Applying for a Mortgage after a Bankruptcy #home #refinance #calculator


#bankruptcy mortgage lenders

#

Applying for a Mortgage after a Bankruptcy

Qualifying for a home mortgage with a bankruptcy on your credit history requires time and money. Yet by understanding the requirements to get a mortgage after a bankruptcy and by carefully rebuilding your credit standing, you can apply for a loan and buy a home.

The three main U.S. credit bureaus–Equifax, Experian and TransUnion–maintain your credit history. Using that history, plus its own proprietary equation, the Fair Isaac Corp. calculates your FICO credit score somewhere between 850 and 300 points. Anything above 700 points is good to excellent, with 720 or above earning you lower interest rates. Below 620 points is considered poor.

Impact of a Bankruptcy

A bankruptcy makes a major impact on your credit score and makes it much more difficult to qualify for a home mortgage. First, you can expect a drop of 100 or more points. That immediately takes you from excellent to poor. Then a record of the bankruptcy stays on your credit history for 10 years. A foreclosure stays on for seven years. Other negative information such as a late payment stays on for three years.

While obtaining a home mortgage with a bankruptcy on your record is difficult, you don t have to wait 10 years to begin making a difference.

After you have filed for bankruptcy protection or liquidation, you will wait four years before a traditional mortgage lender will qualify you for a home loan with market interest rates. And that will happen then only if you have taken steps to improve your credit and are in a good enough financial position to handle the loan.

Two years after a bankruptcy filing, you can apply for a Federal Housing Administration-backed loan. FHA loans have slightly higher interest rates than market-rate loans. However, you might have to come up with less money down.

Hard money lenders will consider offering a home mortgage six months after your bankruptcy, but interest rates are very high and the down payment can be in the 30 percent range.

No matter what avenue you pursue to get a home mortgage with a bankruptcy filing in your past, you should begin immediately after the filing to repair your credit score. Remember that most negative information falls off your report after three years, so your score could be improving right away.

Do not make multiple credit applications, even if you can qualify for loans or credit cards. Multiple applications push your score down.

Do try to get a secured credit card, but make certain the card issuer reports to the credit bureaus. And be absolutely certain to pay your bill on time.

An installment loan from a retailer can help you establish a good track record. Showing that you have been able to save on your current income will not only help you accrue a down payment, but you will also demonstrate to the lender your ability to manage your finances.

Consider alternatives to traditional home mortgages with a bankruptcy on your record. Seller financing can be an option at any time. This is often a far more flexible arrangement. Plus, if you include this provision in your seller-financed loan agreement, you can convert to a traditional loan as you are able to qualify for it.

More Articles

CHECK MORTGAGE RATES


Applying for a Mortgage after a Bankruptcy #mortgage #payment #calculator #with #taxes


#bankruptcy mortgage lenders

#

Applying for a Mortgage after a Bankruptcy

Qualifying for a home mortgage with a bankruptcy on your credit history requires time and money. Yet by understanding the requirements to get a mortgage after a bankruptcy and by carefully rebuilding your credit standing, you can apply for a loan and buy a home.

The three main U.S. credit bureaus–Equifax, Experian and TransUnion–maintain your credit history. Using that history, plus its own proprietary equation, the Fair Isaac Corp. calculates your FICO credit score somewhere between 850 and 300 points. Anything above 700 points is good to excellent, with 720 or above earning you lower interest rates. Below 620 points is considered poor.

Impact of a Bankruptcy

A bankruptcy makes a major impact on your credit score and makes it much more difficult to qualify for a home mortgage. First, you can expect a drop of 100 or more points. That immediately takes you from excellent to poor. Then a record of the bankruptcy stays on your credit history for 10 years. A foreclosure stays on for seven years. Other negative information such as a late payment stays on for three years.

While obtaining a home mortgage with a bankruptcy on your record is difficult, you don t have to wait 10 years to begin making a difference.

After you have filed for bankruptcy protection or liquidation, you will wait four years before a traditional mortgage lender will qualify you for a home loan with market interest rates. And that will happen then only if you have taken steps to improve your credit and are in a good enough financial position to handle the loan.

