CBC News – Interest rates are about to go up in Canada – no, for


Historical interest rates

Bank of Canada may hike interest rate for 1st time in 7 years next week

Posted:Jul 03, 2017 5:00 AM ET

Historical interest rates

The Bank of Canada has held its benchmark rate steady since September 2010. Chris Wattie/Reuters

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After almost a decade of warnings that never came to pass, it appears as though the Bank of Canada is ramping up to hike its benchmark interest rate — possibly as soon as next week.

On July 12, Canada’s central bank will announce its latest decision on where to place its trend-setting interest rate, which has an impact on the rates that Canadian borrowers and savers get for their bank accounts, mortgages and other products.

Eight times a year, the bank’s board of governors meets to assess the latest economic indicators and decide whether Canada’s economy needs a shot in the arm from a rate cut, or a pump of the brakes by way of a hike.

And for the first time in 54 such meetings, it’s looking like the latter is in order.

It’s not like there haven’t been warning signs. By the time Stephen Poloz was named to replace Mark Carney atop the bank in 2013, the central bank had already been on the sidelines for more than two years, its benchmark interest rate set at one per cent.

Historical interest rates

Since Stephen Poloz, right, took over the helm of the Bank of Canada from Mark Carney, left, in 2013, the bank has yet to raise interest rates. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)

But even as the bank kept loans cheap coming out of the financial crisis, the messaging from the top came early and often that Canadians should be forewarned — rates have to go up eventually.

As far back as 2014 Poloz warned Canadians that rates would rise “soon” — before oil’s plunge in 2015 caused the bank to lose its nerve. Instead, the central bank moved in the opposite direction, cutting rates twice that year to bring its rate to 0.5 per cent, where it currently sits.

At the time, those hikes were described as a temporary measure to help a Canadian economy that had been waylaid by an oil price that lost more than 70 per cent of its value in a matter of months. But in recent weeks the bank has started leaving clear signals that despite oil still being in the $40-per-barrel range, those temporary conditions are over and it’s time for a return to normalcy.

It started on June 12, when senior deputy governor Carolyn Wilkins told a Winnipeg audience that Canada’s economy was starting to “pick up” and was showing signs of “moving past” the oil shock.

That prompted speculation that the bank was ready to take its foot off the gas, a notion that was reinforced by a number of pronouncements since then. Poloz told U.S. financial network CNBC this week that “those cuts have done their job.” That may not sound like a ringing endorsement, but economists who monitor the bank say it marks a sea change in messaging.

“If they think those cuts have done their job,” BMO economist Doug Porter told CBC last week, “now they can reverse them.”

He’s not the only one who expects a rate hike. It would be “imprudent to ignore the aggressive communication shift we have seen from the Bank of Canada,” Manulife’s senior economist Frances Donald said.

Since Wilkins’s speech started the speculation, the bank has had more than one chance to walk down those expectations, if it felt her comments were misinterpreted. The fact that the bank hasn’t done so speaks volumes, Donald said.

Currently, bets on the bond market imply there’s about a 60 per cent chance of a rate hike next week, something the Canadian economy hasn’t seen since September 2010.

While nobody’s expecting anything more than a slight 25-point ratcheting-up of the rate to 0.75, the symbolism of such a move is huge. Spurred on by cheap lending and housing prices that have been defying gravity for the better part of a decade, Canadians are now more in debt than ever before.

Technically, the Bank of Canada’s mandate is to manage inflation, not worry about debt loads. But a major move to interest rates would be catastrophic with debt loads sitting so high, which is why the bank seems to be warning borrowers that they’re going to slowly start taking away the punchbowl from homebuyers who’ve overindulged.

As BMO economist Benjamin Reitzes put it, the “desire to instill a bit more discipline in the housing market,” is clearly in the back of the central bank’s mind while telegraphing their change of heart.

Scotiabank economist Derek Holt is among those who thinks a hike is coming next week, and maybe even another one before the year is out. Otherwise its own pronouncements may have painted the bank into a corner, he says.

“The Bank of Canada is going to have a serious credibility problem if it fails to raise interest rates … after providing such an aggressive turn in communications starting one month to the day ahead of the July meeting,” Holt said.


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FHA Mortgage Insurance

FHA mortgage insurance lowered by .5% a year, starting Jan. 26th, 2015.

Calculate your new lower FHA mortgage insurance payment with updated FHA mortgage insurance calculator. Learn more about mortgage insurance reduction below.

