insurance.

If you’re getting a mortgage to buy a new home, you can find this number by subtracting your down payment from the home’s price. If you’re refinancing, this number will be the outstanding balance on your mortgage.

Mortgage Term (Years)

This is the length of the mortgage you’re considering. For example, if you’re buying new, you may choose a mortgage loan that lasts 30 years. On the other hand, a homeowner who is refinancing may opt of a loan that lasts 15 years.

Estimate the interest rate on a new mortgage by checking Bankrate’s mortgage rate tables for your area. Once you have a projected rate (your real-life rate may be different depending on your overall credit picture) you can plug it into the calculator.

Mortgage Start Date

Select the month, day and year when your mortgage payments will start.

Mortgage Calculator: Alternative Use

Most people use a mortgage calculator to estimate the payment on a new mortgage, but it can be used for other purposes, too. Here are some other uses:

1. Planning to pay off your mortgage early.

Use the “Extra payments” functionality of Bankrate’s mortgage calculator to find out how you can shorten your term and net big savings by paying extra money toward your loan’s principal each month, every year or even just one time.

To calculate the savings, click “Show Amortization Schedule” and enter a hypothetical amount into one of the payment categories (monthly, yearly or one-time) and then click “Apply Extra Payments” to see how much interest you’ll end up paying and your new payoff date.

2. Decide if an ARM is worth the risk.

The lower initial interest rate of an adjustable-rate mortgage, or ARM, can be tempting. But while an ARM may be appropriate for some borrowers, others may find that the lower initial interest rate won’t cut their monthly payments as much as they think.

To get an idea of how much you’ll really save initially, try entering the ARM interest rate into the mortgage calculator, leaving the term as 30 years. Then, compare those payments to the payments you get when you enter the rate for a conventional 30-year fixed mortgage. Doing so may confirm your initial hopes about the benefits of an ARM — or give you a reality check about whether the potential plusses of an ARM really outweigh the risks.

3. Find out when to get rid of private mortgage insurance.

You can use the mortgage calculator to determine when you’ll have 20 percent equity in your home. This percentage is the magic number for requesting that a lender wave private mortgage insurance requirement.

Simply enter in the original amount of your mortgage and the date you closed, and click “Show Amortization Schedule.” Then, multiply your original mortgage amount by 0.8 and match the result to the closest number on the far-right column of the amortization table to find out when you’ll reach 20 percent equity.

How do I Calculate Mortgage Payments in Excel, Home Guides, SF Gate, calculate my mortgage.#Calculate

How do I Calculate Mortgage Payments in Excel?

When you take out a fixed-rate mortgage to buy or refinance a home, your lender takes three numbers and plugs them into a formula to calculate your monthly payment. Those three numbers are your principal, or the amount of money you re borrowing; your interest rate; and the number of months in your loan term. You can quickly create a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel to perform the calculation for you–and, in the process, gain a greater understanding of just how a mortgage loan works.

Launch Microsoft Excel. Open a new workbook by pressing “Ctrl” and “N.”

Type “Principal” into cell A1 on the Excel worksheet. Type “Rate” into cell A2. Type “Months” into cell A3.

Enter the amount of the mortgage principal in cell B1.

Enter the interest rate in cell B2. Just enter the number; don’t use the percent sign. So, if your rate is 7 percent, just enter 7. If it’s 5.75 percent, enter 5.75.

Enter the number of months in the loan term in cell B3. Most mortgages are for either 15 or 30 years. Enter 180 for a 15-year mortgage or 360 for a 30-year loan. If your loan is for some other number of years, simply multiply that number by 12 and enter the result in cell B3.

Enter the following formula in cell A4, beginning with the “equals” sign: =B2/1200 This converts your annual interest rate to a decimal figure by dividing it by 100, then breaks it down into a monthly rate by dividing it by 12.

Enter the following formula in cell A5, beginning with the “equals” sign: =(1+A4)^B3 This step takes into account the compounding of the interest over the life of the loan.

Enter the following formula in cell A6, beginning with the “equals” sign: =(A4*A5)/(A5-1) This takes all the data and boils it down to a multiplier that’s applied to your principal to determine your monthly payment.

Enter the following formula in cell A7, beginning with the “equals” sign: =A6*B1 This applies the multiplier to your loan principal.