Two years after a bankruptcy filing, you can apply for a Federal Housing Administration-backed loan. FHA loans have slightly higher interest rates than market-rate loans. However, you might have to come up with less money down.

Hard money lenders will consider offering a home mortgage six months after your bankruptcy, but interest rates are very high and the down payment can be in the 30 percent range.

No matter what avenue you pursue to get a home mortgage with a bankruptcy filing in your past, you should begin immediately after the filing to repair your credit score. Remember that most negative information falls off your report after three years, so your score could be improving right away.

Do not make multiple credit applications, even if you can qualify for loans or credit cards. Multiple applications push your score down.

Do try to get a secured credit card, but make certain the card issuer reports to the credit bureaus. And be absolutely certain to pay your bill on time.

An installment loan from a retailer can help you establish a good track record. Showing that you have been able to save on your current income will not only help you accrue a down payment, but you will also demonstrate to the lender your ability to manage your finances.

Consider alternatives to traditional home mortgages with a bankruptcy on your record. Seller financing can be an option at any time. This is often a far more flexible arrangement. Plus, if you include this provision in your seller-financed loan agreement, you can convert to a traditional loan as you are able to qualify for it.

More Articles

CHECK MORTGAGE RATES


What to Expect when Applying for a Commercial Mortgage Loan: Part 1 #home #mortgage #refinancing


#commercial mortgage

#

What to Expect when Applying for a Commercial Mortgage Loan:
Banks and Private Alternatives
Part 1

If you have never borrowed money for your business before, you may be in for a surprise. Whether you want to borrow working capital to expand your business or leverage equity in a commercial real estate venture, you will soon find out the commercial loan process is very different from the more common home mortgage process. Commercial loans, unlike the vast majority of residential mortgages, are not ultimately backed by a governmental entity such as Fannie Mae. Consequently, most commercial lenders are risk-averse; they charge higher interests rate than on a comparable home loan. Some lenders go a step further, scrutinizing the borrower’s business as well as the commercial property that will serve as collateral for the loan. This means that the business borrower should have different expectations when applying for a loan against his commercial property than he would have for a loan secured by his or her primary residence.

Following is a list of questions the borrower should ask himself and the lender before applying for a commercial loan.

1. How am I going to meet the loan repayment terms?

Typically, bank loans require the borrower to repay his or her entire business loan much earlier than its stated due date. Banks do this by requiring most of their loans to include a balloon repayment. This means the borrower will pay interest and principal on his 30-year mortgage at the stated interest rate for the first few years (generally 3, 5 or 10 years) and then repay the entire balance in one balloon payment.

Many borrowers do not save enough in such a short time frame, so they must either re-qualify for their loan or refinance the loan at the end of the balloon term. If the business happens to have any cash-flow problems in the years immediately preceding the balloon term, the lender may require a higher interest rate, or the borrower may not qualify for a loan at all. If this happens, the borrower runs the risk of being turned down for financing altogether and the property may be in jeopardy of foreclosure.

A balloon loan has other risks as well. If the borrower’s business is in a “risky” industry at the time the balloon is due (think of the oil and gas bust in the 1980s or the telecom implosion of the 2000s), the lender may back out of all refinancing for the enterprise. Alternatively, a lender simply may decide its loan portfolio has too many loans in a given industry, so he will deny future refinancing within that trade.

Non-bank lenders generally offer less stringent credit requirements for commercial loans. Some non-bank lenders will make long-term commercial loans without requiring the early balloon repayment. These loans, which may carry a slightly higher interest rate, work like a typical home loan. They allow a steady repayment over twenty or thirty years. It is often worth paying a one- or two-point higher interest rate for a fixed-term loan in order to ensure the security of a long-term loan commitment.

2. How much can or should I borrow?

Most bank loans prohibit second mortgages, so the borrower should go into the loan process intending to borrow enough to meet current business needs, or enough to sufficiently leverage real estate investments. For a traditional acquisition loan in which the borrower is buying a new property, banks usually require a down payment of 20-25%. So for a $600,000 acquisition, the borrower will need to come up with $120,000-$150,000 for the down payment.