FHA Mortgage Insurance Calculator – Calculate the up-front FHA mortgage insurance premium (FHA MIP or UFMIP) and the monthly FHA mortgage insurance (FHA MMI). View current FHA loan requirements based on loan amount, loan to value and mortgage amortization terms with this FHA mortgage insurance calculator based on must recent HUD mortgagee letter 2013-04 which updated FHA mortgage insurance on April 1, 2013. Updated HUD mortgagee letter 2015-1 – “Reduction of Federal Housing Administration (FHA) annual Mortgage Insurance Premium (MIP) rates”

Mortgage calculator with insurance Mortgage Insurance Calculator Instructions

Step 1: Select Loan Purpose

Step 2: Enter Sales Price and FHA Mortgage Amount

Step 3: Click “Calculate FHA Mortgage Insurance”

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What is FHA Mortgage Insurance?

The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) was created to help increase homeownership in America by allowing homebuyers to purchase a home with a low FHA downpayment of 3.5% vs. traditional 20% downpayment.

In order to encourage banks and mortgage lenders to provide financing these low downpayment mortgages, FHA provides mortgage insurance to help protect the lenders from the average 3-9% of borrowers who default on mortgages where lenders are forced to foreclose.

FHA mortgage insurance are fee’s collected upfront and/or monthly from borrowers which are used to help protect mortgage lenders (and bank depositors money) from serious financial losses due to defaults on these higher risk mortgages with down payments of less than 20%.

If there was no FHA mortgage insurance it is very likely that most home buyers would be required to put a downpayment of 20% or more when buying a home and this would lower homeownership in America and lower home prices.

Upfront FHA Mortgage Insurance Premium (FHA MIP)

The Federal Housing Administration charges borrowers an upfront mortgage insurance premium (FHA MIP) on FHA mortgages. This upfront mortgage insurance premium is based on a percentage of the FHA loan amount and is dependant on the type of mortgage.

  • Purchase FHA loans and FHA refinance mortgages – the current FHA mortgage insurance premium requirement is 1.75% of the mortgage amount

Calculate your upfront FHA mortgage insurance premium / FHA MIP using the above FHA MIP calculator or use our FHA mortgage payment calculator to calculate your full FHA monthly mortgage payment with principal, interest, taxes and insurance.

FHA Monthly Mortgage Insurance (FHA MMI)

Monthly mortgage insurance or MMI is a monthly prorated mortgage insurance which is included in FHA mortgage payments. The mortgage insurance is part of the PITI mortgage payment calculation for FHA loans.

Below are some details of current monthly FHA mortgage insurance.

  • All FHA 30 year mortgages and FHA 15 year mortgage regardless of loan to value require FHA monthly mortgage insurance.

Use our FHA mortgage calculator with taxes and insurance to calculate your exact monthly mortgage insurance premium and piti mortgage payment for either FHA 30 year mortgages or FHA 15 year mortgages.

2015 FHA Mortgage Insurance Premium Chart

Chart of current mortgage insurance rates for FHA loans updated on Jan 8th for all loans after Jan 29, 2015.


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You type in an equation and this applet will draw your graph on an x,y coordinate grid. You can graph one, two, or more equations and compare graphs

Note: When you click on this link, a new window will open. It may take a few minutes to load – please be patient! Equations are entered in terms of x, such as: 2*x+5 (the asterisk must always be used for multiplication). More help with typing in equations in available once the applet is running.


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Mortgage Calculator

Estimated mortgage payment

$1,115.57 / Month

Mortgages

A mortgage is a loan secured by a property usually a real estate property. A real estate mortgage usually includes the following key components:

  • Loan Amount the amount borrowed from a lender or bank. The maximum loan amount one can borrow normally correlates with household income or affordability. To estimate an affordable amount, please use our House Affordability Calculator.
  • Down Payment the upfront payment of the purchase, usually in a percentage of the total price. In the US, if the down payment is less than 20% of the total property price, typically, private mortgage insurance (PMI) is required to be purchased until the principal arrives at less than 80% or 78% of the total property price. The PMI rate normally ranges from 0.3%-1.5% (generally around 1%) of the total loan amount, depending on various factors. A general rule-of-thumb is that the higher the down payment, the more favorable the interest rate.
  • Loan Term the agreed upon length of time the loan shall be repaid in full. The most popular lengths are 30 years and 15 years. Normally, the shorter the loan term, the lower the interest rate.
  • Interest Rate the rate of interest charged by a mortgage lender. It can be “fixed” (otherwise known as a fixed-rate mortgage, or FRM), or “adjustable” (otherwise known as an adjustable rate mortgage, or ARM). The calculator above is only usable for fixed rates. For ARMs, interest rates are generally fixed for a period of time, after which they will be periodically “adjusted” based on market indices. ARMs transfer part of the risk to borrowers. Therefore, the initial interest rates are normally 0.5% to 2% lower than FRM with the same loan term. Mortgage interest rates are normally expressed in Annual Percentage Rate (APR), which is sometimes called nominal APR or effective APR. It is the interest rate expressed as a periodic rate multiplied by the number of compounding periods in a year. For example, if a mortgage rate is 6% APR, it means the borrower will have to pay 6% divided by twelve, which comes out to 0.5% in interest every month.