Right-click on cell A7 and select “Format Cells.” Set the formatting to “Currency.” Set “Decimal Places” to 2. Set the “Currency Symbol” to the dollar sign. Click “OK.” This cell now gives you the amount of your mortgage payment based on your principal, interest rate and loan term.

Things You Will Need

  • Microsoft Excel
  • Experiment with different principal amounts, interest rates and loan terms just by changing the values in cells B1, B2 and B3. The total payment in cell A7 will change to reflect the new figures.


  • Most lenders require that you pay your property taxes and homeowners’ insurance premiums on a monthly basis, with 1/12 of the total tacked on to each mortgage payment. Those amounts are not included in this calculation. The result in cell A7 includes only the amount that goes to your lender–the total principal and interest due each month.

References (2)

About the Author

Calculate my mortgage

Cam Merritt is a writer and editor specializing in business, personal finance and home design. He has contributed to USA Today, The Des Moines Register and Better Homes and Gardens publications. Merritt has a journalism degree from Drake University and is pursuing an MBA from the University of Iowa.

FinAid, Calculators, Loan Calculator, calculate home loan payment.#Calculate #home #loan #payment

calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan paymentCalculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

Calculate home loan payment

This Loan Payment Calculator computes an estimate of the size of your monthly loan payments and the annual salary required to manage them without too much financial difficulty. This loan calculator can be used with Federal education loans (Stafford, Perkins and PLUS) and most private student loans. (This student loan calculator can also be used as an auto loan calculator or to calculate your mortgage payments.)

This loan calculator assumes that the interest rate remains constant throughout the life of the loan. The Federal Stafford Loan has a fixed interest rate of 6.8% and the Federal PLUS loan has a fixed rate of 7.9%. (Perkins loans have a fixed interest rate of 5%.)

This loan calculator also assumes that the loan will be repaid in equal monthly installments through standard loan amortization (i.e., standard or extended loan repayment). The results will not be accurate for some of the alternate repayment plans, such as graduated repayment and income contingent repayment.

Loan fees are used to adjust the initial loan balance so that the borrower nets the same amount after the fees are deducted.

Some educational loans have a minimum monthly payment. Please enter the appropriate figure ($50 for Stafford Loans, $40 for Perkins Loans and $50 for PLUS Loans) in the minimum payment field. Enter a higher figure to see how much money you can save by paying off your debt faster. It will also show you how long it will take to pay off the loan at the higher monthly payment. You can also calculate private student loan eligibility on comparison sites like Credible.

The questions concerning enrollment status, degree program and total years in college are optional and are designed to evaluate whether the total debt is excessive. The total years in college should include the total number of years in college so far (or projected) corresponding to the loan balance, including previous degrees received.

How to Calculate the MIP for an FHA Loan, Home Guides, SF Gate, calculate home

How to Calculate the MIP for an FHA Loan

An FHA mortgage is a government-insured loan that requires the homeowner to pay a premium for the cost of insuring the loan. An FHA loan has an up-front premium payable when the loan is originated, and an annual premium included in each monthly mortgage payment. In August 2010 the U.S. Congress passed a law that significantly changed the way FHA mortgage insurance premiums would be calculated, effective October 2010.

Calculate the Up-Front MIP

Calculate the minimum FHA down payment amount by multiplying the cost of the house by 3.5 percent. The minimum down payment for an FHA loan is 3.5 percent. For example, if the home costs $200,000, the minimum down payment is $7,000.

Calculate the initial loan amount by subtracting your planned down payment from the price of the home. Using the minimum down payment in the example, the loan amount is $193,000.

Multiply the loan amount by 1 percent to calculate the up-front MIP. In the example loan, $193,000 multiplied by 1 percent yields an up-front MIP of $1,930.

Calculate the Annual MIP

Calculate the amortization schedule of the loan. If the up-front MIP will be financed, it should be added to the loan amount. Use an online loan amortization calculator.

Calculate the average outstanding balance for the first year of the mortgage. The average balance is calculated by adding together the original loan amount plus the loan balance after the first 11 payments and dividing the total by 12. In the example loan, the initial loan amount is $194,930; at a 5 percent rate, the average outstanding balance is $193,623.69.