Some non-traditional loans will allow the borrower to make a smaller down payment, maximizing the loan-to-value (LTV) at 85-90%. Such loans are generally not bank loans, but are offered by direct commercial lenders or pools of commercial investors. If the customer wants to borrow the maximum amount possible, the interest rate on such loans may be a point or two higher than typical bank loans. Before deciding how much to borrow, potential borrowers should:

  • Evaluate how much cash they are likely to need
  • Analyze their ability to repay the loan as it is structured

Research has consistently shown that the number one reason behind the failures of most small businesses is the lack of adequate capital to meet cash-flow needs. Because of this it may actually be safer for a small business to leave a larger cushion against unforeseen events by borrowing more money at the slightly higher rate.

The amount of the loan requested has an effect on which commercial lenders will fund the loan. Small businesses borrowing less than $2,000,000 will visit a different pool of potential lenders than those seeking loans of over $5 million. Small business loans are generally made by direct commercial lenders (easily located by internet searches) or by small local banks. Larger loans are generally made by regional banks, and very large loans are made by mega-banks or Wall Street lenders.


Applying for a Mortgage after a Bankruptcy #mortgage #calculator #with #amortization #table


#bankruptcy mortgage lenders

#

Applying for a Mortgage after a Bankruptcy

Qualifying for a home mortgage with a bankruptcy on your credit history requires time and money. Yet by understanding the requirements to get a mortgage after a bankruptcy and by carefully rebuilding your credit standing, you can apply for a loan and buy a home.

The three main U.S. credit bureaus–Equifax, Experian and TransUnion–maintain your credit history. Using that history, plus its own proprietary equation, the Fair Isaac Corp. calculates your FICO credit score somewhere between 850 and 300 points. Anything above 700 points is good to excellent, with 720 or above earning you lower interest rates. Below 620 points is considered poor.

Impact of a Bankruptcy

A bankruptcy makes a major impact on your credit score and makes it much more difficult to qualify for a home mortgage. First, you can expect a drop of 100 or more points. That immediately takes you from excellent to poor. Then a record of the bankruptcy stays on your credit history for 10 years. A foreclosure stays on for seven years. Other negative information such as a late payment stays on for three years.

While obtaining a home mortgage with a bankruptcy on your record is difficult, you don t have to wait 10 years to begin making a difference.

After you have filed for bankruptcy protection or liquidation, you will wait four years before a traditional mortgage lender will qualify you for a home loan with market interest rates. And that will happen then only if you have taken steps to improve your credit and are in a good enough financial position to handle the loan.

Two years after a bankruptcy filing, you can apply for a Federal Housing Administration-backed loan. FHA loans have slightly higher interest rates than market-rate loans. However, you might have to come up with less money down.

Hard money lenders will consider offering a home mortgage six months after your bankruptcy, but interest rates are very high and the down payment can be in the 30 percent range.

No matter what avenue you pursue to get a home mortgage with a bankruptcy filing in your past, you should begin immediately after the filing to repair your credit score. Remember that most negative information falls off your report after three years, so your score could be improving right away.

Do not make multiple credit applications, even if you can qualify for loans or credit cards. Multiple applications push your score down.

Do try to get a secured credit card, but make certain the card issuer reports to the credit bureaus. And be absolutely certain to pay your bill on time.

An installment loan from a retailer can help you establish a good track record. Showing that you have been able to save on your current income will not only help you accrue a down payment, but you will also demonstrate to the lender your ability to manage your finances.

Consider alternatives to traditional home mortgages with a bankruptcy on your record. Seller financing can be an option at any time. This is often a far more flexible arrangement. Plus, if you include this provision in your seller-financed loan agreement, you can convert to a traditional loan as you are able to qualify for it.

More Articles

CHECK MORTGAGE RATES


What to Expect when Applying for a Commercial Mortgage Loan: Part 1 #refinance #mortgage #calculator


#commercial mortgage

#

What to Expect when Applying for a Commercial Mortgage Loan:
Banks and Private Alternatives
Part 1

If you have never borrowed money for your business before, you may be in for a surprise. Whether you want to borrow working capital to expand your business or leverage equity in a commercial real estate venture, you will soon find out the commercial loan process is very different from the more common home mortgage process. Commercial loans, unlike the vast majority of residential mortgages, are not ultimately backed by a governmental entity such as Fannie Mae. Consequently, most commercial lenders are risk-averse; they charge higher interests rate than on a comparable home loan. Some lenders go a step further, scrutinizing the borrower’s business as well as the commercial property that will serve as collateral for the loan. This means that the business borrower should have different expectations when applying for a loan against his commercial property than he would have for a loan secured by his or her primary residence.