The most common way to repay a mortgage loan is to make monthly, fixed payments to the lender. The payment contains both the principal and the interest. For a typical 30-year loan, the majority of the payments in the first few years cover the interest.

Costs Associated with Mortgages and Home Ownership

Commonly, monthly mortgage payments will consist of the bulk of the financial costs associated with owning a house, but there are other important costs to keep in mind. In some cases, these costs combined can be more than the mortgage payments. Be sure to keep these costs in mind when planning to purchase a home.

Because the recurring costs perpetuate throughout the lives of mortgages (exception being PMI), they are a significant financial factor. Property Taxes, Home Insurance, HOA Fee, and Other Costs increase with time as a byproduct of moderate inflation. There are optional inputs within the calculator for annual percentage increases. Using these wisely can result in more accurate calculations.

  • Property Taxes a tax that property owners pay to governing authorities. In the U.S., property tax is usually managed by municipal or county government. The annual real estate tax in the U.S. varies by location, normally ranging from 1% to 4% of the property value. In some extreme cases, the tax rate can be 10% or higher.
  • Home Insurance an insurance policy that protects the owner from accidents that may happen to the private residence or other real estate properties. Home insurance can also contain personal liability coverage, which protects against lawsuits involving injuries that occur on and off the property. The cost of home insurance varies according to factors such as location, condition of property, and coverage amount. Typically, the annual cost can range from 0.1% to 5% of the property value.
  • Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) protects the mortgage lender if the borrower is unable to repay. In the U.S. specifically, if the down payment is less than 20% of the property value, the lender will normally require the borrower to purchase PMI until the loan-to-value ratio (LTV) reaches 80% or 78%. PMI price varies according to factors such as down payment, size of the loan, and credit of the borrower. The annual cost typically ranges from 0.3% to 1.5% of the loan amount.
  • HOA Fee a fee that is imposed on the property owner by an organization that maintains and improves property and environment of the neighborhoods that the specific organization covers. Common real estate that requires HOA fees include condominiums, townhomes, and some single-family communities. Annual HOA fees usually amount to less than one percent of the property value.
  • Other Costs includes utilities, home maintenance costs, and anything pertaining to the general upkeep of the property. Many miscellaneous costs can be deceptively high and it is important to consider them in the big picture. It is common to spend 1% or more of the property value on annual maintenance alone.

While these costs aren’t contained within calculations, they are still important to keep in mind.

  • Closing Costs the fees paid at the closing of a real estate transaction. It is not a recurring fee yet it can be expensive. In the U.S., even though not all are applicable, the closing cost on a mortgage can include attorney fee, title service cost, recording fee, survey fee, property transfer tax, brokerage commission, mortgage application fee, points, appraisal fee, inspection fee, home warranty, pre-paid home insurance, pro-rata property taxes, pro-rata homeowner association dues, pro-rata interest, and more. Sellers will share some of these costs. It is not unusual for a buyer to pay $10,000 in total closing costs on a $300,000 transaction.
  • Initial Renovations Some buyers invest money into renovations, features, or updates before moving in. Examples may be changing the flooring, repainting the walls, or even adding a patio.

Besides these, new furniture, new appliances, and moving costs are also common non-recurring costs of a home purchase.

Early Repayment and Extra Payments

For many situations, mortgage borrowers may want to pay off mortgages earlier rather than later, either in whole or in part, for reasons including but not limited to interest savings, home selling, or refinancing. Most mortgage lenders allow borrowers to pay off up to 20% of the loan balance each year but few may have prepayment penalties for one-time payoffs, mainly to prevent refinancing too soon (which will affect the lender’s profit). One-time payoff due to home selling is normally exempt from a prepayment penalty. The penalty amount typically decreases with time until it phases out within 5 years. Few lenders charge prepayment penalties regardless of home-selling or refinancing, but be sure to review the loan terms carefully anyway just in case.

Some borrowers may want to pay off their mortgage loan earlier to reduce interest. Typically, there are three ways to do so. The methods can be used in combination or individually.

  1. Refinance to a loan with a shorter term Normally, interest rates of shorter term mortgage loans are lower. Therefore, borrowers not only repay their loan balances faster, but receive lower and more favorable interest rates on their mortgages. Keep in mind that this imposes higher financial pressure on the borrower due to higher monthly mortgage payments. Also, there may be fees or penalties involved.
  2. Make extra payments the majority of the earliest mortgage payments will be for interest instead of principal on typical long-term mortgage loan. Any extra payments will decrease loan balances, therefore decreasing interest and pay off earlier in the long run. Some people form the habit of paying extra every month, while others pay extra whenever they can. There are optional inputs to include many extra payments, and it can be helpful to compare the results of supplementing mortgages with extra payments and without.
  3. Make biweekly (once every two weeks) payments of half month’s payment instead Since there are 52 weeks each year, this is the equivalent of making 13 months of mortgage repayments a year instead of 12. Utilizing this method, mortgages can be paid off earlier. Displayed in the calculated results are biweekly payments for comparison purposes.