Multiply the average outstanding balance by the annual MIP rate of 0.90 percent. In the example, $193,623.69 times 0.90 percent is $1,742.61.

Reduce the annual MIP amount by dividing by one plus the up-front MIP factor, if the up-front MIP was added to the loan amount. The up-front MIP is 1 percent, so the annual MIP result from above is divided by 1 plus 0.1, or 1.01. The result is $1,725.36. This is the annual MIP amount for the first year of the example FHA loan.

Divide the annual MIP amount by 12 for the amount that will be added to the monthly mortgage payment. In the example, $143.78 is added to each monthly loan payment.

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How to Calculate Your Mortgage Payment, calculate home loan payment.#Calculate #home #loan #payment

How to Calculate Your Mortgage Payment

Calculate home loan payment

Understanding your mortgage helps you make better decisions. Instead of just taking whatever you get, it pays to look at the numbers behind any loan – especially a big loan like a home loan.

To calculate a mortgage, you’ll need a few details about the loan. Then, you can do it all by hand or use free online calculators (or a spreadsheet) to crunch the numbers.

Most people only focus on the monthly payment, but there are other important details that you need to pay attention to.

We’ll start with calculating the payment, and we’ll also look at how much you pay in interest ​and how much you actually pay off – in other words, how much of your house you’ll actually own.

The Inputs

To calculate (and understand) the payments, gather the following information about a potential mortgage loan:

  • The loan amount (or principal)
  • The interest rate on the loan (not necessarily the APR, which also includes closing costs)
  • The number of years you have to repay (also known as the term)
  • The type of loan: fixed rate, interest only, etc.
  • The market value of the home
  • Your monthly income

Calculations for Different Loans

The calculation you use will depend on the type of loan you have. Most home loans are fixed-rate loans (for example, standard 30-year or 15-year mortgages).

For those loans, the formula is:

Loan Payment Amount / Discount Factor

You’ll use the following values:

Example: assume you borrow $100,000 at 6% for 30 years to be repaid monthly. What is the monthly payment (P)?

  • D 166.7916 ( <[(1 .005)^360] - 1>/ [.005(1 .005)^360])
  • P A / D 100,000 / 166.7916 599.55

How Much Goes Towards Interest?

Your mortgage payment is important, but you’ll also want to know how much you lose to interest each month. A portion of each monthly payment is your interest cost, and the remainder goes towards paying down your loan (you might also have taxes and insurance included in your monthly payment).

An amortization table can show you – month-by-month – exactly what happens with each payment. You can create an amortization table by hand, or use a free calculator or spreadsheet to do the job for you. Take a look at how much total interest you pay over the life of your loan. With that information, you can decide if you want to save money by:

  • Borrowing less
  • Paying extra each month
  • Finding a lower interest rate
  • Choosing a shorter term loan (15 years instead of 30 years, for example)

Interest Only Loan Payment Calculation Formula

Interest-only loans are much simpler to calculate. For better or worse, you don’t actually pay down the loan with each required payment (although you can usually pay extra each month if you want).

Example: assume you borrow $100,000 at 6% interest-only with monthly payments.

What is the payment (P)?

Loan Payment Amount x (Interest Rate / 12)

Check your math with the Interest Only Calculator.

Your interest only payment is $500, and it will remain the same until:

  1. You make additional payments (which will reduce your loan balance – but your required payment might not change right away), or
  2. After a certain number of years you’re required to start making amortizing payments, or
  3. You make a balloon payment to pay off the loan entirely

Figure Out How Much you Own (Equity)

You might also want to know how much of your home you actually own. Of course, you own the home but until it’s paid off, your lender has a lien on the property so it’s not free-and-clear. The amount that’s yours – your home equity – is the home’s market value minus any outstanding loan balance.

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There are several reasons you might want to calculate your equity.

Your loan to value (LTV) ratio is important because lenders look for a minimum ratio before approving loans. If you want to refinance or figure out how big your down payment needs to be, you need to know the LTV ratio.

Your net worth is based on how much of your home you actually own. Having a million dollar home doesn’t do you much good if you owe $999,999 on the property.

You can borrow against your home using second mortgages and home equity lines of credit (HELOCs). But most lenders need to see an LTV below 80% to approve a loan.

Can you Afford the Loan?