Following is a list of questions the borrower should ask himself and the lender before applying for a commercial loan.

1. How am I going to meet the loan repayment terms?

Typically, bank loans require the borrower to repay his or her entire business loan much earlier than its stated due date. Banks do this by requiring most of their loans to include a balloon repayment. This means the borrower will pay interest and principal on his 30-year mortgage at the stated interest rate for the first few years (generally 3, 5 or 10 years) and then repay the entire balance in one balloon payment.

Many borrowers do not save enough in such a short time frame, so they must either re-qualify for their loan or refinance the loan at the end of the balloon term. If the business happens to have any cash-flow problems in the years immediately preceding the balloon term, the lender may require a higher interest rate, or the borrower may not qualify for a loan at all. If this happens, the borrower runs the risk of being turned down for financing altogether and the property may be in jeopardy of foreclosure.

A balloon loan has other risks as well. If the borrower’s business is in a “risky” industry at the time the balloon is due (think of the oil and gas bust in the 1980s or the telecom implosion of the 2000s), the lender may back out of all refinancing for the enterprise. Alternatively, a lender simply may decide its loan portfolio has too many loans in a given industry, so he will deny future refinancing within that trade.

Non-bank lenders generally offer less stringent credit requirements for commercial loans. Some non-bank lenders will make long-term commercial loans without requiring the early balloon repayment. These loans, which may carry a slightly higher interest rate, work like a typical home loan. They allow a steady repayment over twenty or thirty years. It is often worth paying a one- or two-point higher interest rate for a fixed-term loan in order to ensure the security of a long-term loan commitment.

2. How much can or should I borrow?

Most bank loans prohibit second mortgages, so the borrower should go into the loan process intending to borrow enough to meet current business needs, or enough to sufficiently leverage real estate investments. For a traditional acquisition loan in which the borrower is buying a new property, banks usually require a down payment of 20-25%. So for a $600,000 acquisition, the borrower will need to come up with $120,000-$150,000 for the down payment.

Some non-traditional loans will allow the borrower to make a smaller down payment, maximizing the loan-to-value (LTV) at 85-90%. Such loans are generally not bank loans, but are offered by direct commercial lenders or pools of commercial investors. If the customer wants to borrow the maximum amount possible, the interest rate on such loans may be a point or two higher than typical bank loans. Before deciding how much to borrow, potential borrowers should:

  • Evaluate how much cash they are likely to need
  • Analyze their ability to repay the loan as it is structured

Research has consistently shown that the number one reason behind the failures of most small businesses is the lack of adequate capital to meet cash-flow needs. Because of this it may actually be safer for a small business to leave a larger cushion against unforeseen events by borrowing more money at the slightly higher rate.

The amount of the loan requested has an effect on which commercial lenders will fund the loan. Small businesses borrowing less than $2,000,000 will visit a different pool of potential lenders than those seeking loans of over $5 million. Small business loans are generally made by direct commercial lenders (easily located by internet searches) or by small local banks. Larger loans are generally made by regional banks, and very large loans are made by mega-banks or Wall Street lenders.


Applying for a Mortgage after a Bankruptcy #nfcu #mortgage #rates


#bankruptcy mortgage lenders

#

Applying for a Mortgage after a Bankruptcy

Qualifying for a home mortgage with a bankruptcy on your credit history requires time and money. Yet by understanding the requirements to get a mortgage after a bankruptcy and by carefully rebuilding your credit standing, you can apply for a loan and buy a home.

The three main U.S. credit bureaus–Equifax, Experian and TransUnion–maintain your credit history. Using that history, plus its own proprietary equation, the Fair Isaac Corp. calculates your FICO credit score somewhere between 850 and 300 points. Anything above 700 points is good to excellent, with 720 or above earning you lower interest rates. Below 620 points is considered poor.