The Calculator has the tools to help evaluate the options. Please be aware that the rates on mortgages tend to be very low compared with other types of loans. Also, mortgage interest is tax-deductible, and home equity accumulated may be counted against borrowers when applying for need-based college aid. Be sure to consider comprehensively before paying off mortgage loans earlier.


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Mortgage Payment Calculator

Use our mortgage loan calculator to determine the monthly payments for any fixed-rate loan. Just enter the amount and terms, and our mortgage calculator does the rest. Click on “Show Amortization” Table to see how much interest you’ll pay each month and over the lifetime of the loan. The mortgage loan calculator will also show how extra payments can accelerate your payoff and save thousands in interest charges.

Amortization Table

Calculate a mortgage payment

Calculate a mortgage payment

Calculate a mortgage payment

Calculate a mortgage payment

Whether you’re buying a new home or refinancing, our mortgage calculator can do the math for you. Simply enter the amount, term and interest rate to get your monthly payment amount. If you’re refinancing, enter the current balance on your mortgage into the loan amount section and input the new term and new rate that you’ll receive. Then click on the amortization table to see how much interest you’ll pay over the life of the loan. Add extra payments to find out how they can put your payoff schedule on the fast-track and save you thousands.

Keep in mind that this calculator only calculates the mortgage payment. It does not include taxes, insurance or other fees included in the purchase of your home.

Loan amount: The amount of money you’re borrowing. It’s the cost of your new home minus the down payment if you’re buying or the balance on your existing mortgage if refinancing.

Interest rate: The exact rate you will receive on your loan, not the APR.

Loan term: The length of time you have to pay off your loan (30- and 15-year fixed-rate loans are common terms).

Amortization table: Timetable detailing each monthly payment of a mortgage. Details include the payment, principal paid, interest paid, total interest paid and current balance for each payment period.

Monthly extra payment: Extra amount added to each monthly payment to reduce loan length and interest paid.

Yearly extra payment: Extra amount paid each year to reduce loan length and interest paid.

One-time extra payment: Extra amount added once to reduce loan length and interest paid.

Calculate a mortgage payment


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$1,115.57 / Month

Mortgages

A mortgage is a loan secured by a property usually a real estate property. A real estate mortgage usually includes the following key components:

  • Loan Amount the amount borrowed from a lender or bank. The maximum loan amount one can borrow normally correlates with household income or affordability. To estimate an affordable amount, please use our House Affordability Calculator.
  • Down Payment the upfront payment of the purchase, usually in a percentage of the total price. In the US, if the down payment is less than 20% of the total property price, typically, private mortgage insurance (PMI) is required to be purchased until the principal arrives at less than 80% or 78% of the total property price. The PMI rate normally ranges from 0.3%-1.5% (generally around 1%) of the total loan amount, depending on various factors. A general rule-of-thumb is that the higher the down payment, the more favorable the interest rate.
  • Loan Term the agreed upon length of time the loan shall be repaid in full. The most popular lengths are 30 years and 15 years. Normally, the shorter the loan term, the lower the interest rate.
  • Interest Rate the rate of interest charged by a mortgage lender. It can be “fixed” (otherwise known as a fixed-rate mortgage, or FRM), or “adjustable” (otherwise known as an adjustable rate mortgage, or ARM). The calculator above is only usable for fixed rates. For ARMs, interest rates are generally fixed for a period of time, after which they will be periodically “adjusted” based on market indices. ARMs transfer part of the risk to borrowers. Therefore, the initial interest rates are normally 0.5% to 2% lower than FRM with the same loan term. Mortgage interest rates are normally expressed in Annual Percentage Rate (APR), which is sometimes called nominal APR or effective APR. It is the interest rate expressed as a periodic rate multiplied by the number of compounding periods in a year. For example, if a mortgage rate is 6% APR, it means the borrower will have to pay 6% divided by twelve, which comes out to 0.5% in interest every month.

The most common way to repay a mortgage loan is to make monthly, fixed payments to the lender. The payment contains both the principal and the interest. For a typical 30-year loan, the majority of the payments in the first few years cover the interest.

Costs Associated with Mortgages and Home Ownership

Commonly, monthly mortgage payments will consist of the bulk of the financial costs associated with owning a house, but there are other important costs to keep in mind. In some cases, these costs combined can be more than the mortgage payments. Be sure to keep these costs in mind when planning to purchase a home.