Lenders often offer you the largest loan that they’ll approve you for. This is typically based on their standards for an acceptable debt to income ratio. However, you don’t need to take the full amount – and it’s often a good idea to borrow less.

Before you apply for loans, look at your monthly budget and decide how much you’re comfortable spending on a mortgage payment. After you’ve made a decision, start talking to lenders and looking at debt to income ratios. If you do it the other way around, you might start shopping for more expensive homes (and you might even buy one – which will affect your budget and leave you vulnerable to surprises). It’s better to buy less and have some wiggle room than to suffer just to keep up with payments.

Mortgage Calculator: Calculate Your Monthly Mortgage Payment, how to calculate house payment.#How #to #calculate #house

Mortgage Calculator

  • Monthly Payment (Principal and Interest)

Mortgage calculator for your home loan

This mortgage calculator will show how much your monthly mortgage payment would be, including your amortization schedule. See how much you could save by prepaying some of the principal. Find out your home loan breakdown now by using this simple and free mortgage calculator.

NOTE: This calculator updates automatically as you move from field to field using the “tab” key. If you’re entering prepayment information, click the “calculate” button to see the final results.

A mortgage amortization calculator shows how much of your monthly mortgage payment will go toward principal and interest over the life of your loan. The loan calculator also lets you see how much you can save by prepaying some of the principal.

How to use the loan amortization calculator

With’s home loan calculator, you enter the features of your mortgage: amount of the principal loan balance, the interest rate, the home loan term, and the month and year the loan begins.

Your initial display will show you the monthly mortgage payment, total interest paid, breakout of principal and interest, and your mortgage payoff date.

Most of your mortgage loan payment will go toward interest in the early years of the loan, with a growing amount going toward the loan principal as the years go by – until finally almost all of your payment goes toward principal at the end. For instance, in the first year of a 30-year, $250,000 mortgage with a fixed 5% interest rate, $12,416.24 of your payments goes toward interest, and only $3,688.41 goes towards your principal. To see this, click on “Payment chart” and mouse over any year.

Clicking on “Amortization schedule” reveals a display table of the total principal and interest paid in each year of the mortgage and your remaining principal balance at the end of each calendar year. Clicking the “+” sign next to a year reveals a month-by-month breakdown of your costs.

Click “calculate” to get your monthly payment amount and an amortization schedule.

The effect of prepayments

Now use the mortgage loan calculator to see how prepaying some of the principal saves money over time. The calculator allows you to enter a monthly, annual, bi-weekly or one-time amount for additional principal prepayment.To do so, click “+ Prepayment options.”

Let’s say, for example, you want to pay an extra $50 a month. Using the $250,000 example above, enter “50” in the monthly principal prepayment field, then either hit “tab” or scroll down to click “calculate.” Initial results will be displayed under “Payment details,” and you can see further details in either the “Payment chart” or “Amortization schedule” tabs.

You may also target a certain loan term or monthly payment by using our mortgage prepayment calculator. Of course you’ll want to consult with your financial advisor about whether it’s best to prepay your mortgage or put that money toward something else, such as retirement. has developed a host of other free mortgage calculators to help answer your other questions, such as, “Can I qualify for a mortgage,” “Will prepaying my mortgage help me save money,” “How large of a down payment do I really need,” “What s the best way to pay for my refinance,” and “When will my home no longer be underwater?” See all of’s mortgage calculators.

This is the dollar amount of the mortgage you are borrowing. (Hitting “tab” after entering information in any field will automatically update the calculations.)

The loan’s interest rate. Along with the term, this is the key factor used by the mortgage payment calculator to determine what your monthly payment will be. To see where rates are right now, click on the “See today’s average rates” link to the right of the field, where you can also find offers from our advertising partners.

Mortgage loans come in a range of terms. Fixed rate mortgages are most often found in 30, 20, 15 and 10-year terms; Adjustable Rate Mortgages usually have total terms of 30 years, but the fixed interest rate period is much shorter than that, lasting from 1 to 10 years.

To get the most accurate calculations, use the month and year in which your very first mortgage payment was due (or will be due). If you don’t yet have a mortgage, the current month and year will work just fine.

This display shows the monthly mortgage payment, total interest paid, breakout of principal and interest, and your mortgage payoff date.

This display shows you the total principal and interest paid in each year of the mortgage and your remaining principal balance at the end of each calendar year.