Impact of a Bankruptcy

A bankruptcy makes a major impact on your credit score and makes it much more difficult to qualify for a home mortgage. First, you can expect a drop of 100 or more points. That immediately takes you from excellent to poor. Then a record of the bankruptcy stays on your credit history for 10 years. A foreclosure stays on for seven years. Other negative information such as a late payment stays on for three years.

While obtaining a home mortgage with a bankruptcy on your record is difficult, you don t have to wait 10 years to begin making a difference.

After you have filed for bankruptcy protection or liquidation, you will wait four years before a traditional mortgage lender will qualify you for a home loan with market interest rates. And that will happen then only if you have taken steps to improve your credit and are in a good enough financial position to handle the loan.

Two years after a bankruptcy filing, you can apply for a Federal Housing Administration-backed loan. FHA loans have slightly higher interest rates than market-rate loans. However, you might have to come up with less money down.

Hard money lenders will consider offering a home mortgage six months after your bankruptcy, but interest rates are very high and the down payment can be in the 30 percent range.

No matter what avenue you pursue to get a home mortgage with a bankruptcy filing in your past, you should begin immediately after the filing to repair your credit score. Remember that most negative information falls off your report after three years, so your score could be improving right away.

Do not make multiple credit applications, even if you can qualify for loans or credit cards. Multiple applications push your score down.

Do try to get a secured credit card, but make certain the card issuer reports to the credit bureaus. And be absolutely certain to pay your bill on time.

An installment loan from a retailer can help you establish a good track record. Showing that you have been able to save on your current income will not only help you accrue a down payment, but you will also demonstrate to the lender your ability to manage your finances.

Consider alternatives to traditional home mortgages with a bankruptcy on your record. Seller financing can be an option at any time. This is often a far more flexible arrangement. Plus, if you include this provision in your seller-financed loan agreement, you can convert to a traditional loan as you are able to qualify for it.

More Articles

CHECK MORTGAGE RATES


What to Expect when Applying for a Commercial Mortgage Loan: Part 1 #federal #home #loan


#commercial mortgage

#

What to Expect when Applying for a Commercial Mortgage Loan:
Banks and Private Alternatives
Part 1

If you have never borrowed money for your business before, you may be in for a surprise. Whether you want to borrow working capital to expand your business or leverage equity in a commercial real estate venture, you will soon find out the commercial loan process is very different from the more common home mortgage process. Commercial loans, unlike the vast majority of residential mortgages, are not ultimately backed by a governmental entity such as Fannie Mae. Consequently, most commercial lenders are risk-averse; they charge higher interests rate than on a comparable home loan. Some lenders go a step further, scrutinizing the borrower’s business as well as the commercial property that will serve as collateral for the loan. This means that the business borrower should have different expectations when applying for a loan against his commercial property than he would have for a loan secured by his or her primary residence.

Following is a list of questions the borrower should ask himself and the lender before applying for a commercial loan.

1. How am I going to meet the loan repayment terms?

Typically, bank loans require the borrower to repay his or her entire business loan much earlier than its stated due date. Banks do this by requiring most of their loans to include a balloon repayment. This means the borrower will pay interest and principal on his 30-year mortgage at the stated interest rate for the first few years (generally 3, 5 or 10 years) and then repay the entire balance in one balloon payment.

Many borrowers do not save enough in such a short time frame, so they must either re-qualify for their loan or refinance the loan at the end of the balloon term. If the business happens to have any cash-flow problems in the years immediately preceding the balloon term, the lender may require a higher interest rate, or the borrower may not qualify for a loan at all. If this happens, the borrower runs the risk of being turned down for financing altogether and the property may be in jeopardy of foreclosure.

A balloon loan has other risks as well. If the borrower’s business is in a “risky” industry at the time the balloon is due (think of the oil and gas bust in the 1980s or the telecom implosion of the 2000s), the lender may back out of all refinancing for the enterprise. Alternatively, a lender simply may decide its loan portfolio has too many loans in a given industry, so he will deny future refinancing within that trade.