Because the recurring costs perpetuate throughout the lives of mortgages (exception being PMI), they are a significant financial factor. Property Taxes, Home Insurance, HOA Fee, and Other Costs increase with time as a byproduct of moderate inflation. There are optional inputs within the calculator for annual percentage increases. Using these wisely can result in more accurate calculations.

  • Property Taxes a tax that property owners pay to governing authorities. In the U.S., property tax is usually managed by municipal or county government. The annual real estate tax in the U.S. varies by location, normally ranging from 1% to 4% of the property value. In some extreme cases, the tax rate can be 10% or higher.
  • Home Insurance an insurance policy that protects the owner from accidents that may happen to the private residence or other real estate properties. Home insurance can also contain personal liability coverage, which protects against lawsuits involving injuries that occur on and off the property. The cost of home insurance varies according to factors such as location, condition of property, and coverage amount. Typically, the annual cost can range from 0.1% to 5% of the property value.
  • Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) protects the mortgage lender if the borrower is unable to repay. In the U.S. specifically, if the down payment is less than 20% of the property value, the lender will normally require the borrower to purchase PMI until the loan-to-value ratio (LTV) reaches 80% or 78%. PMI price varies according to factors such as down payment, size of the loan, and credit of the borrower. The annual cost typically ranges from 0.3% to 1.5% of the loan amount.
  • HOA Fee a fee that is imposed on the property owner by an organization that maintains and improves property and environment of the neighborhoods that the specific organization covers. Common real estate that requires HOA fees include condominiums, townhomes, and some single-family communities. Annual HOA fees usually amount to less than one percent of the property value.
  • Other Costs includes utilities, home maintenance costs, and anything pertaining to the general upkeep of the property. Many miscellaneous costs can be deceptively high and it is important to consider them in the big picture. It is common to spend 1% or more of the property value on annual maintenance alone.

While these costs aren’t contained within calculations, they are still important to keep in mind.

  • Closing Costs the fees paid at the closing of a real estate transaction. It is not a recurring fee yet it can be expensive. In the U.S., even though not all are applicable, the closing cost on a mortgage can include attorney fee, title service cost, recording fee, survey fee, property transfer tax, brokerage commission, mortgage application fee, points, appraisal fee, inspection fee, home warranty, pre-paid home insurance, pro-rata property taxes, pro-rata homeowner association dues, pro-rata interest, and more. Sellers will share some of these costs. It is not unusual for a buyer to pay $10,000 in total closing costs on a $300,000 transaction.
  • Initial Renovations Some buyers invest money into renovations, features, or updates before moving in. Examples may be changing the flooring, repainting the walls, or even adding a patio.

Besides these, new furniture, new appliances, and moving costs are also common non-recurring costs of a home purchase.

Early Repayment and Extra Payments

For many situations, mortgage borrowers may want to pay off mortgages earlier rather than later, either in whole or in part, for reasons including but not limited to interest savings, home selling, or refinancing. Most mortgage lenders allow borrowers to pay off up to 20% of the loan balance each year but few may have prepayment penalties for one-time payoffs, mainly to prevent refinancing too soon (which will affect the lender’s profit). One-time payoff due to home selling is normally exempt from a prepayment penalty. The penalty amount typically decreases with time until it phases out within 5 years. Few lenders charge prepayment penalties regardless of home-selling or refinancing, but be sure to review the loan terms carefully anyway just in case.

Some borrowers may want to pay off their mortgage loan earlier to reduce interest. Typically, there are three ways to do so. The methods can be used in combination or individually.

  1. Refinance to a loan with a shorter term Normally, interest rates of shorter term mortgage loans are lower. Therefore, borrowers not only repay their loan balances faster, but receive lower and more favorable interest rates on their mortgages. Keep in mind that this imposes higher financial pressure on the borrower due to higher monthly mortgage payments. Also, there may be fees or penalties involved.
  2. Make extra payments the majority of the earliest mortgage payments will be for interest instead of principal on typical long-term mortgage loan. Any extra payments will decrease loan balances, therefore decreasing interest and pay off earlier in the long run. Some people form the habit of paying extra every month, while others pay extra whenever they can. There are optional inputs to include many extra payments, and it can be helpful to compare the results of supplementing mortgages with extra payments and without.
  3. Make biweekly (once every two weeks) payments of half month’s payment instead Since there are 52 weeks each year, this is the equivalent of making 13 months of mortgage repayments a year instead of 12. Utilizing this method, mortgages can be paid off earlier. Displayed in the calculated results are biweekly payments for comparison purposes.