While this display table also shows you the total principal and interest paid in each year of the mortgage and your remaining principal balance at the end of each calendar year, clicking the “+” sign next to a year reveals a month-by-month breakdown of your costs.

In this optional section, you can add in a regular monthly prepayment amount, re-set the calculator to show bi-weekly payments and savings, or even do a one-time prepayment to see how it affects the cost of your home loan.

How to calculate house payment

Mortgage Calculators: Amortization Tables, Accelerated Payments, Biweekly Payments, calculate mortgage payments.#Calculate #mortgage #payments

calculate mortgage payments

Calculate mortgage payments

Calculate mortgage payments

Calculate mortgage payments

Calculate mortgage payments

Lets you determine monthly mortgage payments and see complete amortization tables.

Calculate mortgage paymentsHow Advantageous Are Extra Payments?

By making additional monthly payments you will be able to repay your loan much more quickly. Find out how your monthly, yearly, or one-time pre-payments influence the loan term and the interest paid over the life of loan. Make additional 1/12 of monthly payments (a popular ‘do-it-yourself’ biweekly) or an additional monthly payment once a year.

Calculate mortgage paymentsSimple Option ARM Calculator

Computes minimum, interest-only and fully amortizing 30-, 15- and 40-year payments.

Calculate mortgage paymentsAdvanced Option ARM Calculator with Minimum Payment Change Cap

Allows you to create a complete option ARM loan amortization table (with standard and neg-am recasts, automatically estimated possible future index changes, various fixed payment periods, interest rate rounding to the nearest 1/8 of one percentage, and more). See what happens if you always select the minimum payment option.

< Please see: Using Pay Option ARM Calculator

Calculate mortgage paymentsWhich ARM Index Is Better?

Calculate mortgage paymentsMortgage Pre-Qualifier

Mortgage Pre-Qualifier will determine the income required to qualify for the particular loan using the specified qualifying ratios.

Calculate mortgage paymentsHow Much Can You Borrow?

The calculator lets you see how various changes to your income, liabilities, and mortgage terms affect the loan amount you can borrow.

Calculate mortgage paymentsBlended Rate Calculator

Calculates a first and second mortgage blended rate.

Calculate mortgage payments‘True bi-weekly’ payment calculator

Prints yearly amortization tables. With bi-weekly payments, you pay half of the monthly mortgage payment every 2 weeks, rather than the full balance once a month. This is comparable to 13 monthly payments a year, which can result in faster payoff and lower overall interest costs.

Calculate mortgage paymentsAnother ‘true bi-weekly’ payment calculator

Builds complete bi-weekly amortization tables.

Calculate mortgage paymentsTrue bi-weekly vs standard bi-weekly

Shows how much you will save if you calculate interest for two-week intervals and apply the bi-weekly payments less the interest to reduce principal every two weeks, instead of having your money withdrawn from your bank account every two weeks by your lender and making a full mortgage payment once a month plus one additional payment once a year out of a special account, managed by the lender. Complete amortization tables are available.

Calculate mortgage payments

Down Payment Calculator, Calculate Mortgage Down Payment, calculate house payment.#Calculate #house #payment

Mortgage Down Payment

A mortgage down payment is the amount of money you pay upfront when purchasing a home. A down payment, typically expressed as a percentage, is calculated as the dollar value of the down payment divided by the home price.


Renewal or Refinance

Select rate

Get a great mortgage with just 5% down

Have a 5% down payment? You re ready to go. Lock in a great mortgage before rates go up!

What is the minimum down payment required in Canada?

The minimum down payment in Canada depends on the purchase price of the home:

  • If the purchase price is less than $500,000, the minimum down payment is 5%.
  • If the purchase price is between $500,000 and $999,999, the minimum down payment is 5% of the first $500,000, and 10% of any amount over $500,000.
  • If the purchase price is $1,000,000 or more, the minimum down payment is 20%.

Mortgage default insurance, commonly referred to as CMHC insurance, protects the lender in the event the borrower defaults on the mortgage. It is required on all mortgages with down payments of less than 20%, which are known as high-ratio mortgages. A conventional mortgage, on the other hand, is one where the down payment is 20% or higher.

According to a recent TD Canada Trust Home Buyers Report 1 , 30% of homebuyers plan to or have at least a 20% down payment, the point at which mortgage default insurance is no longer required.