Non-bank lenders generally offer less stringent credit requirements for commercial loans. Some non-bank lenders will make long-term commercial loans without requiring the early balloon repayment. These loans, which may carry a slightly higher interest rate, work like a typical home loan. They allow a steady repayment over twenty or thirty years. It is often worth paying a one- or two-point higher interest rate for a fixed-term loan in order to ensure the security of a long-term loan commitment.

2. How much can or should I borrow?

Most bank loans prohibit second mortgages, so the borrower should go into the loan process intending to borrow enough to meet current business needs, or enough to sufficiently leverage real estate investments. For a traditional acquisition loan in which the borrower is buying a new property, banks usually require a down payment of 20-25%. So for a $600,000 acquisition, the borrower will need to come up with $120,000-$150,000 for the down payment.

Some non-traditional loans will allow the borrower to make a smaller down payment, maximizing the loan-to-value (LTV) at 85-90%. Such loans are generally not bank loans, but are offered by direct commercial lenders or pools of commercial investors. If the customer wants to borrow the maximum amount possible, the interest rate on such loans may be a point or two higher than typical bank loans. Before deciding how much to borrow, potential borrowers should:

  • Evaluate how much cash they are likely to need
  • Analyze their ability to repay the loan as it is structured

Research has consistently shown that the number one reason behind the failures of most small businesses is the lack of adequate capital to meet cash-flow needs. Because of this it may actually be safer for a small business to leave a larger cushion against unforeseen events by borrowing more money at the slightly higher rate.

The amount of the loan requested has an effect on which commercial lenders will fund the loan. Small businesses borrowing less than $2,000,000 will visit a different pool of potential lenders than those seeking loans of over $5 million. Small business loans are generally made by direct commercial lenders (easily located by internet searches) or by small local banks. Larger loans are generally made by regional banks, and very large loans are made by mega-banks or Wall Street lenders.


What to Expect when Applying for a Commercial Mortgage Loan: Part 1 #mortgage #refi #rates


#commercial mortgage

#

What to Expect when Applying for a Commercial Mortgage Loan:
Banks and Private Alternatives
Part 1

If you have never borrowed money for your business before, you may be in for a surprise. Whether you want to borrow working capital to expand your business or leverage equity in a commercial real estate venture, you will soon find out the commercial loan process is very different from the more common home mortgage process. Commercial loans, unlike the vast majority of residential mortgages, are not ultimately backed by a governmental entity such as Fannie Mae. Consequently, most commercial lenders are risk-averse; they charge higher interests rate than on a comparable home loan. Some lenders go a step further, scrutinizing the borrower’s business as well as the commercial property that will serve as collateral for the loan. This means that the business borrower should have different expectations when applying for a loan against his commercial property than he would have for a loan secured by his or her primary residence.

Following is a list of questions the borrower should ask himself and the lender before applying for a commercial loan.

1. How am I going to meet the loan repayment terms?

Typically, bank loans require the borrower to repay his or her entire business loan much earlier than its stated due date. Banks do this by requiring most of their loans to include a balloon repayment. This means the borrower will pay interest and principal on his 30-year mortgage at the stated interest rate for the first few years (generally 3, 5 or 10 years) and then repay the entire balance in one balloon payment.

Many borrowers do not save enough in such a short time frame, so they must either re-qualify for their loan or refinance the loan at the end of the balloon term. If the business happens to have any cash-flow problems in the years immediately preceding the balloon term, the lender may require a higher interest rate, or the borrower may not qualify for a loan at all. If this happens, the borrower runs the risk of being turned down for financing altogether and the property may be in jeopardy of foreclosure.

A balloon loan has other risks as well. If the borrower’s business is in a “risky” industry at the time the balloon is due (think of the oil and gas bust in the 1980s or the telecom implosion of the 2000s), the lender may back out of all refinancing for the enterprise. Alternatively, a lender simply may decide its loan portfolio has too many loans in a given industry, so he will deny future refinancing within that trade.

Non-bank lenders generally offer less stringent credit requirements for commercial loans. Some non-bank lenders will make long-term commercial loans without requiring the early balloon repayment. These loans, which may carry a slightly higher interest rate, work like a typical home loan. They allow a steady repayment over twenty or thirty years. It is often worth paying a one- or two-point higher interest rate for a fixed-term loan in order to ensure the security of a long-term loan commitment.

2. How much can or should I borrow?

Most bank loans prohibit second mortgages, so the borrower should go into the loan process intending to borrow enough to meet current business needs, or enough to sufficiently leverage real estate investments. For a traditional acquisition loan in which the borrower is buying a new property, banks usually require a down payment of 20-25%. So for a $600,000 acquisition, the borrower will need to come up with $120,000-$150,000 for the down payment.

Some non-traditional loans will allow the borrower to make a smaller down payment, maximizing the loan-to-value (LTV) at 85-90%. Such loans are generally not bank loans, but are offered by direct commercial lenders or pools of commercial investors. If the customer wants to borrow the maximum amount possible, the interest rate on such loans may be a point or two higher than typical bank loans. Before deciding how much to borrow, potential borrowers should:

  • Evaluate how much cash they are likely to need
  • Analyze their ability to repay the loan as it is structured

Research has consistently shown that the number one reason behind the failures of most small businesses is the lack of adequate capital to meet cash-flow needs. Because of this it may actually be safer for a small business to leave a larger cushion against unforeseen events by borrowing more money at the slightly higher rate.

The amount of the loan requested has an effect on which commercial lenders will fund the loan. Small businesses borrowing less than $2,000,000 will visit a different pool of potential lenders than those seeking loans of over $5 million. Small business loans are generally made by direct commercial lenders (easily located by internet searches) or by small local banks. Larger loans are generally made by regional banks, and very large loans are made by mega-banks or Wall Street lenders.


Applying for a Mortgage after a Bankruptcy #bank #america #mortgage


#bankruptcy mortgage lenders

#

Applying for a Mortgage after a Bankruptcy

Qualifying for a home mortgage with a bankruptcy on your credit history requires time and money. Yet by understanding the requirements to get a mortgage after a bankruptcy and by carefully rebuilding your credit standing, you can apply for a loan and buy a home.

The three main U.S. credit bureaus–Equifax, Experian and TransUnion–maintain your credit history. Using that history, plus its own proprietary equation, the Fair Isaac Corp. calculates your FICO credit score somewhere between 850 and 300 points. Anything above 700 points is good to excellent, with 720 or above earning you lower interest rates. Below 620 points is considered poor.

Impact of a Bankruptcy

A bankruptcy makes a major impact on your credit score and makes it much more difficult to qualify for a home mortgage. First, you can expect a drop of 100 or more points. That immediately takes you from excellent to poor. Then a record of the bankruptcy stays on your credit history for 10 years. A foreclosure stays on for seven years. Other negative information such as a late payment stays on for three years.

While obtaining a home mortgage with a bankruptcy on your record is difficult, you don t have to wait 10 years to begin making a difference.

After you have filed for bankruptcy protection or liquidation, you will wait four years before a traditional mortgage lender will qualify you for a home loan with market interest rates. And that will happen then only if you have taken steps to improve your credit and are in a good enough financial position to handle the loan.

Two years after a bankruptcy filing, you can apply for a Federal Housing Administration-backed loan. FHA loans have slightly higher interest rates than market-rate loans. However, you might have to come up with less money down.

Hard money lenders will consider offering a home mortgage six months after your bankruptcy, but interest rates are very high and the down payment can be in the 30 percent range.

No matter what avenue you pursue to get a home mortgage with a bankruptcy filing in your past, you should begin immediately after the filing to repair your credit score. Remember that most negative information falls off your report after three years, so your score could be improving right away.

Do not make multiple credit applications, even if you can qualify for loans or credit cards. Multiple applications push your score down.

Do try to get a secured credit card, but make certain the card issuer reports to the credit bureaus. And be absolutely certain to pay your bill on time.

An installment loan from a retailer can help you establish a good track record. Showing that you have been able to save on your current income will not only help you accrue a down payment, but you will also demonstrate to the lender your ability to manage your finances.

Consider alternatives to traditional home mortgages with a bankruptcy on your record. Seller financing can be an option at any time. This is often a far more flexible arrangement. Plus, if you include this provision in your seller-financed loan agreement, you can convert to a traditional loan as you are able to qualify for it.

More Articles

CHECK MORTGAGE RATES


What to Expect when Applying for a Commercial Mortgage Loan: Part 1 #mortgage #calculator #refinance


#commercial mortgage

#

What to Expect when Applying for a Commercial Mortgage Loan:
Banks and Private Alternatives
Part 1

If you have never borrowed money for your business before, you may be in for a surprise. Whether you want to borrow working capital to expand your business or leverage equity in a commercial real estate venture, you will soon find out the commercial loan process is very different from the more common home mortgage process. Commercial loans, unlike the vast majority of residential mortgages, are not ultimately backed by a governmental entity such as Fannie Mae. Consequently, most commercial lenders are risk-averse; they charge higher interests rate than on a comparable home loan. Some lenders go a step further, scrutinizing the borrower’s business as well as the commercial property that will serve as collateral for the loan. This means that the business borrower should have different expectations when applying for a loan against his commercial property than he would have for a loan secured by his or her primary residence.

Following is a list of questions the borrower should ask himself and the lender before applying for a commercial loan.

1. How am I going to meet the loan repayment terms?

Typically, bank loans require the borrower to repay his or her entire business loan much earlier than its stated due date. Banks do this by requiring most of their loans to include a balloon repayment. This means the borrower will pay interest and principal on his 30-year mortgage at the stated interest rate for the first few years (generally 3, 5 or 10 years) and then repay the entire balance in one balloon payment.

Many borrowers do not save enough in such a short time frame, so they must either re-qualify for their loan or refinance the loan at the end of the balloon term. If the business happens to have any cash-flow problems in the years immediately preceding the balloon term, the lender may require a higher interest rate, or the borrower may not qualify for a loan at all. If this happens, the borrower runs the risk of being turned down for financing altogether and the property may be in jeopardy of foreclosure.

A balloon loan has other risks as well. If the borrower’s business is in a “risky” industry at the time the balloon is due (think of the oil and gas bust in the 1980s or the telecom implosion of the 2000s), the lender may back out of all refinancing for the enterprise. Alternatively, a lender simply may decide its loan portfolio has too many loans in a given industry, so he will deny future refinancing within that trade.

Non-bank lenders generally offer less stringent credit requirements for commercial loans. Some non-bank lenders will make long-term commercial loans without requiring the early balloon repayment. These loans, which may carry a slightly higher interest rate, work like a typical home loan. They allow a steady repayment over twenty or thirty years. It is often worth paying a one- or two-point higher interest rate for a fixed-term loan in order to ensure the security of a long-term loan commitment.

2. How much can or should I borrow?

Most bank loans prohibit second mortgages, so the borrower should go into the loan process intending to borrow enough to meet current business needs, or enough to sufficiently leverage real estate investments. For a traditional acquisition loan in which the borrower is buying a new property, banks usually require a down payment of 20-25%. So for a $600,000 acquisition, the borrower will need to come up with $120,000-$150,000 for the down payment.

Some non-traditional loans will allow the borrower to make a smaller down payment, maximizing the loan-to-value (LTV) at 85-90%. Such loans are generally not bank loans, but are offered by direct commercial lenders or pools of commercial investors. If the customer wants to borrow the maximum amount possible, the interest rate on such loans may be a point or two higher than typical bank loans. Before deciding how much to borrow, potential borrowers should:

  • Evaluate how much cash they are likely to need
  • Analyze their ability to repay the loan as it is structured

Research has consistently shown that the number one reason behind the failures of most small businesses is the lack of adequate capital to meet cash-flow needs. Because of this it may actually be safer for a small business to leave a larger cushion against unforeseen events by borrowing more money at the slightly higher rate.

The amount of the loan requested has an effect on which commercial lenders will fund the loan. Small businesses borrowing less than $2,000,000 will visit a different pool of potential lenders than those seeking loans of over $5 million. Small business loans are generally made by direct commercial lenders (easily located by internet searches) or by small local banks. Larger loans are generally made by regional banks, and very large loans are made by mega-banks or Wall Street lenders.