The Calculator has the tools to help evaluate the options. Please be aware that the rates on mortgages tend to be very low compared with other types of loans. Also, mortgage interest is tax-deductible, and home equity accumulated may be counted against borrowers when applying for need-based college aid. Be sure to consider comprehensively before paying off mortgage loans earlier.


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Mortgage Calculator

  • Monthly Payment (Principal and Interest)

Mortgage calculator for your home loan

This mortgage calculator will show how much your monthly mortgage payment would be, including your amortization schedule. See how much you could save by prepaying some of the principal. Find out your home loan breakdown now by using this simple and free mortgage calculator.

NOTE: This calculator updates automatically as you move from field to field using the “tab” key. If you’re entering prepayment information, click the “calculate” button to see the final results.

A mortgage amortization calculator shows how much of your monthly mortgage payment will go toward principal and interest over the life of your loan. The loan calculator also lets you see how much you can save by prepaying some of the principal.

How to use the loan amortization calculator

With HSH.com’s home loan calculator, you enter the features of your mortgage: amount of the principal loan balance, the interest rate, the home loan term, and the month and year the loan begins.

Your initial display will show you the monthly mortgage payment, total interest paid, breakout of principal and interest, and your mortgage payoff date.

Most of your mortgage loan payment will go toward interest in the early years of the loan, with a growing amount going toward the loan principal as the years go by – until finally almost all of your payment goes toward principal at the end. For instance, in the first year of a 30-year, $250,000 mortgage with a fixed 5% interest rate, $12,416.24 of your payments goes toward interest, and only $3,688.41 goes towards your principal. To see this, click on “Payment chart” and mouse over any year.

Clicking on “Amortization schedule” reveals a display table of the total principal and interest paid in each year of the mortgage and your remaining principal balance at the end of each calendar year. Clicking the “+” sign next to a year reveals a month-by-month breakdown of your costs.

Click “calculate” to get your monthly payment amount and an amortization schedule.

The effect of prepayments

Now use the mortgage loan calculator to see how prepaying some of the principal saves money over time. The calculator allows you to enter a monthly, annual, bi-weekly or one-time amount for additional principal prepayment.To do so, click “+ Prepayment options.”

Let’s say, for example, you want to pay an extra $50 a month. Using the $250,000 example above, enter “50” in the monthly principal prepayment field, then either hit “tab” or scroll down to click “calculate.” Initial results will be displayed under “Payment details,” and you can see further details in either the “Payment chart” or “Amortization schedule” tabs.

You may also target a certain loan term or monthly payment by using our mortgage prepayment calculator. Of course you’ll want to consult with your financial advisor about whether it’s best to prepay your mortgage or put that money toward something else, such as retirement.

HSH.com has developed a host of other free mortgage calculators to help answer your other questions, such as, “Can I qualify for a mortgage,” “Will prepaying my mortgage help me save money,” “How large of a down payment do I really need,” “What s the best way to pay for my refinance,” and “When will my home no longer be underwater?” See all of HSH.com’s mortgage calculators.

This is the dollar amount of the mortgage you are borrowing. (Hitting “tab” after entering information in any field will automatically update the calculations.)

The loan’s interest rate. Along with the term, this is the key factor used by the mortgage payment calculator to determine what your monthly payment will be. To see where rates are right now, click on the “See today’s average rates” link to the right of the field, where you can also find offers from our advertising partners.

Mortgage loans come in a range of terms. Fixed rate mortgages are most often found in 30, 20, 15 and 10-year terms; Adjustable Rate Mortgages usually have total terms of 30 years, but the fixed interest rate period is much shorter than that, lasting from 1 to 10 years.

To get the most accurate calculations, use the month and year in which your very first mortgage payment was due (or will be due). If you don’t yet have a mortgage, the current month and year will work just fine.

This display shows the monthly mortgage payment, total interest paid, breakout of principal and interest, and your mortgage payoff date.

This display shows you the total principal and interest paid in each year of the mortgage and your remaining principal balance at the end of each calendar year.

While this display table also shows you the total principal and interest paid in each year of the mortgage and your remaining principal balance at the end of each calendar year, clicking the “+” sign next to a year reveals a month-by-month breakdown of your costs.

In this optional section, you can add in a regular monthly prepayment amount, re-set the calculator to show bi-weekly payments and savings, or even do a one-time prepayment to see how it affects the cost of your home loan.

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Commercial mortgage calculator#Commercial #mortgage #calculator


Commercial Property Loan Calculator

This tool figures payments on a commercial property, offering payment amounts for P & I, Interest-Only and Balloon repayments along with providing a monthly amortization schedule.

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What You Need to Know About Commercial Property Financing

Obtaining a business real estate advance is a lot more difficult than getting a home advance, and you need to be prepared for a grueling process that has many twists and turns – and sometimes a surprise ending.

If you’ve never applied for a business advance before, you may be surprised by how picky commercial lenders can be. And then you have to consider how risky the process can be for you personally. In the event that your commercial lender turns you down at the last minute after the wheels have already started to turn, you might even have to declare bankruptcy.

You’ll need to pay appraisal fees and toxic report costs, and these don’t come cheap. If you are turned down and need to start a new application, you may have to pay for all of these third-party reports again. To make the game even riskier, there are many impostors masquerading as direct commercial lenders, and they are only interested in ripping you off to collect the exorbitant application fees.

In order to avoid a series of missteps that could land you in hot water, it’s best to understand the specific steps of obtaining a business real estate loan before you start looking for a suitable lender.

Firstly, it’s important to understand one of the fundamental differences between commercial property loans and residential mortgages. While home loans are typically backed by a government entity like Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, loans for business properties are not.

As a result, the lenders charge higher interest rates and are hungry for lots of assurance.

Some lenders will go so far as to evaluate the borrower’s business model, as well as the commercial building that will serve as collateral. Don’t go into a commercial real estate lender’s office with the same expectations as you would when you’re applying for an advance secured against your primary residence. It’s a different ball game.

Commercial mortgage calculator

Meeting The Loan Repayment Terms

In the world of business real estate financing, lenders expect the borrower to repay the entire business advance earlier than the due date. They do this by including a balloon repayment stipulation. This means that the borrower pays on his 30-year mortgage as usual for a few years with principal and interest payments, and then he ll have to pay off the entire balance in one fell swoop, or one balloon payment.

But a balloon loan could be a recipe for disaster, especially if the borrower is not ready when the balloon payment comes due (usually after 3, 5, or 10 years). If this is the case, the borrower must refinance the advance. Remember that the lender is keeping one eye on the borrower’s business and cash flow. If it appears to the lender that the business is not doing well in the years leading up to the balloon payment, the lender may jack up the interest rate or flat out refuse to refinance. The prospect of the realty going into foreclosure is always a concern with balloon loans.

How Long Does It Take?

You should receive a preliminary answer or pre-approval the same day or the next business day, but this doesn’t guarantee that your loan will be approved. The lender needs 10 to 20 additional business days to run detailed financial reports and in-depth credit checks.

The loan is then scrutinized by underwriters, and these are seriously picky people. They want to meet you (and sometimes your business associates) before deciding if they should lend you money. Once the loan application has gained the approval of the underwriter, you just hammer out the terms and sign on the dotted line. Although many lenders boast that they can push a business loan through in 45 days or less, it usually takes closer to three months.

The Required Documents

Even before you apply for the advance, inquire about the necessary documentation. Some small businesses lack the kind of income documentation required for business lending, so it would be a waste of time to start the process in the face of insurmountable roadblocks.

Business property financiers need to see the last 3 to 5 years of tax returns and financial statements, including:

  • Corporate documents
  • Asset statements
  • Leases
  • Personal financial records

The more documentation required, the longer the advance approval process will take.

Watch Out For Hidden Costs

Don’t be fooled by a low interest rate if there are too many fees involved, including but not limited to legal fees, application fees, appraisal fees, and survey charges. It may seem confusing at times, but remember that points are percentages that the lender pockets off the top. If your interest rate is 9 percent with two points, the real cost of borrowing the money is 11 percent.

In some instances, these charges and hidden fees can add up to tens of thousands of dollars, so you need to find out if it’s likely you’ll be approved before you drop a small fortune on the application fees.

Banks vs. Non-Bank Lenders

Non-bank lenders (such as silent investors, for example) are usually less strict about their eligibility requirements, and many are willing to loan you money without including the early balloon repayment stipulation. In reality, these loans are just like home advances in that they offer you a steady repayment plan spread out over 20 or 30 years. However, they do carry slightly higher interest rates.

There are some other disadvantages to non-bank commercial property borrowing, namely the high expectations of the lender. If you don’t generate an anticipated profit, a nervous private lender may pull the plug on your funding. Until he sees a return on his investment, he may even start taking possession of items you posted as collateral.

The obvious advantage of obtaining your loan through a traditional bank is the rigorous reporting system it offers. If you make all your payments on time, your bank reports will reflect that. In turn, this will increase your credit rating and make it easier for you to qualify for loans in the future.

Top Tips For Business Property Borrowers

Here are the top tips for getting the most out of your commercial property loan:

1. Shop Around

Don’t rely on a single commercial lender. Instead, contact at least three different lenders. business lending is very subjective, meaning your eligibility is determined by someone who may or may not be fair. The more options you have, including both banks and non-bank lenders, the more likely you are to get approved.

2. Beware of Charlatans

Why would anyone pretend to be a direct commercial lender? To steal your application fees, of course! There are con men lurking everywhere, and the slick business real estate lenders who greet you with a contract in one hand and a pen in the other are to be avoided.

3. Be Prepared For a Long Wait

Commercial lenders, like home contractors, always exaggerate how quickly the work will get done. In fact, you can expect a three-month processing period, no matter what the lender promises.

4. Toxic Reports

You’ll have to provide a toxic report to the potential lender if you default on your payments and the lender forecloses on your land. After all, the lender is responsible for any cleanup costs if the property is contaminated – unless the lender first gets a Level 1 toxic report to keep on file.

5. Lenders Must Order The Appraisal

Never let a mortgage broker talk you into letting him order the appraisal. Only the lender can do that, or by law, the bank won’t be able to accept it.

6. Wait For The Term Sheet

A term sheet is a written declaration of interest by a direct commercial lender that comes with an estimate of the terms. While it is not binding, it is a very desirable document to have. Don’t agree to pay for an appraisal until you see a term sheet that has terms that are acceptable to you.

7. Location, Location, Location

Location is equally important when it comes to choosing a lender for business real estate. As a rule of thumb, local lenders have better deals than out-of-town lenders.

8. Use Your Deposit Relationship

If your company generates a high cash flow, you can use the promise of a deposit relationship to get a better deal. Promise to transfer all of your accounts to the bank that handles your business real estate. Smaller banks will especially appreciate the additional cash flowing into their coffers.


Mortgage Affordability Calculator Canada, quick mortgage calculator.#Quick #mortgage #calculator


Mortgage Affordability Calculator

When browsing real estate listings for a new home, the first step is to figure out how much you can afford. Affordability is based on the household income of the applicants purchasing the house, the personal monthly expenses of those applicants (car payments, credit expenses, etc.), and the expenses associated with owning a home (property taxes, condo fees, and heating costs). The calculator below will show you the maximum purchase price that you can qualify for.

You also need to determine if you have enough cash resources to purchase a home. The cash required is derived from the down payment put towards the purchase price, as well as the closing costs that must be incurred to complete the purchase. Ratehub.ca can help you estimate these closing costs with first tab under our affordability calculator.

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Affordability

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How to estimate affordability

Lenders look at two ratios when determining the mortgage amount you qualify for, which generally indicate how much you can afford. These ratios are called the Gross Debt Service (GDS) ratio and Total Debt Service (TDS) ratio. They take into account your income, monthly housing costs and overall debt load.

The first affordability rule, as set out by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), is that your monthly housing costs – mortgage principal and interest, taxes and heating expenses (P.I.T.H.) – should not exceed 32% of your gross household monthly income. For condominiums, P.I.T.H. also includes half of your monthly condominium fees. The sum of these housing costs as a percentage of your gross monthly income is your GDS ratio.

The CMHC’s second affordability rule is that your total monthly debt load, including housing costs, should not be more than 40% of your gross monthly income. In addition to housing costs, your total monthly debt load would include credit card interest, car payments, and other loan expenses. The sum of your total monthly debt load as a percentage of your gross household income is your TDS ratio.

Note that while the industry guideline for GDS and TDS is 32% and 40% respectively, most borrowers with good credit and steady income will be allowed to exceed these limits. The maximum allowed is 39% and 44%. The calculator uses these maximums to estimate affordability.

Down Payment

Your down payment is a benchmark used to determine your maximum affordability. Ignoring income and debt levels, you can determine how much you can afford to spend using a simple calculation:

  • If your down payment is $25,000 or less, you can find your maximum purchase price using this formula: down payment / 5% = maximum affordability.
  • If your down payment is $25,001 or more, you can find your maximum purchase price using this formula: down payment amount – $25,000 / 10% + $500,000. For example, if you have saved $50,000 for your down payment, the maximum home price you could afford would be $50,000 – $25,000 = $25,000 / 10% = $250,000 + $500,000 = $750,000.

Any mortgage with less than a 20% down payment is known as a high-ratio mortgage, and requires you to purchase mortgage default insurance, commonly referred to as CMHC insurance.

Cash requirement

In addition to your down payment and CMHC insurance, you should set aside 1.5% – 4% of your home’s selling price to cover closing costs, which are payable on closing day. Many home buyers forget to account for closing costs in their cash requirement.

Other mortgage qualification factors

In addition to your debt service ratios, down payment, and cash for closing costs, mortgage lenders will also consider your credit history and your income when qualifying you for a mortgage. All of these factors are equally important. For example even if you have good credit, a sizeable down payment, and no debts, but an unstable income, you might have difficulty getting approved for a mortgage.

Keep in mind that the mortgage affordability calculator can only provide an estimate of how much you’ll be approved for, and assumes you’re an ideal candidate for a mortgage. To get the most accurate picture of what you qualify for, speak to a mortgage broker about getting a mortgage pre-approval.