The size of your down payment influences three things

The amount you put down at the beginning of your mortgage shapes three important outputs over the life of the mortgage:

  • The home price you can afford
  • The size of your mortgage and monthly payment
  • The amount of CMHC insurance you pay

1. Your down payment influences the home price you can afford

Because the minimum down payment in Canada is 5%, this benchmark is used to determine your maximum affordability. Ignoring your income and debt levels, you can infer your maximum purchase price based on the size of your down payment. Because the minimum down payment is a sliding scale, the calculation depends on whether your down payment is more or less than $25,000.

If your down payment is $25,000 or less, your maximum home price would be: down payment amount / 5%. For example, if you have saved $25,000 for your down payment, the maximum home price you could afford would be $25,000 / 5% = $500,000.

If your down payment is $25,001 or more, the calculation is a bit more complex. You can find your maximum purchase price using: down payment amount – $25,000 / 10% + $500,000. For example, if you have saved $40,000 for your down payment, the maximum home price you could afford would be $40,000 – $25,000 = $15,000 / 10% = $150,000 + $500,000 = $650,000.

Naturally, as your affordability is also a function of your income and debt levels, you should visit our mortgage affordability calculator for a more detailed analysis.

2. Your down payment shapes the size of your mortgage and monthly payment

A larger down payment reduces the size of your mortgage, and, therefore, the monthly payment and interest you will pay over the life of your mortgage.

3. Your down payment determines the amount of CMHC insurance you pay

Your CMHC insurance premium, calculated as a percent of your mortgage amount, gets smaller as you increase your down payment. To learn more about CMHC insurance and how it is calculated, please visit our CMHC insurance page.

Mortgage Calculator Canada, Calculate Mortgage Payment, how to calculate mortgage payment.#How #to #calculate #mortgage #payment

Mortgage Payment Calculator Canada

Our mortgage payment calculator calculates your monthly payment and shows you the corresponding amortization schedule. If you are purchasing a home, our payment calculator allows you to test down payment and amortization scenarios, and compare variable and fixed mortgage rates. We also help you calculate CMHC insurance and land transfer tax.


Renewal or Refinance

Select rate

Make your calculator results reality

Secure a great mortgage rate and lock in your monthly mortgage payment now.

How to estimate mortgage payments

There are a number of factors that go into estimating how much your regular mortgage payments will be. The most important numbers are the total mortgage amount (the price of the home, less the down payment, plus mortgage insurance if applicable), the amortization period (the number of years the mortgage payments will be spread across), and the mortgage rate (the rate of interest paid on the mortgage).

To use the calculator, enter the purchase price, and select your amortization period and mortgage rate. Then you can see how your payment will be affected by the size of your down payment and frequency of payments. Our calculator also shows you what the land transfer tax will be, and approximately how much cash you’ll need for closing costs. You can also use the calculator to estimate your total monthly expenses, see what your payments will be if mortgage rates go up, and show what your outstanding balance will be over time. It is a good idea to use the calculator to determine what you can afford before you start looking at real estate listings.

If you’re renewing or refinancing and know the total amount of the mortgage, use the “Renewal or Refinance” tab to estimate mortgage payments without accounting for a down payment.

How to lower your mortgage payments

There are a few ways to lower your monthly mortgage payments. You can reduce the purchase price, make a bigger down payment, extend the amortization period (if your down payment is less than 20%, the maximum is 25 years), or choose a lower mortgage rate. Use the calculator above to try different variables to see what your payment will be with different scenarios.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is your mortgage payment calculator free?

Absolutely! Our calculators, website and rate comparisons are completely free for users. earns revenue through advertising. We promote the lowest rates in each province offered by brokers, and allow them to reach customers online.

Why does your monthly calculator have four columns?

We think it’s important for you to compare your options side by side. We start the calculator by outlining the four most common options for down payment scenarios, but you are not limited to those options. We also allow you to vary amortization period as well as interest rates, so you’ll know how a variable vs. fixed mortgage rate changes your payment.

How do payments differ by province in Canada?

While majority of the mortgage regulation in Canada is consistent across the provinces (minimum down payment 5%; maximum amortization period 35 years), there are some things that do vary. This table summarizes the differences: